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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Don MacMillan

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Reference Reviews, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Siu Mee Cheng and Cristina Catallo

The purpose of this paper is to develop a case definition of integrated health and social services initiatives that serve older adults, and will provide characteristics to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a case definition of integrated health and social services initiatives that serve older adults, and will provide characteristics to aid in the identification of such initiatives. The case definition is intended to ease the identification of integrated health and social care initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A limited search was undertaken of both scientific and gray literature that documented and/or examined integrated health and social services initiatives. In addition, literature on well-documented and generally accepted integrated healthcare and social services models that reflect collaborations from healthcare and social services organizations that support older adults was also used to develop the case definition.

Findings

The case definition is as follows: healthcare organizations from across the continuum of care working together with social services organizations, so that services are complementary and coordinated in a seamless and unified system, with care continuity for the patient/client in order to achieve desired health outcomes within a holistic perspective; the initiatives comprise at least one healthcare organization and one social care organization; and these initiatives possess 18 characteristics, grouped under 9 themes: patient care approach; program goals; measurement; service and care quality; accountability and responsibility; information sharing; culture; leadership; and staff and professional interaction.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that the characteristics are based on a limited literature search. The quality of some of the literature both gray and published was not definitive: information on how they undertook the literature search was not provided; exclusion and inclusion criteria were not included; and there was insufficient detail on the design of the studies included. Furthermore, the literature reviews are based on integrated initiatives that target both seniors and non-senior’s based services. The cross-section of initiatives studied is also different in scale and type, and these differences were not explored.

Practical implications

The case definition is a useful tool in aiding to further the understanding of integrated health and social care initiatives. The number of definitions that exist for integrated health and social care initiatives can make it confusing to clearly understand this field and topic. The characteristics identified can assist in providing greater clarity and understanding on health and social care integration.

Originality/value

This study provides greater coherence in the literature on health and social care integration. It aids in better framing the phenomenon of healthcare and social services integration, thereby enhancing understanding. Finally, the study provides a very useful and concrete list of identifying characteristics, to aid in identifying integrated health and social care initiatives that serve older adults.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

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53

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International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

John Murnane

This research project investigated practical aspects of teaching older, retired people to use the Internet, with particular emphasis on email. The study was carried out in…

Abstract

This research project investigated practical aspects of teaching older, retired people to use the Internet, with particular emphasis on email. The study was carried out in Melbourne, Australia. This paper deals with the justification for the research, its aims, objectives and mid‐term results. A small number of residents in retirement accommodation, aged 84‐97, have been tutored on a one‐to‐one basis to use email and other computer/Internet applications. Though several endemic hurdles have been experienced, the research shows the benefits of email and ways to overcome some of the problems.

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Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Donald Haurin and Stephanie Moulton

This paper links the literatures on the life-cycle hypothesis, homeownership, home equity and pensions. Empirically, the focus is on the EU and USA. The paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper links the literatures on the life-cycle hypothesis, homeownership, home equity and pensions. Empirically, the focus is on the EU and USA. The paper aims to explore the extent that seniors extract their home equity and discuss the financial instruments available for equity extraction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses data from the EU and USA to determine homeownership rates, house values and mortgage debt. With these values, the amount of seniors’ home equity is measured for each country. The usage of home equity extraction methods is reported and factors limiting their use are identified.

Findings

Seniors’ home equity is a substantial share of their total wealth. Estimates for 2013 are that their home equity equals about €5tn in the USA and over €8tn in large EU countries. The authors find that only a small share of seniors extracts their home equity. While there are supply side constraints in many countries, the evidence suggests that the cause of low extraction rates is the lack of demand. Various reasons for the lack of demand are discussed.

Practical implications

The increasing share of seniors in most countries’ population suggests that there will be increasing pressure on public pension systems. One among many options to address this issue is to impose a wealth test for eligibility, where wealth includes home equity. This study suggests that although home equity is substantial for many seniors, they are reluctant to access the funds.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of home equity in the EU and USA and the factors that affect the primary methods of extraction.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Liz Lloyd, Albert Banerjee, Charlene Harrington, Frode F. Jacobsen and Marta Szebehely

– This study aims to explore the causes and consequences of media scandals involving nursing homes for older persons in Canada, Norway, Sweden, the UK and the USA.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the causes and consequences of media scandals involving nursing homes for older persons in Canada, Norway, Sweden, the UK and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a descriptive case-study methodology which provides an in-depth, focused, qualitative analysis of one selected nursing home scandal in each jurisdiction. Scandals were selected on the basis of being substantive enough to potentially affect policy. An international comparative perspective was adopted to consider whether and how different social, political and economic contexts might shape scandals and their consequences.

Findings

This study found that for-profit residential care provision as well as international trends in the ownership and financing of nursing homes were factors in the emergence of all media scandals, as was investigative reporting and a lack of consensus around the role of the state in the delivery of residential care. All scandals resulted in government action but such action generally avoided addressing underlying structural conditions.

Research limitations/implications

This study examines only the short-term effects of five media scandals.

Originality/value

While there has been longstanding recognition of the importance of scandals to the development of residential care policy, there have been few studies that have systematically examined the causes and consequences of such scandals. This paper contributes to a research agenda that more fully considers the media's role in the development of residential care policy, attending to both its promises and shortcomings.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Reza Etemad-Sajadi and Gil Gomes Dos Santos

The objective of this paper is to focus on seniors’ acceptance of the usage of connected healthcare technologies in their homes. The authors integrated into technology…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to focus on seniors’ acceptance of the usage of connected healthcare technologies in their homes. The authors integrated into technology acceptance model (TAM) several latent variables such as social presence, trust and degree of intrusiveness perceived with the use of connected health technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors distributed the survey by post to 605 seniors. The authors targeted elderly people using connected health technologies (assistive alarm, telecare, sensors, etc.) at home and/or receiving healthcare at home. The authors received 213 questionnaires back. As The authors had several latent variables, the authors used partial least squares (PLS), a variance-based structural equation modeling method.

