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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Réka Vas, Christian Weber and Dimitris Gkoumas

Connectivism has been proposed to explain the impact of new technologies on learning. According to this approach, learning may occur even outside the individual within an…

Abstract

Purpose

Connectivism has been proposed to explain the impact of new technologies on learning. According to this approach, learning may occur even outside the individual within an organization or a system. Learning objectives are not defined in advance and learning requires the ability to form connections and use networks to find the required knowledge. The connections by which individuals can learn are more important than what they currently know. The purpose of this paper is to investigate if a measure, rating the importance of concepts, can be derived from a network representation of the learning domain and if highly connected concepts – with high importance value – can describe whether information is explored in such ways as assumed by connectivism.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors empirically examined if the proposed measure can provide insight on the role of connections in learning and explain the reasons behind passing certain parts of a test using a linear regression model.

Findings

The results are twofold. First, an implementation of the information exploration principle of connectivism has been introduced, applying semantic technologies and the importance measure. Second, although no significant effects could be isolated, trends in performance improvement concerning highly important concepts were identified.

Originality/value

However, connectivism has been known since 2005, it is still lacking for successful implementations. The presented approach of a concept importance measure is a promising starting point by providing means of connected learning, enabling individuals to effectively improve their personal abilities to better fit job demand.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

David O’Donnell

Habermas’ concept of communicative rationality, in which reason is construed in terms of the noncoercive intersubjectivity of mutual understanding and reciprocal…

Abstract

Habermas’ concept of communicative rationality, in which reason is construed in terms of the noncoercive intersubjectivity of mutual understanding and reciprocal recognition, provides a valid foundation on which the theory and practice of selves‐directed learning can be developed. In an increasingly individualized world a focus on learning networks allows a perspective transformation from the purely individualistic instrumental rationality of self‐directed‐learning towards communicative interaction via learning encounters and the possibility of satisfying the emancipatory conditions of communicative rationality within communities of selves‐directed‐learners in life and work. The orientation of communicative action to criticizable validity claims which are open to empirical investigation is the central core that makes this learning process both theoretically and practically possible.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 23 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2010

Barry Sugarman

The purpose of this paper is to understand how social networks can help to produce the “magic” of extraordinary results for organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how social networks can help to produce the “magic” of extraordinary results for organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

In this exploratory study four cases (from published reports) are compared in order to illustrate different management approaches to utilizing the power of networks.

Findings

Social networks can be central to a strategy for organizational transformation (OT), as in three of these cases. They can also be fundamental to a firm's mode of organizing from its inception business and permanently, as in the second case (W.L. Gore). The three cases illustrate several approaches to connecting social networking with management's OT strategies. An important difference exists between informal, autonomous networks and networks that “talk” to management.

Research limitations/implications

These cases illustrate what is possible, not what is typical. All four cases involve social networks already aligned to official goals. This exploration of networking in the service of OT suggests some hypotheses but cannot rigorously test them.

Practical implications

Social networks can create, contain, and convey much of a company's intellectual capital and can control much of its potential for “magical” improvement. The basic principles of OT (developing a learning organization) apply here.

Originality/value

The comparative study of four cases is fruitful but rare. Network literature mostly consists of single cases and surveys at a distance.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Sylvie R. Albert and Ronald C. Fetzer

The purpose of this research paper is to study the governance of smart/intelligent community projects through an analysis of the level of team effectiveness of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to study the governance of smart/intelligent community projects through an analysis of the level of team effectiveness of collaborative telecommunication networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a census of all Canadian smart community projects. A high‐performance team effectiveness instrument identified, through a performance score, whether smart community teams (board of directors or steering committees) are functioning as high‐performance teams. A total of 76 networks were found and 28 responded. Each network is managed by three to nine board members and therefore the researcher received 72 valid questionnaires.

Findings

Teams, in highly innovative and transformational environments, and involving a variety of community stakeholders, face more challenges in their ability to perform as a high‐performance team. They tend to perform reasonably well in assigning roles and goals, but are having more difficulty managing feedback, establishing a good structure, solving problems and managing relationships.

Practical implications

Smart/intelligent communities are reuniting several organizations to improve their community or region in social and economic terms. Their level of effectiveness could impact the achievement of group goals and thus impact all citizens within their geographic area.

