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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Yalan Yan, Xi Zhang, Xianjin Zha, Tingting Jiang, Ling Qin and Zhiyuan Li

Digital libraries and social media are two sources of online information with different characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate self-efficacy into the…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital libraries and social media are two sources of online information with different characteristics. The purpose of this paper is to integrate self-efficacy into the analysis of the relationship between information sources and decision making, and to explore the effect of self-efficacy on decision making, as well as the interacting effect of self-efficacy and information sources on decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected and the partial least squares structural equation modeling was employed to verify the research model.

Findings

The effect of digital library usage for acquiring information on perceived decision quality (PDQ) is larger than that of social media usage for acquiring information on PDQ. Self-efficacy in acquiring information (SEAI) stands out as the key determinant for PDQ. The effect of social media usage for acquiring information on PDQ is positively moderated by SEAI.

Practical implications

Decision making is a fundamental activity for individuals, but human decision making is often subject to biases. The findings of this study provide useful insights into decision quality improvement, highlighting the importance of SEAI in the face of information overload.

Originality/value

This study integrates self-efficacy into the analysis of the relationship between information sources and decision making, presenting a new perspective for decision-making research and practice alike.

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2019

Xianjin Zha, Haijuan Yang, Yalan Yan, Guanxiang Yan, Chengsong Huang and Kunfeng Liu

Microblogging as one kind of social media application provides an important information sharing platform. Adaptive information sharing is the combination of adaptive…

Abstract

Purpose

Microblogging as one kind of social media application provides an important information sharing platform. Adaptive information sharing is the combination of adaptive information technologies (IT) use behavior and information sharing behavior and subsequently refers to adaptive use of IT oriented to information sharing. The purpose of this paper is to understand adaptive information sharing in the context of microblogging from the perspective of cognitive switching.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was developed and survey data were collected. The partial least squares structural equation modeling was employed to verify the research model.

Findings

Adaptive information sharing is positively impacted by other people’s use, discrepancies and deliberate initiatives among which other people’s use is the key determinant. Meanwhile, task self-efficacy positively moderates the effect of other people’s use on adaptive information sharing.

Practical implications

Developers of microblogging should as far as possible create learning atmosphere and learning culture. With learning atmosphere and culture, more and more users could keep on learning from observing other people. Consequently, more and more users would be willing to try new features of microblogging to share information.

Originality/value

This study examines adaptive information sharing by extending adaptive IT use behavior from the levels of technology, system and feature to the information level, presenting a new lens for adaptive IT use and information sharing alike.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 71 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Yu-Yin Wang, Tung-Ching Lin and Crystal Han-Huei Tsay

Though prior research has recognized business skills as one of the keys to successful information system development, few studies have investigated the determinants of an…

Abstract

Purpose

Though prior research has recognized business skills as one of the keys to successful information system development, few studies have investigated the determinants of an IS developer’s behavioral intention to learn such skills. Based on the motivation-ability-role perception-situational factors (i.e. the MARS model), the purpose of this paper is to argue that the intention of IS developers to acquire business skills is influenced by learning motivation (M), learning self-efficacy (A), change agent role perception (R), and situational support (S).

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 254 IS developers are analyzed using the partial least squares technique.

Findings

Results show that a developer’s intention to learn business skills is positively influenced by intrinsic learning motivation and both absolute and relative learning self-efficacy. Furthermore, in comparison to two other change agent roles, the advocate role leads to a significantly higher level of learning intention. Finally, work and non-work support positively influence both extrinsic and intrinsic learning motivation. Notably, non-work support has a greater impact on both absolute and relative learning self-efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

Though many of the proposed hypotheses were supported, results showed several interesting and unexpected findings. First, regarding the change agent role perception, people who perceived themselves as advocates displayed a higher level of intention to learn business skills than did those who identified with the other two roles (i.e. traditionalist and facilitator). Second, when compared to extrinsic learning motivation, intrinsic learning motivation contributed more to the intention to learn business skills. Third, the study contributes to the literature by finding that, in terms of direction and magnitude, the two types of self-efficacy have similar influence on an IS developer’s behavioral intention to learn business skills. Finally, work support was found to have a positive impact on both extrinsic and intrinsic learning motivation. However, it was interesting to note that work support did not lead to significantly higher levels of relative and absolute learning self-efficacy.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide several critical implications for practitioners seeking to encourage IS developers to learn b-skills. First, organizations should strongly encourage IS developers to take on the advocate role in ISD projects, and urge them to acquire business skills through formal education and on-the-job training. Second, organizations should also help IS developers understand how learning business skills is important for their future work and potential self-growth, rather than focusing solely on extrinsic benefits such as promotion or remuneration. Third, organizations can also make use of the strategies to enhance IS developer’s learning self-confidence and beliefs, which will, in turn, increase their intention to learn business skills. Finally, support from others is influential in the formulation of positive work attitudes and behaviors, so organizations will benefit when employees are well supported.

