Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Kaija Marjukka Collin, Sara Keronen, Soila Lemmetty, Tommi Auvinen and Elina Riivari

The purpose of this study is to identify the challenges of low hierarchy and self-organised structures for employees’ learning and competency development at work. In the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the challenges of low hierarchy and self-organised structures for employees’ learning and competency development at work. In the past decade, interest in employees’ and organisations’ self-directedness has increased. Self-organised structures are perceived as better able to answer to the quickly changing requirements of clients and business environments. Within these structures, employees are expected to take on more responsibility and maintain more control over their workplace learning, which means they must be self-directed and autonomous. An important question for this approach is how can workplace learning and employee competence development be enhanced.

Design/methodology/approach

Two self-organised Finnish information and communication technology-companies participated in the study. With the help of data-driven content analysis, 36 interviews were analysed.

Findings

Unclear roles, structures and areas of responsibility caused challenges during the guidance and support of learning, for long-term and sustainable professional development possibilities and in organising and prioritizing work tasks related to learning.

Practical implications

In self-organised structures, there should be a means of the better supporting individual- and team-based learning. This will allow learning to have as much value as possible in the future and, therefore, be more sustainable. The findings are also important to be taken into account in managers’ and HR professionals’ education and training.

Originality/value

The findings of this study can offer insights into employees’ well-being emerging from the possibility to learn and be supported in that learning especially in self-organised structures, which so far has been scarcely studied.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Mandy Singer-Brodowski

This paper’s purpose is to describe students’ learning processes in a project-based and self-organized seminar on sustainability. A detailed knowledge of typical learning

Abstract

Purpose

This paper’s purpose is to describe students’ learning processes in a project-based and self-organized seminar on sustainability. A detailed knowledge of typical learning processes is part of a pedagogical content knowledge of sustainability and can therefore contribute to the professional development of university educators.

Design/methodology/approach

In a project-based and self-organized seminar, a case study has been conducted with the grounded theory’s methodological approach. Data were collected from student interviews, group discussions and observations of students’ planning and organization meetings.

Findings

The results of the case study show that students’ learning processes vary depending on their pre-seminar sustainability experiences. Two types have been established: sustainability newcomers and sustainability experts. Furthermore, the results indicate the importance of emotions in the involvement with sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The significance of the case study is limited by a small number of cases. Also, the results are specific for a seminar self-organized by the students and can therefore not simply be transferred to other seminars.

Practical implications

Knowledge of specific learning processes and a possible conceptual change in sustainability classes could be an important issue in the professional development of university educators because it would increase the educators’ pedagogical content knowledge.

Originality/value

The triangulation of qualitative data mainly served the investigation of students’ perspectives and therefore the understanding of subjective preferences, experiences and learning processes in the field of higher education for sustainable development (HESD).

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Laurie Thomas and Sheila Harri‐Augstein

This paper questions the validity of traditional scientific method for the study of human learning and proposes five postulates for the advancement of a conversational…

Abstract

This paper questions the validity of traditional scientific method for the study of human learning and proposes five postulates for the advancement of a conversational science. It considers how an evolving capacity for lifelong learning has been constrained by inappropriate research methods and educational practice leading to a learning deficit in the population. Over 25 years of action research offers solid evidence for the humanisation of science as a conversational research process which respects the individual as a unique meaning constructing, self‐organising learning (SOL) entity. A learning conversation pedagogy which enables learners to act as personal scientists and action researchers and a SOL Systems Seven for a community of action researchers is outlined. Finally, the paper considers how SOL entities can function as catalysts for new forms of ORDER with a potential for the emergence of a new species of learning and of being human.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Petro Poutanen, Olli Parviainen and Leif Åberg

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conditions that give rise to and support self‐organizing learning and creativity in blended learning environments. Particular

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conditions that give rise to and support self‐organizing learning and creativity in blended learning environments. Particular attention is given to theoretical and practical suggestions and the roles of on‐ and offline working environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Iterative grounded theory methodology is used to provide a case analysis of a course held at the University of Helsinki in 2010 in conjunction with theoretical discussions.

Findings

Practical advice is provided for organizers of blended learning courses and a theoretical model for self‐organizing in blended learning settings is proposed. Three key considerations of self‐organizing – space, knowledge, and agency –were located and each of them is discussed with a focus on practical recommendations.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed, especially in a “classroom” context, in order to further clarify the links of different on‐ and offline learning environments and to reach a better understanding of the interplay between them.

Practical implications

The approach presented here can be useful for implementing web‐based blended learning methods in universities and other educational organizations.

