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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

S. G. Hong, S. Trimi and D. W. Kim

– The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of smartphone use on the internet literacy and use by senior citizens.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of smartphone use on the internet literacy and use by senior citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical study.

Findings

The results indicate that the use of smartphones does significantly impact the internet literacy and use of older individuals. Educational background and the duration of smartphone use enhance the ability of seniors to use the internet.

Research limitations/implications

A similar study can be conducted in other different countries and see the effect (if any) of national cultures and the type/purpose of usage of the internet; an expansion of this research, with a larger sample size, and more variables would shed greater insight on this important topic.

Practical implications

Study provide suggestions to governments, in cooperation with the private sectors, on how to diminish the digital divide for senior citizens not only to improve their well-being, but also because seniors are an important resource that contributes to society financially and intellectually.

Social implications

Technology is an important factor that can be used to not only alleviate some of the burden and improve the quality of life of senior citizens, but it can also help increase seniors’ contributions to the society.

Originality/value

This study contributes in the digital divide research: (digital divide) for senior citizens, contributing factors, and the importance of decreasing it.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Liqun Xiang, Ann T.W. Yu, Yongtao Tan, Xuezhu Shan and QiPing Shen

This study aims to identify senior citizens’ requirements related to “embedded retirement facilities (ERFs)”, which are small-scale, multi-functional and community-based…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify senior citizens’ requirements related to “embedded retirement facilities (ERFs)”, which are small-scale, multi-functional and community-based care facilities for senior citizens in mainland China, and to discuss whether senior citizens’ perceptions are influenced by their backgrounds.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire type of research was administrated to gain senior citizens’ rankings of services that should be provided by ERFs. Non-parametric statistical models were applied to analyse the collected data.

Findings

Results reveal that health care services for senior citizens are considered the most important. Requirements regarding rehabilitation and entertainment and daily life assistance are ranked second and third, respectively. Culture-related activities are the least important. Differences in the senior citizens’ background also influence their choices.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on a questionnaire survey completed in northeast China. Opinions from other areas of mainland China will be collected in the future study. Furthermore, the key items identified in this research, which was completed by participants from the built environment discipline, can be further elaborated by combining interdisciplinary feedback.

Practical implications

This study explores services that are supposedly provided by ERFs. Findings will provide useful perceptions from senior citizens and will enable decision makers to prioritise services for senior citizens.

Social implications

Although senior citizens are the end users of ERFs, their needs are easily overlooked. This study calls attention to their needs from ERFs, and the results are likely to serve as references for stakeholders in building improved facilities.

Originality/value

ERFs have been provided in mainland China to cater to senior citizens’ needs since 2014. However, few studies have identified senior citizens’ requirements for provided services. The survey-based results of this work will serve as references for various stakeholders in making enhanced decisions.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Primoz Juznic, Maja Blazic, Tanja Mercun, Barbara Plestenjak and Darko Majcenovic

In our modern society there is a prevailing belief that computers and the internet are mainly used by younger generations, who grew up with modern technology, and are…

Abstract

Purpose

In our modern society there is a prevailing belief that computers and the internet are mainly used by younger generations, who grew up with modern technology, and are generally all information literate. However, research shows that through the past ten years more and more older people have started to learn how to use computers and, of course, how to use the internet. The aim of this paper is to investigate and analyse internet usage among seniors on the basis of a case study showing the actual situation in Slovenia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was carried out among seniors, the participants of different Third Age University programmes, by using a questionnaire, designed for this study. This particular group of seniors was chosen because they lead more active lifestyle than average seniors and the results should be more relevant. Participating in these programmes means they are eager to learn new things and that they have access to computers.

Findings

It was found that among the seniors, Third Age University participants, only one third were active internet users. It was less than expected, as Slovenia has quite high internet usage among its citizens. Education and partly age were important factors in defining internet use. Public libraries can play a particularly important role in offering information literacy courses, offering space and others services to them, but this was not confirmed by the results of this study.

Research limitations/implications

The paper tried to establish the situation with a case study in Slovenia, a new EU member but also one of the European countries with the greatest use of internet and web. Digital divide, differences along the criteria of age, might be more important than elsewhere.

