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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Xavier Bartoll and Raul Ramos

This study aims to analyse the potential confounding and moderator role of job satisfaction on the effect of working hours on self-perceived health and to analyse the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse the potential confounding and moderator role of job satisfaction on the effect of working hours on self-perceived health and to analyse the effect of transitions between working hours and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Using longitudinal data for the Catalan economy in 2005–2009, first, it runs a linear probability random effects model, with self-perceived health as the dependent variable, on one-year lagged job satisfaction, working hours and its interaction. Second, it estimated an ordered logit model to test the effect of transitions to working hours and different levels of job satisfaction on self-perceived health.

Findings

Short working hours ≤ 20 h/w predict good self-perceived health for women. Long working hours 41–47 h/w predict poor self-perceived health among men and women but not for very long hours ≥ 48 h/w. Interaction effects between working 41–47 h/w and job satisfaction levels were found for men and women. Improvements in job satisfaction for health are reduced when working long hours. For employees, a decrease in job satisfaction may suggest a health risk except if hours also reduce.

Social implications

Workplace practices aimed at gaining flexibility in working hours may be offset, in terms of health outcomes, by lower job satisfaction. Flexible working hours from the employees' side should be favoured to face reductions in job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The novelty of this paper is that highlights differential effect of job satisfaction in the relation between working hours and health status.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Nunzia Nappo and Damiano Fiorillo

The paper studies the simultaneous effect of formal and informal volunteering on self-perceived individual health across nine European countries while controlling, among…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper studies the simultaneous effect of formal and informal volunteering on self-perceived individual health across nine European countries while controlling, among other things, for socioeconomic characteristics and social and cultural participation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs the 2006 wave of the EU-SILC dataset for estimating recursive trivariate probit models using instrumental variables.

Findings

The paper finds that although formal volunteering and informal volunteering are correlated with each other, they have different impacts on health. Formal volunteering is never correlated with higher self-perceived individual health except in the Netherlands. In contrast, informal volunteering is related to lower self-perceived individual health in Austria, Finland, France, the Netherlands, Spain, and Italy.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation concerns the absence of other measures of volunteering, such as volunteering hours that are not available in the employed dataset. The second limitation is that the dataset collection on social and cultural variables in EU-SILC is cross-sectional while the optimal dataset should be a panel data. The third limitation is that instrumental variables are observed in the same year of declaring self-perceived individual health while the optimal timing would be at least one year before.

Practical implications

Findings of the paper show that formal volunteering has no effect on self-perceived individual health while informal volunteering has negative consequences.

Social implications

Volunteering is performed because of an individual decision and could be considered a consequence of how social responsibilities are distributed within countries. Our results show that informal volunteering has a negative effect on health; this is likely to depend on how people manage stress coming from performing this altruistic activity. It is likely that a more cautious distribution of social responsibilities could prevent the negative effects of informal volunteering on health.

Originality/value

The originality of the present paper is in simultaneously examining the impact of formal and informal volunteering on self-perceived individual health. Furthermore, most of the existing studies on formal volunteering and health focus on a single country; this paper compares nine European countries characterized by different social, cultural, economic, and institutional features. Finally, the paper addresses the issue of reverse causation.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-11-2017-0548

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Pilar Serrano‐Gallardo, José Díaz‐Olalla, Ángel Otero and Francisco Bolumar

This paper describes the level of self‐perceived health (SPH) in immigrant and native populations resident in Madrid and the demographic and socioeconomic factors…

Abstract

This paper describes the level of self‐perceived health (SPH) in immigrant and native populations resident in Madrid and the demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with negative self‐perceived health status, from a gender perspective. A population‐based home survey (2005 Madrid Health Survey) was carried out. Subjects were selected by random sampling of bistage clusters. The study was limited to 5704 adults (16 to 64 years). SPH was considered the dependent variable. The independent variables included migration status, social class, age, sex, marital status, level of education, area of residence, work precariousness, family burden and perception of environmental quality. The association was assessed by odds ratios and their 95% confidence intervals obtained by multivariate logistic regression models disaggregated by gender and migration status. Results showed that poor/fair health status was perceived more by natives and by women. The variables associated with fair/poor SPH in immigrant men were the influence of working conditions perceived as negative and perception of the quality of the environment as poor, and in immigrant women, older age, low educational level and the influence of working conditions perceived as negative. Gender inequalities in self‐perceived health exist, and different factors are associated with immigrant and native populations. The results of the study support the need for a health intervention that would diminish gender inequalities in health, which are more accentuated in immigrants.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Hung-Chou Lin, Li-Chin Shih and Hung-Ming Lin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underlying mechanisms of how consumers respond to health-claim framing via experimental design.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the underlying mechanisms of how consumers respond to health-claim framing via experimental design.

