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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Chien‐Chi Tseng

The purpose of this research is to explore the relationships among self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning; and the relationships among entrepreneurial learning

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the relationships among self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning; and the relationships among entrepreneurial learning and entrepreneurial performance through a literature review. This paper reviews the characteristics of self‐directed learning that are important in supporting entrepreneurial learning. A conceptual framework outlining the relationships among self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning is provided to illustrate how these relationships can enhance entrepreneurial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Key words are identified to use in the literature search. All of the several electronic databases available in the online library, including both journal and book sources, are used to search for resources, as well as Google Scholar and Google Search.

Findings

Entrepreneurs who learn and develop their self‐management and self‐monitoring skills have more opportunities to enhance entrepreneurial knowledge and experiences in the entrepreneurial development process. The research generates valuable outcomes and findings for future business and entrepreneurship study: self‐directed learning has emerged as an important area of inquiry in relation to entrepreneurial learning, as well as entrepreneurial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study was exploratory, based on the literature review. Further studies are needed using empirical research to examine why some characteristics of self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning are better used to enhance the outcomes of entrepreneurial performance.

Originality/value

The research constructs a conceptual framework to outline the relationships among self‐directed learning, entrepreneurial learning, and entrepreneurial performance. Value was created when self‐directed learning and entrepreneurial learning are identified as the key factors for the entrepreneurial performance.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Fahri Karakas and Alperen Manisaligil

The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the changing landscape of self‐directed learning (SDL) within the digital ecosystem based on the concept of World 2.0.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and builds on the literatures of self‐directed learning and Web 2.0 technologies to explore how self‐directed learning is being transformed in the creative digital era.

Findings

The paper outlines five transformations that change the landscape of workplace learning in the creative digital era: virtual collaboration, technological convergence, global connectivity, online communities, and digital creativity.

Practical implications

This paper gives extensive guidance on how HRD specialists and practitioners can transform their strategies to adapt to the training needs of employees in the creative digital era. The paper provides new ideas and vision for industrial trainers and human resource development practitioners on self‐directed learning.

Research limitations/implications

This article provides some future research areas and limitations.

Originality/value

This paper opens up new possibilities for self‐directed learning and discusses how self‐directed learning might be transformed in the light of technological and workplace changes. In particular, self‐directed learning might decrease the HRD/training costs significantly while providing employees with just‐in time training.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Yvette James‐Gordon and Jay Bal

For learning opportunities to exist in an organisation, adequate learning methods need to be available in the organisation. This paper looks at the various learning

Abstract

For learning opportunities to exist in an organisation, adequate learning methods need to be available in the organisation. This paper looks at the various learning methods for engineers in the design environment adopted by two automotive organisations. With greater work demands placed on the engineer and less time to learn, a more self‐directed learning approach is emerging. Emphasis is on the engineering design environment because of the continuous need for design engineers to keep updated with current engineering information, knowledge and techniques. By having the right learning climate and methods available in the organisation, the individual can engage in self‐directed learning; the effects of which are beneficial to organisational learning and the design engineer’s self‐development.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2018

Zamzami Zainuddin and Corinne Jacqueline Perera

This paper aims to examine the impact of the learning management system (LMS), in promoting students’ self-directed experiential learning using the flipped classroom…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of the learning management system (LMS), in promoting students’ self-directed experiential learning using the flipped classroom approach. This study further evaluates the effectiveness of integrating video lectures, perceived as a social interface, for students to watch, prior to their class session conducted in class.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study that investigated a group of undergraduate students of English as a foreign language (EFL) to identify the impact of the LMS TES BlendSpace in fostering their self-directed learning capacity, using a flipped classroom approach. Data were gathered through a qualitative approach from student interviews and observations of student activities and video-recordings uploaded on TES BlendSpace.

Findings

Flipped classrooms have begun to redesign learning spaces and promote active learning through video-enabled instructional practices. This study provides an overview of flipped classrooms and the benefits students’ gain from the wealth of online content posted on the LMS. The flipped classroom model has clearly shifted the learning paradigm, enabling students the autonomy of their self-directed learning pace and to become acquainted with the currency of video lectures that promote efficacious learning. This study concludes with implications for further research in this area.