Originality/value

Use of internet and web will become more and more wide‐spread and problems with social groups left out will be more visible and will have negative implications on equality of all citizens. Seniors as a social group are especially vulnerable and need help. Libraries can and must find new services with initiatives that promote the reduction of digital divide among age groups.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

James E. Larsen and Joseph W. Coleman

Researchers have previously examined, with mixed results, whether experience in the single-family house market enhances a buyer's bargaining power by comparing prices paid…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have previously examined, with mixed results, whether experience in the single-family house market enhances a buyer's bargaining power by comparing prices paid by relatively young first-time buyers and experienced buyers. The present study aims to extend this basic line of inquiry, but the focus here is on both buyers and sellers at the other end of the age spectrum as the authors investigate the bargaining power of senior citizens (age 65 or older) in the single-family house market.

Design/methodology/approach

Hedonic regression is used to analyze approximately 6,200 transactions that occurred in Montgomery County, Ohio during the years 2007 through 2009.

Findings

No difference is discovered between prices paid for a single-family house by senior citizens and other buyers in the sample. However, senior citizens in this study sold property for 5.9 percent less than other sellers, ceteris paribus, suggesting that when they sold their homes, other factors put seniors at a bargaining power disadvantage.

Research limitations/implications

Data limitations prevent the authors from specifying the precise reasons underlying the results concerning senior house sellers, but numerous possibilities are presented. Testing whether the results apply in other local housing markets would be a valuable extension of this research, as would identification of the factors associate with any bargaining power imbalance.

Practical implications

The economic principle of substitution suggests that assets that provide identical utility should command identical prices, but for heterogeneous goods the relative bargaining power of the principals may be important in the price formation process. The present study offers interesting results that in the case of senior buyers support the law of one price, but in the case of senior sellers, bargaining power differences dominate.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate bargaining power in residential real estate markets by comparing transaction prices involving senior citizens and other buyers and sellers.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

David Wright

This purpose of this paper is to identify principal stakeholders and needs in e‐inclusion, with particular reference to senior citizens, determining to what extent those…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to identify principal stakeholders and needs in e‐inclusion, with particular reference to senior citizens, determining to what extent those needs are being met or could be met by other stakeholders. It considers inclusive stakeholder organisational structures that could address unmet needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Although the European Commission (EC), Member States, local authorities, industry, and researchers have called for greater collaboration and partnerships among stakeholders to overcome the so‐called digital divides, little attention has been giv]en to the form of collaboration. Reviewing various policy‐oriented documents, this paper compiles a list of principal stakeholders and their e‐inclusion needs, reviews existing multi‐stakeholder undertakings and partnership structures as candidates for addressing needs not already met.

Findings

Many important e‐inclusion needs are not addressed by any multi‐stakeholder undertaking. Some structured collaboration or partnership should address those needs. A new structure should not merely represent all interested stakeholders, but involve them in decision‐making processes.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper, constrained by length from producing a detailed list of needs. Similarly, although the paper identifies 12 different stakeholder categories, some could be further segmented.

Practical implications

Further research and analysis could be undertaken sourcing each identified need, perhaps adding others and further segmenting stakeholder categories.

Originality/value

The paper is of value to stakeholders involved or interested in e‐inclusion efforts. It uses a novel, straight‐forward, approach for identifying stakeholders and needs, who can meet those needs and who is addressing those needs.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

Vahap Uysal and Seth Hoelscher

Local investors have the ability to impact the stock prices and returns of local firms. However, the impact of news made by a firm on local investors and neighboring…

Abstract

Purpose

Local investors have the ability to impact the stock prices and returns of local firms. However, the impact of news made by a firm on local investors and neighboring companies is absent from the academic literature. The purpose of this paper is to fill that void and examine how a local investor clientele affects the stock market reactions of firms located within the same geographic proximity as a news-generating firm.

Design/methodology/approach

After accounting for firm, industry, and geographic characteristics, this study examines how a firm’s dividend initiation announcement (positive news) influences stock prices of seemingly unrelated firms within the same metropolitan statistical area (MSA).

Findings

Dividend-paying firms located in areas with a higher percentage of dividend clientele experience a positive comovement reaction when a seemingly unrelated firm within the same MSA announces a dividend initiation. The positive reactions are specifically for dividend-paying firms, while non-dividend payers exhibit no significant response. These results are robust to numerous regression methods and alternative explanations.

Practical implications

These findings are consistent with the positive-investor-attention hypothesis, suggesting positive spillover effects from news announcements for other local firms in the presence of individual investor clientele.

