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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

William B. Werther

Management development programmes often do not capture seniormanagers and executives as attendees, leading to a developmental gapamong organizational leaders. Even when…

Abstract

Management development programmes often do not capture senior managers and executives as attendees, leading to a developmental gap among organizational leaders. Even when the need is obvious, training and development managers can seldom require executive attendance. Issues of status, time, perceived importance, and other barriers often leave top management outside the developmental loop. Addresses an ongoing, university/corporate partnership which provides targeted development opportunities for top management in a way which bypasses many typical barriers and partially closes the seniormanagement development gap.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Sheila Jackson, Elaine Farndale and Andrew Kakabadse

In a review of the literature, supported by six case studies, executive development for senior managers in public and private organisations is explored in depth. The study…

Abstract

In a review of the literature, supported by six case studies, executive development for senior managers in public and private organisations is explored in depth. The study looks at the roles and responsibilities of the chairman, CEO, executive and non‐executive directors, the required capabilities to achieve successful performance, and the related executive development activity implemented to support these. Methods of delivery, development needs analysis and evaluation are explored in case organisations to ascertain current practice. A detailed review of the leadership and governance literatures is included to highlight the breadth of knowledge required at director level. Key findings of the study include the importance of focusing executive development on capability enhancement, to ensure that it is supporting organisational priorities, and on its thorough customisation to the corporate context. Deficiencies in current corporate practice are also identified.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Richard Walker and Philip Morgan

Reports the results of a survey of 209 senior registrars and 269 consultants throughout Wales to identify the management development needs of doctors and ascertain their…

Abstract

Reports the results of a survey of 209 senior registrars and 269 consultants throughout Wales to identify the management development needs of doctors and ascertain their views of the value and utility of current management development course offerings in Wales. Finds that, currently, management development for doctors in Wales is unstructured and unco‐ordinated but, despite this, many doctors, especially senior registrars, appeared keen to increase their future involvement in management and held positive views regarding management and management development. The questionnaire also required doctors to rank order six managerial topics and their elements: financial, human resource, strategic, operational, service quality and self‐management. Of these, self‐management issues were rated highest and there was some congruity in the rankings of the six topics by senior registrars and the other three consultant categories. Overall, managing a budget, medical and clinical audit, negotiating skills and leadership skills were ranked highest for inclusion in management development while project management, quality circles and equal opportunities received the lowest ratings.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Farhad Analoui

Recently there has been a growing awareness in the Western worldthat to be effective senior managers need to acquire people‐relatedskills. In contrast, in developing…

Abstract

Recently there has been a growing awareness in the Western world that to be effective senior managers need to acquire people‐related skills. In contrast, in developing countries management educators and trainers still seem to be preoccupied with traditional task‐related management training. To discover which topics senior managers in developing countries believed should be incorporated into a management course, a survey of senior officials in Zimbabwe′s public sector was carried out. A combination of questionnaire and semi‐structured interviews as a means of data collection proved to be productive. The results revealed that a suitable management training programme should provide senior managers with a balance of people and task‐related managerial skills, and with an opportunity for self‐development. It is concluded that if management training programmes for senior managers were designed accordingly, this would lead to increased job satisfaction and managerial effectiveness.

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International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Sally Sambrook

Aims to provide a brief discussion of discourses of HRD, then a brief review of HRD within the NHS, including stakeholders in HRD, and particularly management development

Abstract

Purpose

Aims to provide a brief discussion of discourses of HRD, then a brief review of HRD within the NHS, including stakeholders in HRD, and particularly management development. To explore some of the different discourses used by different managers, particularly those with a nursing background and those without, and the possible reasons for the use of these different discourses.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study approach was adopted, including semi‐structured interviews. Primary research data were collected from tape‐recorded interviews with seven Directorate General Managers from two Welsh NHS Trusts. Discourse analysis was used to explore connections between the participants, the discursive resources they employed and their professional identities.

Findings

Provides evidence of some of the tensions associated with management development in the NHS, between professional and managerial development, between central and local HR activities, and between competition and cooperation. A particularly interesting dimension is the transition from being a nurse to becoming a manager and the ways in which different individuals cope, as articulated in their language use. Highlights some of the discursive struggles to maintain one's professional (nursing) identify when promoted to managerial positions. It provides examples of some nurses who have adopted the new managerial discourse without such apparent difficulty of changed identity. It also presents material from NHS managers who have no nursing background to enable further comparative analysis of the relationships between identity and discourse.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited by small sample size, although feedback suggests the findings can be generalised to other NHS Trusts across the United Kingdom, and possibly globally. Not one senior manager used the term HRD – it was always “training and development” or “professional development” or “managerial and organisational development” and sometimes “learning”. Nor was there much use of the government's preferred term “workforce development”. This has implications for HRD research within this context, suggesting the need for shared understanding amongst researchers and participants.