Design/methodology/approach

Across the two experiments conducted for this research, the authors examine the moderating effects of self-perceived health status and individuals’ need for cognition on health-claim framing.

Findings

The results indicate that personal differences moderate the effects of health-claim framing on consumers’ food-product evaluation. Consumers with poor health status evaluate food product more favorably when the reduced-disease-risk claims are offered. However, consumers with good health status evaluate food product similarly between the two health claims. Moreover, consumers with a high need for cognition evaluate food product more favorably when the reduced-disease-risk claims are used, whereas consumers with a low need for cognition evaluate food product more favorably when the enhance function claims are used.

Practical implications

This research provides that reduced-disease-risk claims may be the better communication message used to persuade consumers no matter they rate themselves as poor health status or good health status. Moreover, the results of the present research also indicate the importance of market segmentation. Marketers could design proper advertisements and select the appropriate media vehicles for low need for cognition readers and high need for cognition readers separately.

Originality/value

There has been few studies addressed consumers’ product choice with respect to different health-claim framing. Further, this research presents a new concept of the effects between individual differences and health-claim framing on consumers’ food-product evaluation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Filip Chybalski

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether cross-country differences in pensionable age explain such differences in economic activity of people at near-retirement age.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether cross-country differences in pensionable age explain such differences in economic activity of people at near-retirement age.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study uses regression models for macro-panel encompassing 21 European countries in the period 2008–2014.

Findings

Empirical results indicate that pensionable age is a determinant of cross-country differences in employment rate in the near-retirement age group, and less a factor differentiating average effective retirement age. It turns out that other factors matter, including salaries and wages as percentage of GDP (treated as a proxy for the occupational composition of populations across the countries studied), self-employment, participation in education and training, or self-perceived health.

Social implications

The problem of economic activity at the near-retirement age is complex and cannot be limited to legal regulations concerning pensionable age. The policy aiming at stimulating the economic activity of the near-elderly should include actions on many sides including labour market, pension system, education, training, or health care.

Originality/value

The results complement studies based on the single-country approach and demonstrate that pensionable age does not account for cross-country differences in terms of average effective age of retirement when controlling for other factors. Moreover, factors differentiating effective retirement age and employments rates across countries studied are not similar.

Details

Journal of Economics, Finance and Administrative Science, vol. 26 no. 51
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2077-1886

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Pilar Ester Arroyo, Javier Liñan and Jorge Vera Martínez

When selecting manufactured foods, customers consider several product features. Given the contemporary trends of food consumption, the purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

When selecting manufactured foods, customers consider several product features. Given the contemporary trends of food consumption, the purpose of this paper is to determine the influence that some demographic and psychographic key variables have on the chances of a consumer belonging to a market segment characterised by health-related food preferences.

Design/methodology/approach

The food choice scale is revised to develop a multidimensional measure of the factors underlying consumer food choices. Data of 288 sampled consumers were used to validate the scale and to group consumers into four segments based on the value assigned to several food-product meta-attributes. Depending on these food choice values, the study identified four dissimilar clusters: utilitarian, protecting, toning and highly demanding.

Findings

Consumers use multiple attributes when choosing food products. However, emerging segments tend to prefer health-related attributes over utilitarian or conventional attributes, such as price, flavour or accessibility. The consumers of these segments tend to be older, more health conscious and more prone to psychological health risks.

Originality/value

Demographic and psychographic traits tend to drive trade-offs between health- and non-health-related attributes when considering food products. Several multivariate methodologies were innovatively coupled to characterize consumers based on their healthy food preferences and individual traits.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Sophie Hennekam, Sarah Richard and François Grima

This exploratory qualitative study examines both the impact of mental health conditions on self-perceived job performance and how individuals with mental health conditions…

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Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory qualitative study examines both the impact of mental health conditions on self-perceived job performance and how individuals with mental health conditions cope with their conditions at work.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 257 responses to a qualitative questionnaire and 17 in-depth interviews with individuals with mental health conditions are analyzed.