Originality/value

This is the first study to link how news generated by one firm can influence other geographically local firms, providing evidence on the impact of individual investor clientele on stock returns of local non-news firms.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Martin Lohmann and Guido Merzbach

There is no doubt: the “Senior Citizens Market” is growing all over Europe. Thus, designing specific marketing strategies and adapting the tourist product to the…

Abstract

There is no doubt: the “Senior Citizens Market” is growing all over Europe. Thus, designing specific marketing strategies and adapting the tourist product to the prospective needs of elderly tourists are becoming more and more important.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Stephen Meyers

Purpose: Researchers and advocates alike have noted that persons with disabilities and older persons are the two groups most marginalized by neoliberal economic policies…

Abstract

Purpose: Researchers and advocates alike have noted that persons with disabilities and older persons are the two groups most marginalized by neoliberal economic policies and therefore could come together as a broad-based movement against the roll back of their rights. Yet, these two groups fail to collaborate, and instead compete against one another for an ever-shrinking pool of benefits. This chapter explores the barriers to their collaboration within the context of structural adjustment in Jamaica.

Methods/Approach: The author engages in a critical analysis of neoliberalism's effect on the advocacy strategies of the disability and older persons' movements in Jamaica based on 32 semi-directed depth interviews, participant observation of numerous events, and a survey of media written by local advocates.

Findings: The disability movement makes claims on behalf of their members by focusing on the potential returns that society will gain by providing the opportunities that will make young persons with disabilities productive employees over their lifetime. The older persons' movement advocates by portraying themselves as “vibrant” and worthy of social investment because of the contributions they make. Both of these arguments for inclusion are also exclusionary. The disability movement excludes older persons as potential contributors and the older persons' movement similarly excludes persons with disabilities.

Implications: The only way neoliberalism will successfully be rolled back and universal rights returned is if the disability movement and older persons' movements build an alliance that is more inclusive, including of one another, by rejecting the language of investment and productivity, and instead focus on rights and inherent dignity.

Details

Disability Alliances and Allies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-322-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1979

Renee Feinberg and Rita Auerbach

It is customary these days to denounce our society for its unconscionable neglect of the elderly, while we look back romantically to some indeterminate past when the…

Abstract

It is customary these days to denounce our society for its unconscionable neglect of the elderly, while we look back romantically to some indeterminate past when the elderly were respected and well cared for. Contrary to this popular view, old people historically have enjoyed neither respect nor security. As Simone de Beauvoir so effectively demonstrates in The Coming of Age (New York: Putnam, 1972), the elderly have been almost universally ill‐treated by societies throughout the world. Even the Hebrew patriarchs admonished their children to remember them as they grew older: “Cast me not off in time of old age; when my strength fails, forsake me not” (Psalms 71:1). Primitive agrarian cultures, whose very existence depended upon the knowledge gleaned from experience, valued their elders, but even they were often moved by the harsh conditions of subsistence living to eliminate by ritual killing those who were no longer productive members of society. There was a softening of societal attitudes toward the elderly during the period of nineteenth century industrial capitalism, which again valued experience and entrepreneurial skills. Modern technocratic society, however, discredits the idea that knowledge accumulates with age and prefers to think that it grows out‐of‐date. “The vast majority of mankind,” writes de Beauvoir, “look upon the coming of old age with sorrow and rebellion. It fills them with more aversion than death itself.” That the United States in the twentieth century is not alone in its poor treatment of the aged does not excuse or explain this neglect. Rather, the pervasiveness of prejudice against the old makes it even more imperative that we now develop programs to end age discrimination and its vicious effects.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

Felicia A. Barrett

The purpose of this paper is to provide an annotated listing of studies that focus on older adults and, second, to describe methods by which librarians can provide the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an annotated listing of studies that focus on older adults and, second, to describe methods by which librarians can provide the necessary tools needed to identify quality web sites that provide reliable health information found on the internet. Individuals are taking more interest in their own health care. The internet is becoming an increasingly important and influential source of health information for the public. Unlike some of the traditional approaches to acquiring health information in the past, the internet is accessible 24/7 to anyone who owns a computer and has an internet connection.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a review of the literature that examines how older adults search for health information on the internet and what assistance they need is conducted. Several criteria are used to identify the works that are included in this annotated bibliography. In total, 24 studies meet the criteria.

Findings

Older adults are rapidly becoming the fastest growing group of users of the web. Librarians can play a major role in assisting older consumers locate health information on the internet.

Originality/value

This annotated bibliography provides information about connecting the elderly to quality health information found on the web. Many projects and concepts are discussed. The studies included offer constructive assistance on how to provide programs that will help educate users to become more involved in the health care decision‐making process.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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