Findings

The results show that the level of trust in these technologies impacts significantly the perception of usefulness and the degree of intrusiveness. In parallel, the degree of usefulness of these technologies impacts positively elderly people’s intention to accept their usage. Finally, one can claim that the perception of the social presence with the use of these technologies impacts positively the degree of perceived usefulness, trust and intrusiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The sample covers a population benefiting from similar connected health technologies. It was difficult to distinguish and interpret the added value of each technology separately. As more and more elderly people use or are least familiarizing themselves with a range of connected technologies it would be interesting to identify which sets of connected technologies contribute the most to a positive feeling of social presence.

Social implications

These results are particularly relevant to stakeholders in the health industry in their quest to improve their products/services. A better understanding of the relation that the elderly have with connected health technologies is an essential prerequisite to supporting the development of new solutions capable of meeting the specific needs of our seniors.

Originality/value

The authors want to apply the TAM to connected health technologies designed for elderly people and the authors also want to extend it by integrating the social presence, trust and degree of intrusiveness variables to our research model.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Aron Perenyi, Roxanne Zolin and Alex Maritz

Why is self-employment an attractive option for certain seniors and what drives seniors into business start-ups? In this study, the motivations and preferences of senior…

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Purpose

Why is self-employment an attractive option for certain seniors and what drives seniors into business start-ups? In this study, the motivations and preferences of senior entrepreneurs in Australia, to become self-employed, by means of business start-ups, are explored. The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical basis for policy implications.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods study is conducted. Members of the National Senior’s Association in Australia were interviewed and surveyed. The semi-structured interviews identified the key factors influencing senior entrepreneurs in relation to self-employment and entrepreneurial choices at a later career stage. The survey collected information on intentionality, motivation, skills, opportunities, success, satisfaction, participation, barriers, benefits, education and training, and perceptions of policy support for senior entrepreneurs.

Findings

Respondents gave an account of the prevalence of pull factors motivating their choice of an entrepreneurial career. Multivariate statistical analysis of survey responses showed that senior entrepreneurs are more driven by opportunity than necessity and are primarily internally motivated.

Research limitations/implications

Results of this study suggest a weak link between motivation by others and the act of start-up, but this may also imply that those seniors who are more likely to become entrepreneurs are more likely to ignore the impulses from their social context. This requires further investigation to ensure a robust identification of drivers and an elimination of contextual effects. Further research is suggested to compose a relevant model structure in different contexts and a representative sample to confirm the model outcomes.

Originality/value

This is the first mixed methods study of the antecedents of senior entrepreneurs’ start-up intentions in Australia. The study also uses entrepreneurial activity as opposed to intention as its dependent variable, which allows for a more accurate evaluation of antecedents to the senior entrepreneurship phenomenon.

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International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Judith Sixsmith, Mei Lan Fang, Ryan Woolrych, Sarah L. Canham, Lupin Battersby and Andrew Sixsmith

The provision of home and community supports can enable people to successfully age-in-place by improving physical and mental health, supporting social participation and…

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1420

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Purpose

The provision of home and community supports can enable people to successfully age-in-place by improving physical and mental health, supporting social participation and enhancing independence, autonomy and choice. One challenge concerns the integration of place-based supports available as older people transition into affordable housing. Sustainable solutions need to be developed and implemented with the full involvement of communities, service organizations and older people themselves. Partnership building is an important component of this process. The purpose of this paper is to detail the intricacies of developing partnerships with low-income older people, local service providers and nonprofit housing associations in the context of a Canadian housing development.

Design/methodology/approach

A community-based participatory approach was used to inform the data collection and partnership building process. The partnership building process progressed through a series of democratized committee meetings based on the principles of appreciative inquiry, four collaboration cafés with nonprofit housing providers and four community mapping workshops with low-income older people. Data collection also involved 25 interviews and 15 photovoice sessions with the housing tenants. The common aims of partnership and data collection were to understand the challenges and opportunities experienced by older people, service providers and nonprofit housing providers; identify the perspectives of service providers and nonprofit housing providers for the provision and delivery of senior-friendly services and resources; and determine actions that can be undertaken to better meet the needs of service providers and nonprofit housing providers in order to help them serve older people better.

Findings

The partnership prioritized the generation of a shared vision together with shared values, interests and the goal of co-creating meaningful housing solutions for older people transitioning into affordable housing. Input from interviews and photovoice sessions with older people provided material to inform decision making in support of ageing well in the right place. Attention to issues of power dynamics and knowledge generation and feedback mechanisms enable all fields of expertise to be taken into account, including the experiential expertise of older residents. This resulted in functional, physical, psychological and social aspects of ageing in place to inform the new build housing complex.

Research limitations/implications

The time and effort required to conduct democratized partnerships slowed the decision-making process.

Originality/value

The findings confirm that the drive toward community partnerships is a necessary process in supporting older people to age well in the right place. This requires sound mechanisms to include the voice of older people themselves alongside other relevant stakeholders. Ageing well in a housing complex requires meaningful placemaking to include the functional, physical, psychological and social aspects of older people’s everyday life in respect to both home and community.

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Working with Older People, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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