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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Selma Ebrahim

The purpose of this paper is to explore how multi-professional approved clinicians (MPACs), responsible for the care of patients detained under the Mental Health Act (2007), can…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how multi-professional approved clinicians (MPACs), responsible for the care of patients detained under the Mental Health Act (2007), can enable clinical leadership in mental health settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was completed by clinical psychology and mental health nursing practitioners in a mental health trust in the UK working towards or having gained approved clinician (AC) status, identifying barriers to implementation of the roles and enablers. Qualitative interview data were also gathered with psychiatrists, clinical psychologist and Mental Health Nurse ACs (three in each group).

Findings

There are a number of barriers and enablers of distributed leadership promoted by the MPAC role. Themes identified focused on enabling person-centred care, clinical leadership and culture change more broadly within mental health care. The AC role is supporting clinical leadership by a range of professionals, promoting patient choice by enabling access to clinicians with the appropriate skills to meet needs. Clinical leadership roles are promoting links between organisational priorities, teams and patient care, fostering distributed leadership in practice.

Research limitations/implications

This project reflects the views of a limited number of practitioners within one organisation which limits generalisabilty.

Practical implications

Organisations need clear strategies linked to workforce development and implementation of the roles to capitalise on their potential to support clinical leadership and person-centred care.

Originality/value

This study provides initial qualitative data on potential benefits and challenges of implementing the role.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 April 2018

Selma Ebrahim, Angela Glascott, Heidi Mayer and Elodie Gair

Recovery Colleges are education-based mental health resources, utilising practitioner and lived experience expertise, promoting skills to enhance student independence. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Recovery Colleges are education-based mental health resources, utilising practitioner and lived experience expertise, promoting skills to enhance student independence. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of engagement with a Recovery College in Northern England on student wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

Feedback questionnaires were analysed from 89 students attending the Recovery College. Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (SWEMBS) and “Empower Flower” (a measure of personal resources) data for 56 students were compared pre- and post-attendance at courses.

Findings

The SWEMBS and Empower Flower indicated improvements in wellbeing and personal resources pre- to post-attendance at Recovery College courses. Satisfaction with the service was high. Students saw the service as unique, accepting and enabling. Students noted they developed a sense of hope, confidence and aspirations. They related this to practical changes, e.g. increasing work-related activity and decreasing service use.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests that there is a need for further evaluation of the unique contribution that Recovery Colleges can make to mental wellbeing, and the mechanisms involved in promoting the process of recovery.

Practical implications

The Recovery College may be a cost-effective way to provide a supportive recovery-orientated environment which promotes students’ ability to build self-confidence and skills, enabling them to connect with others and progress towards independence and valued goals. This complements more traditional mental health services.

Originality/value

This paper reports on an area of mental health development where there is very limited research, adding valuable data to the literature.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Selma Ebrahim, Sally Robinson, Samantha Crooks, Sari Harenwall and Angus Forsyth

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of knowledge and understanding framework (KUF) awareness-level training with mental health staff in a UK NHS Mental Health…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of knowledge and understanding framework (KUF) awareness-level training with mental health staff in a UK NHS Mental Health Trust.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 181 mental health professionals completed three day KUF awareness-level training to promote understanding and positive attitudes in working with personality disorder (PD). Attitudes to PD were evaluated using the PD – Knowledge and Skills Questionnaire (Bolton et al., 2010) at pre and post training and at three and six months follow up. Quantitative data were analysed and descriptive statistics were obtained. Qualitative methods were also used to evaluate the integration of learning into work-based practice with five participants.

Findings

Participants reported a favourable reaction to the training. Understanding and positive emotions about working with PD increased significantly post training (gains maintained at three and six months follow up). Capability in working with PD was increased post training and at three, but not six months. Qualitative analysis suggests clinical practice was positively impacted upon three months following training.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests awareness-level KUF training can have a positive impact on the attitudes, understanding and clinical practice of mental health practitioners towards people with a PD. It confirms earlier research on a decrease in capability post training, and explores strategies to further develop capability with this client group.

