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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Petranka Kelly, Jennifer Lawlor and Michael Mulvey

Purpose: The development of service automation continues to underpin the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors providing benefits for both customers and service…

Abstract

Purpose: The development of service automation continues to underpin the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors providing benefits for both customers and service companies. The purpose of this chapter is to showcase the practice of self-service technology (SST) usage in the contemporary tourism and hospitality sectors and present a conceptual framework of customer SST adoption.

Design/Methodology/Approach: This chapter offers an examination of theory, research and practice in relation to SST usage in tourism, highlighting the benefits and drawbacks arising for both customers and service providers. Since the benefits are achieved only if SSTs gain effective adoption with customers, this chapter focuses on concepts underpinning the study of customer SST adoption. Drawing on SST adoption factors and SST customer roles, a conceptual framework of SST adoption is discussed.

Findings/Practical Implications: This chapter examines the principles and practice underpinning the usage of self-service technologies in the travel, tourism and hospitality sectors, with specific reference to customer SST roles in co-creation. The customer SST roles provide a more detailed and nuanced picture of the customer perspective on SST usage. These nuanced roles are captured in a conceptual framework which seeks to further refine the understanding of customer SST adoption.

Research Implications & Originality/Value: The framework provides a useful foundation for further research with a focus on customer empowerment in SSTs. The future development of service automation will require a balance between the delivery of a personalised and smarter customer experience and technology applications that are unobtrusive and which do not pose any ethical or privacy concerns.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Ruomeng Wu, Meng Liu and Frank Kardes

This paper aims to investigate the effect of chronological age on the likelihood to choose a service provider with technological machines versus humans in the context of services.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of chronological age on the likelihood to choose a service provider with technological machines versus humans in the context of services.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experimental studies were used to collect data. In both experiments, scripts were devised to depict a food ordering situation. The studies, each of which represents two between-subject conditions, were presented to a total of 312 participants.

Findings

The results of studies show that as age increases, consumers show a higher visit likelihood with human servers as compared to self-ordering machines. This effect emerges because as age increases, people find it more comfortable and convenient to order from human servers. Nevertheless, when a self-ordering machine is the only option, older and younger people find it equally comfortable and convenient.

Research limitations/implications

This research indicates that as age increases, consumers tend to choose human servers. However, age does not impact willingness to use technology when human service is not available. A limitation of our research is that we look at food ordering contexts only. Another limitation is that most participants were between 18 and 60 years of age.

Practical implications

With a better understanding of the effect of age on preference for service types and the reason behind it, this research helps implement and manage service technologies that may elicit favorable judgments and decisions from consumers.

Originality/value

It demonstrates how, when and why age affects the intention to visit service providers that adopt self-service technologies. This research suggests that as age increases, consumers like human service better, but they do not resist self-service technology.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Jungkun Park, Dongyoup Kim and Hyowon Hyun

The purpose of this study is to investigate the evaluation of desirability/feasibility and adoption intention for the self-service technology of “older” consumers. This…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the evaluation of desirability/feasibility and adoption intention for the self-service technology of “older” consumers. This study also aims to show that the evaluation of desirability/feasibility and adoption intention varies depending on the type of customer value provided by self-service technology. Moreover, the authors improve the understanding of “older” consumers by comparing the adoption behavior through three proxies that express consumer aging: chronological age, subjective age and future time perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was performed as an experimental design by manipulating advertisement messages of self-service technology for online grocery shopping according to customer values. There are two analytic methods applied in this study. First, the current study compares the effects of chronological age, subjective age and the future time perspective on the evaluation and adoption intention of self-service technology by using structural equation modeling. Second, this study examines the moderation effect of customer values by conducting a multi-group analysis.