Findings

The findings show that mental health conditions can negatively impact self-perceived job performance in the form of lower quality of one's work, slower pace, and more mistakes. In addition, the findings reveal coping strategies that positively and negatively affect one’s performance at work. Strategies that negatively influence one’s performance include substance abuse and self-harm, suppressing and hiding one's symptoms, and forcing oneself to continue to work when feeling unwell. Coping strategies that tend to positively affect their performance include accepting one's condition and taking time off, medication and counseling, mindfulness activities, transparent communication, humor, and a compensation strategy.

Originality/value

A growing number of individuals struggle with mental health conditions at work, impacting both organizations and employees. However, little is known about the influence of mental health conditions on one's performance at work, how individuals cope with their mental health conditions at work, and what effect those coping strategies have on organization-relevant outcomes.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Rocco Palumbo, Carmela Annarumma, Paola Adinolfi and Marco Musella

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the changing patterns of users’ behavior in the health care service system. Although patient engagement and health services…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the changing patterns of users’ behavior in the health care service system. Although patient engagement and health services’ co-production are understood as essential ingredients in the recipe for sustainable health systems, some determinants to patient involvement are still widely neglected by both policy makers and health care professionals. Among others, inadequate health literacy performs as a significant barrier to patient empowerment.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey aimed at objectively measuring health literacy-related skills was administered to a random sample of 600 Italian patients. The Italian version of the Newest Vital Sign (NVS) was used to assess the ability of the respondents to deal with written health information. Moreover, the respondents were asked to self-report their ability to navigate the health system. It was presumed that inadequate health literacy as measured by the NVS is related with impaired self-reported functional, interactive, and critical health-related competencies, paving the way for the inability and the unwillingness of patients to be involved in the health care provision.

Findings

About half of the sample showed inadequate health literacy. However, poor NVS scores were only slightly associated with limited self-reported functional, interactive, and critical health-related competencies. In general, patients with inadequate health-related skills were not likely to be engaged in the provision of health services. Elderly, people suffering from financial deprivation and less educated individuals were found to be at special risk of living with limited health literacy.

Practical implications

Limited health literacy is a common and relevant issue among people dealing with the health care service system. The impaired ability to collect, process, and use health information produces barriers to patient engagement and prevents the evolution of patients’ behavior toward health care co-production.

Originality/value

Health literacy is a widely overlooked issue in the Italian national health system. This paper contributes in shedding light on the determinants and effects of health literacy of Italian hospital patients. Besides, some insights on the validity of the methodological tools typically used to assess health-related skills are provided.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Jacques Wels

There is an emerging literature focusing on the impact of late career transitions on health, but little is known so far about the role working time modulations might play…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an emerging literature focusing on the impact of late career transitions on health, but little is known so far about the role working time modulations might play in explaining older workers’ health. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) Waves 4–7, the paper assesses the association between the different types of change in working time, the total weekly working hours at baseline and the level of income and the change in Self-perceived health (SPH). The model controls for financial wealth, qualification, gender, age, the sector of activity and self-reported health at baseline.

Findings

Respondents who retire have a better SPH compared with those who keep working at constant working time. Those who work long hours benefit more from retiring. Respondents working long hours before being unemployed tend to be less affected by a negative change in SPH. Those who reduce working time by 50 per cent or more and work long hours at baseline have lower probabilities to be affected by a negative change in SPH compared with those who work fewer hours. Finally, low-paid workers are those who benefit the most from retiring or reducing working time.

Social implications

Results point out the need to foster working time arrangements for low-paid workers to prevent adverse health impacts.

Originality/value

There is a significant association between change in working time and change in self-reported health that has not been examined by previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Sophie Hennekam

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the baby boomer generation and the veteran generation in the Netherlands perceive their own employability and how this is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the baby boomer generation and the veteran generation in the Netherlands perceive their own employability and how this is related to their self-reported job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 973 workers in employment aged 45 and over filled out a survey measuring self-perceived employability and self-reported job performance. Data were analyzed by the use of t-tests and multiple regression.

Findings

Based on the human capital theory, it was found that self-perceived employability was positively related to self-reported job performance. However, in contradiction with our expectations, the veterans perceived their internal and external employability as more positive than the baby boomers.

Originality/value

This study distinguishes between two generations that are part of the group “older workers”. Moreover, we show that a positive relationship exists between one’s perception of one’s own employability and their self-reported performance.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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