Search results

1 – 10 of over 7000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2011

Tommy Tsung Ying Shih

Researchers continue to seek understanding of industrialization as a state managed process. How to create and implement new industries based on advanced knowledge is on…

Abstract

Researchers continue to seek understanding of industrialization as a state managed process. How to create and implement new industries based on advanced knowledge is on the policy agenda of many advanced nations. Measures that promote these developments include national capacity building in science and technology, the formation of technology transfer systems, and the establishment of industrial clusters. What these templates often overlook is an analysis of use. This chapter aims to increase the understanding of the processes that embed new solutions in structures from an industrial network perspective. The chapter describes an empirical study of high-technology industrialization in Taiwan that the researcher conducts to this end. The study shows that the Taiwanese industrial model is oversimplified and omits several important factors in the development of new industries. This study bases its findings on the notions that resource combination occurs in different time and space, the new always builds on existing resource structures, and the users are important as active participants in development processes.

Details

Interfirm Networks: Theory, Strategy, and Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-024-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2004

Jeffrey T. Macher and David C. Mowery

We examine the evolution of vertical specialization in three industries: chemicals, computers, and semiconductors. Vertical specialization is the restructuring of…

Abstract

We examine the evolution of vertical specialization in three industries: chemicals, computers, and semiconductors. Vertical specialization is the restructuring of industry-wide value chains, such that different stages are controlled by different firms, rather than being vertically integrated within the boundaries of individual firms. In some cases, vertical specialization may span international boundaries and is associated with complex international production networks. After decades of vertical specialization, firms in the chemical industry are re-integrating stages of the value chain. By contrast, the semiconductor and computer industries have experienced significant vertical specialization during the past ten years. We examine how and why these contrasting trends in vertical specialization have co-evolved with industry maturation and decline, and underscore the importance and role of both industry factors and business strategies necessary for industries to become more specialized. We also consider the effects of vertical specialization on the sources of innovation and the geographic redistribution of production and other activities. We conclude that the evolution of vertical specialization in these three industries has both reflected and influenced the strategies of leading firms, while also displays industry-specific characteristics that are rooted in different technological and market characteristics.

Details

Business Strategy over the Industry Lifecycle
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-135-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Yung‐Ta Li, Mu‐Hsuan Huang and Dar‐Zen Chen

Foundry, Design House, and integrated device manufacturers (IDM) are major characters in the semiconductor industry value chain. The purpose of this paper is to discuss…

Downloads
2332

Abstract

Purpose

Foundry, Design House, and integrated device manufacturers (IDM) are major characters in the semiconductor industry value chain. The purpose of this paper is to discuss patterns of characters' evolution in technology through patents classified as wafer‐design application patents and wafer‐process patents.

Design/methodology/approach

Various patent indicators, such as average patent citation count, and the combination of the average patent citation count and relative patent count share were used to measure the patent activity, patent quality, and the combination of the patent quality and relative patent activity share, respectively. The study period (1979‐2009) was divided into three major technology or wafer size eras, 1979‐1991 for the 6‐ and pre 6‐inch wafer era, 1989‐1999 for the 8‐inch wafer era, and 1997‐2009 for the 12‐inch wafer era.

Findings

Foundry has gradually become the technology transferor rather than purely the manufacturing capacity provider. Foundry's impact on the technology level has risen steeply on both the wafer‐process technology fields and the wafer‐design application technology fields. As a result, IDM, traditionally considered the primary technology contributor in the semiconductor value chain for the past 30 years, will continue to be challenged in the semiconductor industry.

Practical implications

Some hypotheses are clarified to provide managerial implications for the semiconductor industry. Owing to Foundry's rise in technology activity and quality, IDM/Design House should not merely view it as one of their capacity providers but should also pursue a technology alliance with it.

Originality/value

The paper clarifies the traditional hypotheses of the characters of technology in the semiconductor value chain.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Der Chao Chen and Ryoko Toyama

This study aims to discuss the development of the semiconductor industry in China and analyzes it through current studies about the catch up of latecomers in newly…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss the development of the semiconductor industry in China and analyzes it through current studies about the catch up of latecomers in newly industrialized countries (NICs).

Design/methodology/approach

Use the case study approach to explore and discuss the development track of the Chinese semiconductor industry and the catch up experience of Huang Hong NEC in China.

Findings

The experience of NICs can explain the catch up of semiconductor latecomers in China. However, the role of government has changed along with the whole development of the China semiconductor industry; external pressure may influence the pace of development and the span of control of the China Government for future catch ups.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on one single case, which may not reflect the individual differences appeared in different firms in China.

Originality/value

This study contributes to our knowledge about the catch up of latecomer firms in an emerging market and verifies classical arguments about the experience of NICs through the experience of China's semiconductor industry.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Yue Zhang, Jiang Yu and Yanmei Liu

The purpose of this paper is to explain how institutional elements and market conditions shape and then reshape the development of high‐tech industries in large emerging countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how institutional elements and market conditions shape and then reshape the development of high‐tech industries in large emerging countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a new framework to assess the impact of market and institutions on the high‐tech industry evolution in large emerging economies such as China. The qualitative approach based on historical data and interviews are provided to support the framework.

Findings

The framework and empirical research suggest that the institution systems and market dynamics will interact and influence the transformation process of industrial structure and the strategic choice of partnership arrangement between the domestic and foreign firms. The complementary assets which are considered as proxy to the resource accessibility in the market are also identified in the framework and it was verified in the case study.