Findings

The results of current research indicate that the future time perspective explains participants’ evaluation and adoption intention of self-service technology compared to chronological age and subjective age. Specifically, participants who perceive their future time to be limited, rather than expansive, negatively assess the expected desirability and feasibility of self-service technology. In addition, the results of the moderation test show that the future time perspective affects more significantly the evaluation and adoption intention of self-service technology when the functional value is emphasized rather than emotional or social value.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study showed that the effect of future time perspective on expected desirability and feasibility was almost significant in each sub-dimension, but there were relatively few factors influencing trial intention. In this respect, it is necessary to look into the impact of the details of desirability and feasibility along with other variables known to influence the adoption of self-service technology related to aging. It would be meaningful to find and operationalize items that are valid for older consumers, rather than the desirability and feasibility elements typically applied to self-service technology.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the extension of the socioemotional selectivity theory that has been suggested to interpret older consumers’ behaviors. This research applies the concept of future time perspective to the assessment of desirability and feasibility and adoption intention. At the same time, for the marketing managers, the comparison between proxies that represent aging proposes the ways to attract “older” consumers with appropriate emphasis on customer values.

Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Joel E. Collier, Daniel L. Sherrell, Emin Babakus and Alisha Blakeney Horky

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential differences between types of self-service technology. Specifically, the paper explores how the dynamics of public and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the potential differences between types of self-service technology. Specifically, the paper explores how the dynamics of public and private self-service technology influence customers' decision to use the technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing customers of private and public self-service technology were surveyed from the same industry. Using structural equation modeling, the authors examine how relevant self-service constructs influence evaluations and attitudes of customers across both settings.

Findings

The analysis reveals that customers' control and convenience perceptions differ across public and private self-service technology. Additionally, customers placed a heavier emphasis on the hedonic or utilitarian evaluation of a service experience based on the type of self-service technology.

Practical implications

For managers of self-service applications, understanding the unique differences of public and private self-service technology can aid in the implementation and adoption of the technology. By properly understanding the differences of the self-service types, managers can provide a beneficial experience to the customer.

Originality/value

By identifying and describing two distinct categories of SSTs, this study allows managers and researchers to better understand how and why individuals choose to utilize individual self-service technologies. Through understanding the unique dynamics of a public and a private SST experience, retailers can determine the appropriate strategy for customer adoption based on the utilitarian or hedonic functions of the technology.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Line Ricard, Lise Préfontaine and Maria Sioufi

New information and communication technologies are constantly emerging, altering business methods, and particularly, the relationship an organization establishes with its…

2863

Abstract

New information and communication technologies are constantly emerging, altering business methods, and particularly, the relationship an organization establishes with its customers. Therefore, it is essential to analyse the impact of these technologies on customer behaviour. The purpose of this study is to explore, in the banking sector, the impact of customers’ use of self‐service technologies on their interest in a relationship approach, and consequently in a long‐term personalized relationship. A survey of 242 adult students reveals that there is no real impact of the use of self‐service technologies on interest in a relationship approach. Respondents who use these technologies extensively do not place more or less importance on their relationship with a given bank.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Multi-Stakeholder Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-898-2

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

L. Michelle Bobbitt and Pratibha A. Dabholkar

Technology‐based self‐service is growing at a tremendous rate all over the world, but a strong unifying theory to understand this form of service is lacking. Proposes a…

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Abstract

Technology‐based self‐service is growing at a tremendous rate all over the world, but a strong unifying theory to understand this form of service is lacking. Proposes a comprehensive conceptual framework that incorporates several well‐known attitudinal theories to explain the pivotal role of attitudes in influencing intentions and behavior related to technology‐based self‐service. The framework makes it possible to understand and predict better consumer decisions related to using technology‐based self‐service by thoroughly examining underlying consumer attitudes. Uses the Internet to illustrate how our framework can be applied to study consumer behavior related to a specific technology‐based self‐service. Draws on insights from the extant literature on technology‐based self‐service and also incorporates the many unique characteristics of the Internet that have implications for theory. Discusses practical implications of our model for marketers and provides directions for future research on technology‐based self‐service in general and the Internet in particular. With its integrative approach to theory, also contributes to the attitudinal literature.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Dwane H. Dean

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of shopper age on attitudes toward and use of retail self‐service technology (SST). The age variable has received…

7457

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of shopper age on attitudes toward and use of retail self‐service technology (SST). The age variable has received relatively little attention in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaire responses from three age groups are compared. Also, cluster analysis is used to group subjects based on similarity in attitudes toward and use of SST.