Practical implications

Various and varying discourses and associated discursive resources are identified, illustrating the diversity of talk about HRD within the NHS. As one DGM commented, “I think we're using the same words but it means something completely different”. This has practical implications, suggesting the need for shared understanding amongst HRD stakeholders to ensure a coherent and integrated approach to HRD within this complex multi‐disciplinary context.

Originality/value

How HRD is talked about and accomplished through talk has been relatively neglected in the health care context. This paper contributes to our understanding of how the complex range of learning and development activities are perceived and articulated, from the perspective of senior managers responsible for HRD.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Nikos Bozionelos

Survivor employees and senior management perceptions of career development issues were examined in a downsizing organization. It emerged that the organization lacked a…

Abstract

Survivor employees and senior management perceptions of career development issues were examined in a downsizing organization. It emerged that the organization lacked a coherent strategy for survivors’ career development. The main career development structure, the performance management and appraisal scheme, was generally viewed as inadequate, while the other structures in place, although generally perceived as useful, were underutilized. A substantial proportion of employees considered lateral moves to potentially undermine advancement and security, and senior management views implied a potential lack of wide managerial support for widespread use of this tool. A senior management attitude for selective career development, targeted on an élite group of key employees, was also detected. The study concluded that proper downsizing planning must include a coherent career development strategy for survivors.

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Career Development International, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Vesa Suutari and Riitta Viitala

The purpose of this paper is to discover the preferences for management development methods used in the development of senior managers, and to discover the perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discover the preferences for management development methods used in the development of senior managers, and to discover the perceived effectiveness, as well as strengths and weaknesses, of different methods.

Design/methodology/approach

The study can be classified as a quantitative internet‐survey study, which also benefits from qualitative data through open‐ended questions. The sample of the study consisted of 2,500 senior managers of which 878 participated in the study.

Findings

The results indicate that the dominance of traditional short‐term management development activities continues while more longitudinal methods emphasizing experience‐based learning were reported to be more effective in supporting the development of senior managers. In addition, various key strengths and weaknesses of different methods were identified.

Research limitations/implications

In future research, more in‐depth and longitudinal qualitative analysis of different management development methods would be useful to complement the understanding of such methods and their effectiveness.

Practical implications

Through the empirical analysis of the effectiveness of the management development methods, as well as their strengths and weaknesses, the paper provides useful information to organizations and experts about providing management development programs at the senior management level.

Originality/value

The paper provides latest information concerning the use of different management development methods, and increases the understanding about the characteristics and effectiveness of different management development methods at the senior management level.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1979

L.T. Attwood

The stimulus for the research on which this monograph is based came from Digman's work [1] “How Well‐managed Organisations Develop Their Executives” and from an expression…

Abstract

The stimulus for the research on which this monograph is based came from Digman's work [1] “How Well‐managed Organisations Develop Their Executives” and from an expression of interest at Cranfield in establishing data from British companies.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 3 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Tim R.V. Davis

Managers and human resourcespecialists often prefer a particularapproach to the delivery of training anddevelopment above all others.Frequently, this approach is…

Abstract

Managers and human resource specialists often prefer a particular approach to the delivery of training and development above all others. Frequently, this approach is advocated as a blanket solution to a firm′s managerial problems with little consideration of other approaches. The strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches to management development are evaluated and their application for developing different levels of management in small and large companies is discussed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Donald J. Savoie

For a variety of reasons, public management development policieshave become the fad in many Western industrialised countries in recentyears. As governments move to see…

Abstract

For a variety of reasons, public management development policies have become the fad in many Western industrialised countries in recent years. As governments move to see their operations managed other than simply administered, they are looking for ways to provide new management skills to their managers. In addition, senior government officials themselves see management development programmes as a way to strengthen the corporate culture and purpose of public bureaucracies. Attempts at launching new public management policies in several OECD countries are reviewed. The purpose is to draw out the similarities and differences in the approaches being tried. It is revealed that there are a great deal of similarities. For one thing, governments are looking inside their operations for solutions rather than turning to universities or the private sector. For another, the standard lecture approach to teaching has lost much of its appeal in the new programmes. In some instances, participants from the private sector are invited to attend the new courses.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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