Originality/value

While prior research has emphasized the importance of business skill possession for IS developers during the system development process, few studies have explored the factors affecting an IS developer’s behavioral intention to learn those business skills. This study intends to bridge this gap by investigating factors that drive IS developers’ intention to learn business skills. The findings of this study are useful to researchers in the development and testing theories related to IS developer learning behavior, and to practitioners to facilitate business skill learning for their IS development staff.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Adefunke Sarah Ebijuwa and Iyabo Mabawonku

Undergraduates use electronic library resources for academic activities. However, literature has revealed that undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources is low in

Abstract

Purpose

Undergraduates use electronic library resources for academic activities. However, literature has revealed that undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources is low in Nigeria owing to attitude, computer literacy and information retrieval skills, while little attention was given to computer self-efficacy. This paper aims to examine computer self-efficacy as a predictor of undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources in federal universities in south-west Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive survey research design was adopted. Multi-stage sampling method was used to select 1,526 undergraduates from the population size of 30,516 from six federal universities in south-west Nigeria in four faculties (Arts, Engineering/ Technology, Science and Social sciences) and three departments from each of the faculties (English, History and Philosophy; Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering: Economics, Sociology and Psychology). Data were collected using a questionnaire and were analysed using descriptive statistics, mean and standard deviation, Pearson’s Product Moment Correlation, hierarchical and regression analyses at 0.05 level of significance.

Findings

There was a significant relationship between computer self-efficacy and use of electronic library resources (r = 0.13, p < 0.05). The result of the analysis showed that computer self-efficacy influenced undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources in federal universities in south-west Nigeria.

Research limitations/implications

The data for the research were obtained from undergraduates in the selected faculties in the six federal universities except for two faculties which did not have some departments that were common to the selected faculties.

Practical implications

The findings indicated that computer self-efficacy improves the use of electronic library resources for academic purposes. It therefore encourages the library management to provide the necessary support and training for the undergraduates to acquire the technical skills required for the acquisition of computer self-efficacy. This has greater influence on undergraduates’ ability to use the computer maximally to access electronic library resources for academic purposes.

Social implications

It will improve the undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources for academic purposes. This implies that the undergraduates will have access to information around the world that could be useful for development in and around their locality which will become easily accessible. Also, in this era of computer, it will encourage reading culture among undergraduates. This could inform policymakers on the need to provide more electronic library resources for libraries.

Originality/value

The study provides original data on computer self-efficacy as a predictor of undergraduates’ use of electronic library resources in federal universities in south-west Nigeria. This can provide valuable indicator for library managements considering enhanced utilisation of electronic library resources.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 68 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

S. Serap Kurbanoglu

This paper is primarily concerned with self‐efficacy in the context of information literacy. The focus is first on the concept of self‐efficacy, followed by attainment of…

Abstract

This paper is primarily concerned with self‐efficacy in the context of information literacy. The focus is first on the concept of self‐efficacy, followed by attainment of self‐efficacy beliefs. Finally, findings of the research, the aim of which was to explore students’ (who enrolled in the Department of Information Management, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey) perceived self‐efficacy for information and computer literacy, are scrutinized. Results of the research indicate no significant year‐to‐year changes, although the students have a positive perceived self‐efficacy for information literacy. Students’ self‐efficacy beliefs regarding information literacy and computers are correlated.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 59 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Ramsha Zakariya and Sajid Bashir

Knowledge sharing is believed to enhance creativity; however, the purpose of this study is to find out how and when knowledge hiding perception of target affects…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge sharing is believed to enhance creativity; however, the purpose of this study is to find out how and when knowledge hiding perception of target affects creativity of IT professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a temporally segregated survey based data from IT professionals, this study investigates a three-way interplay of knowledge hiding, supervisor support for creativity and creative self-efficacy to examine employee’s creativity. Time lagged data were collected from 253 respondents working in IT-based organizations across Pakistan.

Findings

Findings provide interesting insights revealing that knowledge hiding perception of target enhances target’s creativity through the mechanism of benign envy. Another appealing finding is that the three-way interaction effect of supervisor support and creative self-efficacy is found to weaken the effect of knowledge hiding perception on employee creativity.

Originality/value

This is first of its kind study which is specifically related target’s knowledge hiding perception with their own creativity among IT professionals. This study further explores the mechanism of benign envy as a motivational drive through which target’s knowledge hiding perception enhances creativity. The cumulative role of conditional factors that affect knowledge hiding perception to creativity link from target’s perspective has also been clarified. Most of the studies focus on benefits of knowledge sharing and ignoring the outcomes of knowledge hiding.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Sarath Tomy and Eric Pardede

Start-up intention among university students is related to the image of entrepreneurship as a career alternative. University is critical in developing the levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

Start-up intention among university students is related to the image of entrepreneurship as a career alternative. University is critical in developing the levels of motivation and capabilities of graduates to effectively engage in entrepreneurial activity. The purpose of this paper is to propose an entrepreneurial intention model focussing on higher education and the implementation of the model as a practical digital application which can be used in universities to improve the entrepreneurial intention of students enrolled in different courses.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first discusses the importance of entrepreneurial intention in graduate entrepreneurship. Then, it proposes an entrepreneurial intention model based on the four propositions identified from the literature. Finally, the model is implemented as a practical digital application focussing on self-skill awareness, entrepreneurial resources and entrepreneurial support network. A survey is conducted with students to evaluate the model and the application.