Findings

Compared to younger consumers, older consumers had experience with fewer types of SSTs, less confidence in using SST, reported missing human interaction to a greater degree, used self‐checkout less often when the option was available, were less willing to pay a premium for express checkout, and were more likely to attribute a corporate self‐interest for the introduction of SST. For the total sample of 718 subjects, 40 percent reported using store self‐checkout 15 percent of the time or less when the option was available. Only 25 percent of subjects reported using automated store checkout on more than half of their shopping occasions.

Research limitations/implications

Only eight types of SST were studied and only one technology was investigated in depth.

Practical implications

Based on the findings of this study, four managerial actions are recommended that may potentially increase traffic throughput at automated retail checkout.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the first study to find significant differences among age groups on multiple dependent variables associated with SST. Also, the identification of consumer clusters based on attitudes toward and use of SST may be novel.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 October 2022

Lovemore Chikazhe, Thomas Bhebhe, Brighton Nyagadza, Edmore Munyanyi and Tricia Singizi

This paper aims to investigate how graduates’ perceptions of self-service technology and perceived job performance can be used to assess university service quality. Also…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how graduates’ perceptions of self-service technology and perceived job performance can be used to assess university service quality. Also, this study examines the mediating role of perceived job performance on the effect of university service quality on graduates’ satisfaction and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative methodology was adopted where university graduates’ perceptions of self-service technology and job performance were used to assess the level of the university’s service quality. Through a cross-sectional survey, data were collected from 280 university graduates employed in Chinhoyi town, Zimbabwe, during the period between August and December 2021.

Findings

This study’s findings indicate that self-service technology influences university service quality which in turn impacts on graduates’ perceived job performance, satisfaction and loyalty. Graduates' perceived job performance was also found to partially mediate the effect of university service quality on satisfaction and loyalty among graduates.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s results are instrumental to enable university’s management in developing economies to adopt and improve self-service technologies as this enhances university service quality and graduates’ perceived job performance, satisfaction and loyalty.

Originality/value

This paper provides new insights, that is, the incorporation of graduates’ perceptions of self-service technology and job performance in assessing the university’s service quality. This research further clarifies the function of graduates’ perceived job performance in mediating the effect of university service quality on graduate satisfaction and loyalty. This study further adds to our understanding of tools, criteria and methods for assuring university service quality.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Arun Kumar Kaushik and Zillur Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the various antecedent beliefs predicting customers’ attitudes toward, and adoption of, self-service technologies (SSTs) available…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the various antecedent beliefs predicting customers’ attitudes toward, and adoption of, self-service technologies (SSTs) available in the banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive research design with survey approach is used to develop and test a conceptual model of adoption for all three self-service banking technologies (SSBTs).

Findings

The results of the comparative analysis showed that antecedent beliefs affecting adopters’ attitude vary across different SSBTs. It extends and tests the technology acceptance model (TAM) by including two additional antecedents from the theories of adoption behavior.

Research limitations/implications

All three SSBTs included in the paper are from the banking industry, which limits the generalizability of the findings to other industries. Many other limitations were also reported.

Practical implications

The findings reveal why and how customers decide to adopt different SSBTs and why a few SSBTs are more widely accepted than others. The practicality of the findings guides managers and designers of technological interfaces.

Social implications

People will also benefit from the effective implementation of SSTs.

Originality/value

This study stands out as one of the early studies to empirically examine the antecedents-attitude-intention relationship across different SSBTs available in Indian banking industry.

Retraction notice

The International Journal of Bank Marketing wishes to retract the article Kaushik, A.K. and Rahman, Z. (2015), “Innovation adoption across self-service banking technologies in India”, published in International Journal of Bank Marketing, Vol. 33, No. 2, pp. 96-121.

It has come to our attention that the article contains substantial similarities to the following article: Curran, J.M. and Meuter, M.L. (2005), “Self-service technology adoption: comparing three technologies”, Journal of Services Marketing, Vol. 19 No. 2, pp. 103-113, https://doi.org/10.1108/08876040510591411.

The authors have fully cooperated with this investigation and supplied the original dataset for review. Using this dataset, the editorial team were unable to replicate the results included in the article, and as a result, the decision has been made to retract the article.

The International Journal of Bank Marketing author guidelines make it clear that articles must be original and must not infringe any existing copyright.

The journal apologises to both Professor Curran and Professor Meuter, and its readers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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