Practical implications

This study has important implications for business strategy in emerging economies. The authors' observations indicate building close ties with domestic firms is an important asset to minimize the liability of foreignness for multinational firms. The paper has alluded to co‐evolutionary dynamics in the development of high‐tech industry in China by linking market initiative with institutional environment.

Originality/value

First, the study contributes to institutional‐based view of business strategy by explaining the choice of strategic partnerships between indigenous and foreign players arising from institutional and market considerations. Second, the study extends our understanding of technological catch up in newly‐industrializing countries by showing the interrelation between market elements and institutional arrangements and the corresponding changes to meet technological development needs.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

G.W. Griffiths

Whatever one may feel is the importance of particular interconnection and assembly technologies with which one is associated, Thin Film or Thick Film Hybrid, PCB Through…

Abstract

Whatever one may feel is the importance of particular interconnection and assembly technologies with which one is associated, Thin Film or Thick Film Hybrid, PCB Through Hole, Surface Mounting, etc., the driving force in electronics is the high degree of low cost functionality brought by semiconductor technology. However, semiconductor science cannot provide systems solutions on its own and needs to be combined with suitable interconnection and assembly technologies to bring its potential processing power to fulfilment. Hybrid technology holds a key role in the use of silicon in overall system integration. On hybrid substrates semiconductors can be applied in any of the forms available, from bare dice to encapsulated, tested and burnt‐in complex functions in LSI. Over the years hybrids have developed, needing semiconductors as the active elements in providing functional modules. The relationship between the technologies has been close but not always in perfect harmony at the commercial interfaces. The first part of this paper reviews development of semiconductors in relation to the forms of packaging available for application in hybrid assembly including the emergent means being adopted to tackle the problems of ever increasing lead counts that will be with us for some time until the dream of total self‐sufficiency on silicon becomes a reality. The second part of the paper reviews silicon design options with the emphasis on the relevance of combining silicon implementation with hybrid methods.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Benjamin J.C. Yuan, John Chih‐Hung Hsieh and Champion Wang

This paper explores the possible future business environment, industrial structure, technological transformation, and market for the semiconductor industry in Taiwan.

Downloads
1129

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the possible future business environment, industrial structure, technological transformation, and market for the semiconductor industry in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the Delphi method to predict future trends in Taiwan's semiconductor industry in 2015.

Findings

The significant findings are as follows: the future business environment will focus on “industrial internationalization” and “strategic alliance”, and roughly half of Taiwan's production will move to China by 2015; the disintegrated model in Taiwan's semiconductor industry will still remain by 2015 and will require some adjustments, whereas the foundry service in Taiwan will retain its dominance globally; future core technologies in 2015 will comprise low voltage manufacturing (CMOS), High K, nanotechnology processes, and copper interconnection processes; the estimated value of IC industrial production for 2005 was US$32.1 billion, and will be US$61.0 billion in 2010 and US$108.8 billion in 2015.

Originality/value

This research can be utilized as a reference for government, academics, industry, and international investors.

Details

Foresight, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2020

Patrick Hickey and Eugene Kozlovski

The paper presents one of the first attempts to identify and categorise the fundamental barriers currently preventing the multibillion semiconductor equipment…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper presents one of the first attempts to identify and categorise the fundamental barriers currently preventing the multibillion semiconductor equipment manufacturing industry from implementing existing B2B e-trading models for its secondary market. It furthermore proposes a global e-business strategy supporting aftermarket integration with the industry's supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

Because of the global nature of the industry, the research employs a multiple case-study design to explore the state-of-the-art in semiconductor excess management. The data for this analysis are obtained through a number of in-depth interviews with experts from a cross-section of the industry, and further supplemented and validated with a systematic literature review and public corporate data.

Findings

The results indicate that significant market imperfections still exist in the industry due to information and knowledge deficits, organisational inefficiency and IP-related concerns. The considerable levels of third-party competition to the original equipment manufacturers raise questions about the existence and efficacy of reverse logistics processes and Closed-Loop Supply Chain (CLSC) management strategies in this industry. It has been shown that a leaner semiconductor supply chain is achievable through the implementation of the proposed B2B e-marketplace, maintaining the information exchange on the surplus/obsolete equipment and parts.

Originality/value

These outcomes are unique for supporting the design of the first global e-marketplace for the secondary semiconductor equipment and spares. The results can, furthermore, inform the standardisation of the semiconductor aftermarket transactions, streamline knowledge exchange mechanisms amongst different industry players and improve pricing strategies. These contribute to knowledge of principles allowing the aftermarket e-trading to become a key part of the value network in high-tech manufacturing industries.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

Downloads
5223

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 September 2009

Bronwyn H. Hall and Rosemarie H. Ziedonis

We examine the patenting behavior of firms in an industry characterized by rapid technological change and cumulative innovation. Recent survey evidence suggests that…

Abstract

We examine the patenting behavior of firms in an industry characterized by rapid technological change and cumulative innovation. Recent survey evidence suggests that semiconductor firms do not rely heavily on patents to appropriate returns to R&D. Yet the propensity of semiconductor firms to patent has risen dramatically since the mid-1980s. We explore this apparent paradox by conducting interviews with industry representatives and analyzing the patenting behavior of 95 U.S. semiconductor firms during 1979–1995. The results suggest that the 1980s strengthening of U.S. patent rights spawned “patent portfolio races” among capital-intensive firms, but it also facilitated entry by specialized design firms.

Details

Economic Institutions of Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-487-0

1 – 10 of over 7000