Originality/value

Despite the promotion of KUF awareness-level training by the Department of Health there is limited evaluation of the approach with mental health professionals in practice. This study reports on an evaluation of KUF training within a large mental health trust with three and six months follow up data. Qualitative evaluation three months after course completion indicates improved practice and application of course principles when working with individuals with PD.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Elaine Hatfield, Richard L. Rapson and Victoria Narine

Recently, scholars from a wide variety of disciplines have begun to study the influence of attention, mimicry, and social context on emotional contagion. In this chapter, we will…

Abstract

Recently, scholars from a wide variety of disciplines have begun to study the influence of attention, mimicry, and social context on emotional contagion. In this chapter, we will review the classic evidence documenting the role of these factors in sparking primitive emotional contagion, especially in occupational settings. Then we will discuss the new evidence, which scholars have amassed to help us better understand the role of culture in fostering the ability to read others’ thoughts, feelings, and emotions. Finally, we will briefly speculate as to where future research might be headed.

Details

Individual, Relational, and Contextual Dynamics of Emotions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-844-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2023

Muhammad Rabiu Danlami, Muhamad Abduh and Lutfi Abdul Razak

Islamic banks, despite being Shariah-compliant, have long been criticized for mimicking conventional banks in terms of their products and processes (Khan, 2010; Kuran, 1996)…

Abstract

Purpose

Islamic banks, despite being Shariah-compliant, have long been criticized for mimicking conventional banks in terms of their products and processes (Khan, 2010; Kuran, 1996). However, several Islamic banks do engage in philanthropy (zakat and charity) and risk-sharing financing (mudarabah and musharakah) instruments that better meet their raison d'etre, the fulfillment of Maqasid al-Shariah (Jatmiko et al., 2023). These contracts, however, are more susceptible to moral hazard and adverse selection problems than traditional debt-based finance (Azmat et al., 2015) and may impair Islamic bank stability. This paper explores the relationship between social finance and the stability of Islamic banks, and whether institutional quality moderates this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using hand-collected annual data on social finance from 12 Islamic banks in four countries: Bangladesh, Bahrain, Indonesia and Malaysia, between 2006 and 2019, the authors employ the feasible generalized least squares and the panel-corrected standard errors methods for the analysis. The Stata version 16 software was used to analyze the data for the study.

Findings

The results indicate that mudarabah and musharakah financing raises the stability of Islamic banks. The authors also found that mudarabah and musharakah expose Islamic banks to more risk-taking behavior amidst the conditioning effect of institutional quality. On the other hand, charity induces the stability of Islamic banks, while zakat increases the risk-taking behavior of the banks. Further, when the quality of institutions was used as a moderator, both zakat and charity induced the stability of Islamic banks. The results were robust when liquidity risk was used and partially robust when portfolio risks were employed as measures of stability.

Research limitations/implications

One concern regarding the application of Islamic social finance is that it might be a risky strategy for Islamic banks. In terms of research implications, the available evidence suggests that the use of Islamic social finance instruments is not detrimental to the stability of Islamic banks. Hence, regulators and policymakers should not penalize Islamic banks for using Islamic social finance instruments that help provide financial solutions to the underserved and unserved. In terms of research limitations, the study could not include other relevant Islamic social finance instruments such as waqf and qard al-hassan. Furthermore, data availability restricts the analysis to only 12 Islamic banks in fourcountries. As more Islamic banks in different countries venture into Islamic social finance, and the quantity and quality of information improve, future studies could explore the issue further.

Social implications

The available evidence suggests that the use of Islamic social finance instruments does not worsen the stability of Islamic banks. Given the dominance of sale- and lease-based contracts in Islamic financing (Aggarwal and Yousef, 2000; Šeho et al., 2020), these findings should encourage other Islamic banks to provide financial solutions using other Shariah-compliant contracts including those based on risk-sharing and philanthropy. This would be a better reflection of the Islamic banks’ value proposition as it helps boost social activities that have a high impact on the activities of small businesses, contributing to the real economy and promoting well-being in society.

