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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Ortrun Zuber-Skerritt and Selva Abraham

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework for work-applied learning (WAL) that fosters the development of managers and other professionals as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework for work-applied learning (WAL) that fosters the development of managers and other professionals as lifelong learners and practitioner researchers – through reflective practice, action research, action learning and action leadership, for positive organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework is designed from a holistic, affective-socio-cognitive approach to learning, teaching, research and development. It is based on a phenomenological research paradigm and informed by aspects of various theories, including experiential learning theory, strengths-based theory, grounded theory and critical theory/realism.

Findings

Based on classical and recent literature and the authors’ extensive experience, the WAL model presented here is an effective and practical approach to management education, research and development. It is useful for present and future requirements of business, industry, government and society at large in this twenty-first century, and in pursuit of a world of equality, social justice, sustainable development and quality of life for all. This is because of the nature of the research paradigm, particularly its collaborative and emancipatory processes.

Originality/value

This paper provides a theoretical, pedagogical and methodological rationalisation for WAL. This model is particularly useful for developing individual, team and organisational learning and for cultivating managers – or professional learners generally – as practitioner researchers. These researchers may act as role models of collaborative action leadership in their organisations with a cascading effect. This paper therefore advances an incipient literature on practitioner researchers as action leaders.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Jonathan Garnett, Selva Abraham and Param Abraham

The purpose of this paper is to show how work-based and work-applied learning (WAL) can enhance the intellectual capital of organisations.

2142

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how work-based and work-applied learning (WAL) can enhance the intellectual capital of organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws organisational learning- and work-based learning literature and case study illustrations.

Findings

To achieve major strategic change in organisations requires working at senior level within the organisation to develop the capability of the organisation to learn and apply that learning strategically. WAL is explicitly geared to bring about change and enhance the learning capability within the organisation.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for further longitudinal studies of organisations that have used the work-based and WAL approaches.

Practical implications

The conclusions reached have implications for higher education and non-award bearing executive education.

Social implications

The alignment of individual learning with organisational objectives positions learning as a co-operative part of working life rather than just individual preparation for employment.

Originality/value

The paper positions work-based learning and WAL as appropriate responses to the learning needs of organisations as well as individuals.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2015

Selva Abraham and Jonathan Garnett

583

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Open Access

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Arvind Ashta and Mark Hannam

– The purpose of this paper is to show that the microfinance industry practices can benefit from the culture and spiritual traditions of a country.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that the microfinance industry practices can benefit from the culture and spiritual traditions of a country.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the Bhagavad Gita and the codes of Manu and Kautilya to describe the background of Hindu teaching and practical wisdom. The authors use a case study of a Hindu microfinance institution (MFI).

Findings

The authors find that Indian spirituality is a case-based application of learning through experience.

Research limitations/implications

The case used in this study is one of a religious organization led MFI. It would be interesting to have follow up case studies of for-profit organizations and study their philosophy and links to spiritual traditions.

Practical implications

The authors find that business in general, and MFIs in particular, should adopt risk-based pricing. The specificities of each product, its delivery and price should be based on continuous learning from experience of helping customers. Thus a case-based approach to product development and pricing is required.

Social implications

This paper is a response to the current criticism of microfinance and argues for more tolerance on the part of society and more sensitivity on the part of MFIs. The case study shows that with the right attitude, it is possible to balance societal interests, customer needs and the institution's growth.

Originality/value

This is the first paper on microfinance which looks at outsourcing from a spiritual viewpoint and launches a debate on whether “playing God” is useful.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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