Originality/value

Technology‐ and teacher‐oriented views of learning are not successful in the context of blended learning. Conditions for self‐organizing and creativity are needed.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Bill Richardson

Describes a range of contexts associated with the learningorganization literature and the job of learning organization leader.Offers prescriptions about how classically…

Abstract

Describes a range of contexts associated with the learning organization literature and the job of learning organization leader. Offers prescriptions about how classically administered productivity improvement might be implemented in organizations, on the one hand, and how self‐organizing, learning networks might be facilitated, on the other. Also examines the problems and leadership challenges associated with organizationally destructive learning communities.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

THE VALUE OF ABSTRACTS AND THEIR USE ‐ MCB is not a company to rest on its laurels. In the vernacular of modern‐day management literature, the company can rightly claim to…

Abstract

THE VALUE OF ABSTRACTS AND THEIR USE ‐ MCB is not a company to rest on its laurels. In the vernacular of modern‐day management literature, the company can rightly claim to be a learning organization; one that seeks to regenerate and develop itself in accordance with current trends, most notably those in customer and market requirements.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

David Smith and Sheila Vaughan

This is not yet another article outlining our experiences as outdoor management development facilitators. It is a serious attempt to describe how we have used the outdoors…

Abstract

This is not yet another article outlining our experiences as outdoor management development facilitators. It is a serious attempt to describe how we have used the outdoors as a platform for encouraging groups of managers and trainers to review the whole process of learning how to bring about change in their organizations. Takes the ideas of Deming and Senge very much to heart and expounds the theories of self‐directed and enterprise‐led learning as the vehicles for change. Through the outdoor activities, refers to the obvious benefits of the customer‐supplier, rather than the command and control ways of working; the importance of sharing “mental models” becomes obvious as does the benefits of contributions from all members and not just the favoured few. Further, claims that competition can be counter‐productive to achieving a “quality” outcome. Explains that skills which participants begin to acquire during this time, particularly the skill of “learning to learn” are put to work back in the training room as strategic and purposeful action plans are drawn up ready for implementation back in the workplace.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Qingquan Meng, Jiyou Jia and Zhiyong Zhang

The purpose of this study is to verify the effect of smart pedagogy to facilitate the high order thinking skills of students and to provide the design suggestion of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to verify the effect of smart pedagogy to facilitate the high order thinking skills of students and to provide the design suggestion of curriculum and intelligent tutoring systems in smart education.

Design/methodology/approach

A smart pedagogy framework was designed. The quasi-experiment was conducted in a junior high school. The experimental class used the smart pedagogy and smart learning environment. The control class adopted conventional teaching strategies. The math test scores of these two classes were compared to verify the effectiveness of smart pedagogy.

Findings

The smart pedagogy framework contains three sections including the situated learning (S), mastery learning (M), adaptive learning (A), reflective learning (R) and thinking tools (T) (SMART) key elements model, the curriculum design method and detailed teaching strategy. The SMART key elements model integrates the situated learning, mastery learning, adaptive learning, reflective learning and thinking tools to facilitate the high order thinking. The curriculum design method of smart pedagogy combines the first five principles of instruction and the SMART key elements model to design the curriculum. The detailed teaching strategies of smart pedagogy contain kinds of innovative learning methods. The results of the quasi-experiment proved that the learning outcome was significantly promoted by using smart pedagogy.

Originality/value

This research investigates a general framework that can be used to cultivate the high order thinking skills in different subjects and grades was one of the first to introduce high order thinking skills into smart education. The framework of smart pedagogy was innovative and effect in practice.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 November 2014

Ann Morrison and Hendrik Knoche

The purpose of this paper is to synchronize two courses to focus on the students working with learning and applying tools in the one course and acting on understandings…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to synchronize two courses to focus on the students working with learning and applying tools in the one course and acting on understandings gained to produce artefacts in the other.

Design/methodology/approach

Working with real users throughout all stages of the design process, the authors structured two courses so findings from the evaluation methods learnt in the one course (their analyses) were directly acted on in the other (their re-designs). The authors fostered a group-spirited learning environment where students presented designs-in-process; explained the findings from focused evaluation methods using tangible representations; identified the relationship from these findings for subsequent re-design rationales; and discussed and critiqued each other's work using multiple feedback, teach-back and discursive strategies.

Findings

The authors found that in-depth coverage of material, working with real data and users at all stages of assessment and producing visualizations from evaluations, naturally forced student motivation to act and redesign better solutions. The authors noted improved attendance and students reported high engagement and content appreciation.

Research limitations/implications

Ensuring relevance, by adding larger context concerns, expansive critical methods and feedback processes in a cycle of understanding, acting, learning can have useful practical and social implications. This is germane when designing for quality of everyday use in, for example, education, urban environments and mobile applications.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the development of learning environments where course and semester content is developed in tandem to support integrated learning by acting with project output and teach back “presentations” throughout the course.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a unifying tandem approach to learning and applying evaluation tools with real users, teachback and acting to improve redesigns with potential to improve human computer interaction educational standards for learning and design outcomes.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 43 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Roger Bennett

Identifies ten key issues in “people development” andshows how these are addressed by three real companies. Describes twolearner‐centred approaches to development.

Abstract

Identifies ten key issues in “people development” and shows how these are addressed by three real companies. Describes two learner‐centred approaches to development.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000