Originality/value

Previous studies mainly relied on mudarabah, mushakarah and zakat separately as they relate to the performance of Islamic banks. This study explores the impact of social finance which includes charity and zakat to examine their impact on Islamic banks’ stability. Further, the authors use institutional quality as a moderating variable in the relationship between Islamic social finance instruments and the stability of Islamic banks.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-06-2022-0441

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 50 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2024

Chengcheng Song and Echo Lei Wang

The paper examines the key driving factors behind the rapid and uneven growth of social enterprises in China based on Kerlin’s Macro-Institutional Social Enterprise (MISE) model…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper examines the key driving factors behind the rapid and uneven growth of social enterprises in China based on Kerlin’s Macro-Institutional Social Enterprise (MISE) model of social enterprise development, with an emphasis on testing key local institutional factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts the quantitative method approach. The hypotheses have been tested based on a cross-regional empirical analysis with two national datasets on China.

Findings

This study shows that among the state, market and civil society, local government support in terms of favorable policies is the sole determinant factor driving China’s social enterprise growth. On the other hand, the market is irrelevant and local civil society impedes social enterprise growth. This demonstrates that the current growth model is the result of government intervention.

Research limitations/implications

The datasets have a limited sample size. We suggest that future studies may collect a larger sample size with more comprehensive information. We think this study will encourage more comparative qualitative studies at the local level to reveal the underlying mechanisms of growth.

Practical implications

Since government policy is the determinant factor, the quality and quantity of government-backed incubation programs and platforms would matter the most for social enterprise growth. Our study also helps social entrepreneurs understand what factors matter when they try to develop social enterprises in China. They are advised to work on aspects of gaining legal legitimacy and political support in order to grow the sector.

Social implications

This conclusion suggests that professionals and practitioners should review the implications of the current growth of social enterprises in China, in terms of their sustainability, given their institutional isolation from other sectors.

Originality/value

Current studies have yet to thoroughly explore the role of meso- and micro-institutional factors in social enterprise development, especially in different contexts. With reference to Kerlin’s framework and the tri-sector model, this paper advances the understanding of social enterprise growth in China.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Rohit Bhardwaj, Saurabh Srivastava, Rashi Taggar and Sunali Bindra

Social enterprises (SEs) operate with a primary goal of meeting a social purpose while creating economic wealth for the fulfillment of their primary mission. These organizations…

Abstract

Purpose

Social enterprises (SEs) operate with a primary goal of meeting a social purpose while creating economic wealth for the fulfillment of their primary mission. These organizations need to develop a certain set of capabilities that facilitates the successful pursuit of their dual mission goals. This paper aims at exploring the micro-foundations of dynamic capabilities (DCs) that enable SEs to recognize and exploit opportunities and reconfigure their resources to pursue their dual-mission goals and adjust with the environmental dynamics.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a multiple case design and an abductive research approach to conduct an in-depth and in-due course investigation of the development of DCs in two distinct SEs selected on the basis of theoretical-purposive sampling and availability of the richness of the information about them.

Findings

This study finds certain generic and exclusive micro-foundations of DCs that contribute to sensing opportunities, seizing opportunities and reconfiguring resources in SEs. The exclusive micro-foundations of DCs of SEs noted in this study are sustainability of beneficiaries, involving beneficiaries in decision-making, defining unique business models and selective suppliers for critical resources.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study lies in its dependence on retrospective data, which may perhaps influence the comprehensiveness and accuracy of the acquired data. This study, although, implemented the measures to minimize the bias, by supplementing the interview data with archival sources.

Practical implications

To the researchers, this study proffers an in-depth and in-due course explanation of the micro-foundations of DCs that facilitate SEs to sense opportunities, seize opportunities and reconfigure their resources with time. To practitioners working in the area of social entrepreneurship, this process study is an outline of reference that answers the how and why concerning the importance of micro-foundations of DCs for SEs.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no prior study has explored the micro-foundations of DCs in the context of SEs from emerging economies. The exclusive micro-foundations of DCs for SEs found in this study are the unique and original contribution that outlines the path for future academic inquiry in this evolving research area.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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