Findings

Entrepreneurial awareness found to have a positive effect of entrepreneurial intention. Besides the conceptual model, this study has developed a digital application to enhance entrepreneurial intention of students focussing on information technology discipline. The application is evaluated through an online survey and the results show that the application can significantly improve entrepreneurial intention.

Originality/value

The proposed entrepreneurial intention model and the digital application offer guidance to universities as to how online systems can be used to create an environment that fosters individual intentions to select entrepreneurship as a career option, even for students doing non-entrepreneurial courses.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Min Zhang, Yunxiao Xue, Jun Yang and Yan Zhang

Members' knowledge contribution behavior has positive significance for maintaining the activity of the knowledge community, as well as for improving knowledge interaction…

Abstract

Purpose

Members' knowledge contribution behavior has positive significance for maintaining the activity of the knowledge community, as well as for improving knowledge interaction efficiency and member viscosity. With the development of the mobile Internet, knowledge communities based on social platforms have become more convenient and popular. This study aims to explore what and how factors influence members' knowledge contribution behavior in social knowledge communities from the perspective of social distance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theory of reciprocity and on the theory of self-efficacy, hypotheses and research models are proposed. In the empirical study, WeChat learning group is selected as the research case. The empirical investigation (N = 244) collects research data through questionnaires.

Findings

I-intention and we-intention both have positive influence on members' knowledge contribution behavior. Knowledge self-efficacy positively moderates the influence of we-intention and affects knowledge contribution behavior. In addition, I-intention is positively affected by expected knowledge benefit, expected emotional benefit and expected image benefit, while costs have no effect. We-intention is positively influenced by affective commitment, continuance commitment and normative commitment in relationship strength, as well as affiliation to the contributing climate.

Originality/value

This paper aims to discuss I-intention, we-intention, and their roles in members' knowledge contribution behavior. It is a beneficial development for existing research to combine the characteristics of new style communities with systematical analysis of knowledge contribution behavior. Findings may provide enlightenment to the social knowledge community on diversity development and differentiated marketing strategies.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Irfan Ali and Nosheen Fatima Warraich

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between mobile self-efficacy and personal information management (PIM) practices through mobile phones and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between mobile self-efficacy and personal information management (PIM) practices through mobile phones and smartphones, and additionally, to explore the challenges of using a smart device for PIM.

Design/methodology/approach

This study followed Preferred Reporting Items for the Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines to achieve the objectives. A comprehensive search strategy, inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria were formulated in light of PRISMA guidelines. The data were collected from different scholarly repositories, databases and core journals of PIM. The studies were included after four steps, i.e. identification, screening, eligibility and inclusion of studies.

Findings

Findings revealed that there was a positive relationship between mobile self-efficacy and PIM via mobile phones. People used two techniques for finding and re-finding information via mobile phones/smartphones. These techniques include browsing and searching information. People send information, share with others and save in draft folders to emails in mobile phones/smartphones for keeping information for future use. They organize their personal information in folders and use different applications such as Evernote, Google Calendar, alarm and organizer. They uninstall and update mobile applications with new versions, clear phone call history and backup personal information to desktop devices and cloud services to maintain personal information. PIM via mobile phone/smartphone challenges were also identified. These challenges were classified as information related challenges, technical challenges, mobile phone adaptability challenges and miscellaneous challenges.

Originality/value

This study will help library professionals and decision makers to devise information literacy instruction programs according to the users' needs. The results of this study will also open new horizons for system designers to devise mobile-based PIM tools according to users' needs.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Nosheen Sarwat and Muhammad Abbas

The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of creative self-efficacy and affective personal commitment on individuals' knowledge creation and innovative work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of creative self-efficacy and affective personal commitment on individuals' knowledge creation and innovative work behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a time-lagged field survey to collect data from a diverse sample across various organizations in Pakistan (N = 249 paired responses). Main and mediating effects were tested using bootstrapping technique.

Findings

The results revealed that affective personal commitment and creative self-efficacy significantly predicted supervisory-rated innovative performance directly and indirectly through knowledge creation ability (KCA).

Originality/value

The study uniquely contributed to the body of knowledge by developing and validating scales for KCA and affective personal commitment. In addition, the study contributed to the body of knowledge by examining the antecedents and outcomes of KCA.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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