Originality/value

The research provides additional information on the weaknesses that smart/intelligent communities are facing in managing their teams, which could lead to better solutions for network governance and collaboration within a multi‐organizational structure.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Chei Sian Lee, Hamzah Osop, Dion Hoe-Lian Goh and Gani Kelni

Through the lens of self-directed theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate if social technologies such as YouTube will be viable to disseminate educational…

Abstract

Purpose

Through the lens of self-directed theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate if social technologies such as YouTube will be viable to disseminate educational instructions and in the process empowering learners to take charge of their learning.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 150 educational videos on YouTube were selected and 29,386 comments extracted using the authors’ customized extraction software application. Sentiment and qualitative content analyses were performed.

Findings

Results indicate that YouTube can play important roles in facilitating online self-directed learning (SDL) as the findings uncovered a variety of learning and social affordances of YouTube. However, caution should be exercised as high views and well-commented videos might not imply quality and credibility. This study concludes that YouTube generally provides a conducive a learning environment that affords learners the resources to meet their SDL objectives.

Research limitations/implications

To the best of knowledge, this is the first study that investigates SDL in social media by combining both qualitative content and sentiment analyses. The study shows that such a hybrid approach of combining two diverse analytical techniques provides an innovative means to make sense of comments expressed in social media.

Practical implications

The results will help educational institutions and policy-makers to craft better programs for public education and create policies to help self-directed learners in evaluating online video resources.

Originality/value

Despite a wealth of literature on the use of technologies to support learning, the majority of work done to date has dealt in the classroom context. Studies on SDL using educational content on YouTube are limited. Hence, this research contributes by providing insights on how educational institutions can move toward the direction of building collaborative digital learning platforms with relevant educational instruction and resources to enable users to participate in lifelong self-learning and education.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Daniel Barrett, Janette Benson, Rhiannon Foster and Alan Leader

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conceptual basis and development of Prosper: an emerging and evolving self-directed network and movement for people with lived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conceptual basis and development of Prosper: an emerging and evolving self-directed network and movement for people with lived experience of mental health problems in South West London.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual principles from which Prosper emerged – co-production, recovery and social movement approaches – are outlined. The ways in which these ideas were translated into action, the guiding principles and operation of Prosper are then described.

Findings

An evolving self-directed network and movement has been developed that comprises around 150 “members” and a wider network of 20 service user groups across South West London. As well as open forums, collective actions fall under the themes of “create” (peer support, outreach, campaigns, training) and “collaborate” (partnership working with user-led organisations and a Recovery College, peer support networks, supporting the development of personal health budgets and local commissioning, and consultancy). This network has initially been funded by South West London and St George's Mental Health Trust with a view to it becoming an independent entity.

Originality/value

The innovative and evolving social network and movement for people with lived experience of mental health problems that is continuously influenced and changed by the skills, ideas and energy of its growing and developing membership could act as a useful model for others to follow.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Abstract

Details

Learning Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-431-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2008

Melanie Henwood and Bob Hudson

The adult social care system will increasingly be characterised by ‘personalisation’. Maximising choice, control and power over the support services that people access is…

Abstract

The adult social care system will increasingly be characterised by ‘personalisation’. Maximising choice, control and power over the support services that people access is to be achieved principally by development of personal budgets. Already there are signs that the Government wants to extend the model from adult social care and to apply it to other areas of public service. The most obvious areas where the model could be transferred are health services (particularly in respect of long‐term conditions), and support for disabled children and their families. This article draws on findings from an in‐depth study on self‐directed support commissioned by the Department of Health. It highlights some of the challenges and opportunities which arise for authorities attempting to engage with personalisation and to develop more integrated responses to people's support needs. It is clear that the ‘Total Transformation’ to which many aspire will not be achieved overnight, but equally this is an area of policy change which cannot simply be left to the enthusiasts.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Martin Routledge and Zoe Porter

Personal budgets are part of the Putting People First agenda in England and are at the heart of the biggest change in social care for decades. This article discusses the…

Abstract

Personal budgets are part of the Putting People First agenda in England and are at the heart of the biggest change in social care for decades. This article discusses the rationale and evidence base behind their introduction and focuses on the challenges to moving from small scale pilots to nationwide implementation.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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