Originality/value

This study has the potential to contribute towards the advancement of students’ self-directed learning and proposes its continued application for future EFL classes in this institution, as well as across all courses, to enable self-direction for all students.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2018

Han-Kuang Tien, Bang-Lee Chang and Yen-Ku Kuo

The purpose of this paper is to explore if experience stimulates or stifles creativity. It shows that accumulation of work experience improves an individual’s judgment and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore if experience stimulates or stifles creativity. It shows that accumulation of work experience improves an individual’s judgment and reduces divergent thinking of creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

This study examines the factors influencing individual creativity, including the impact of work experience, using 509 responses to questionnaires from 500 top construction companies. The research hypothesis is evaluated using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The main factors affecting individual creativity are a positive mind-set, self-directed learning, and low self-monitoring. Self-directed learning has the greatest influence on the creativity of individuals with accumulated work experience, while low self-monitoring influences the creativity of people with less work experience.

Research limitations/implications

A better way to study individual creativity is longitudinal research, which involves long-time observation of the life cycle of creativity among organizational members, who are like products with a life cycle. Further study is necessary to show why some members are creative only for a short time (short life cycle) while some are creative for a longer (very long life cycle) period.

Originality/value

This study finds that employee creativity derives from the self-directed learning process as it helps to accumulate experience. This result indicates that construction firms can train employees to improve their self-directed learning and boost creativity. Experienced workers need more attention because they are trapped in their previous experience and it is difficult to train them.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2015

Soon-Yau Foong and Choo-Hong Khoo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of accounting students’ attitude on their current knowledge enhancement intention and the moderating role of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of accounting students’ attitude on their current knowledge enhancement intention and the moderating role of the learning environment on the attitude-intention relationship. The relationship between current knowledge enhancement intention and level of current knowledge acquired is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Copies of a structured questionnaire were randomly distributed to 400 final-year accounting students from three major public universities and 243 completed questionnaires were analyzed.

Findings

Attitude is a significant predictor of students’ current knowledge enhancement intention, which, in turn, positively impacts their level of current knowledge. The learning environment significantly moderates the attitude-intention relationship. An inhibiting learning environment tends to accentuate the differences in current knowledge enhancement intention between students with good attitude and those with poor attitude toward current knowledge enhancement.

Research limitations/implications

The study has the limitations often associated with self-administered questionnaire research. The findings also may not be generalizable to other student and current knowledge settings.

Practical implications

There is a need to re-orientate the accounting curriculum design and the accounting academics’ attitude from one that is overly technical focussed to one that emphasizes on other competencies necessary for sustained professional success. Educators and teaching pedagogy that promotes a culture of lifelong learning and current knowledge enhancement among students should be encouraged.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap in the literature by examining the role of the learning environment not as a direct determinant of students’ attitude and their intention, but rather as a moderator of the attitude-intention relationship. The implication is that modifying the learning environment could facilitate or promote development of the desired attitude and hence, intention. The findings of this study support the moderating role of the learning environment in the relationship between current knowledge enhancement attitude and intention of accounting students in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Ree Chan Ho and Bee Lian Song

This study aims to examine live streaming experiences of business students’ at the tertiary education level, and how the use of this interactive platform satisfies their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine live streaming experiences of business students’ at the tertiary education level, and how the use of this interactive platform satisfies their affective, cognitive, social and hedonic needs in learning. Likewise, it explored the influence of live streaming class on the learning outcome needed in achieving self-directed learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the uses and gratifications theory, a conceptual framework was developed to discover the impact of interactive live streaming platform in meeting learners’ needs required for self-directed learning. A survey was conducted with a sample of 402 business undergraduate students from 5 universities. Data was analyzed with covariance-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study confirmed that learners’ gratifications gained from live streaming encouraged them to collaborate with the instructors in meeting the learning outcomes. The findings also supported that the interactive nature of live streaming offers the opportunity for students to learn independently. Thus, it sheds new light on how a live streaming learning environment can be further developed in promoting self-directed learning.

Originality/value

This study offers a novel understanding of live stream class adoption by examining learners’ needs from a uses and gratification perspective. It also contributed new insight to the existing literature on live streaming technology use in education to promote self-directed learning.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Lillie Lum, Pat Bradley and Nikhat Rasheed

Bridging education programs have been developed to enhance the ability of internationally educated professionals (IEPs) to access professional employment in Canada. IEPs…

Abstract

Purpose

Bridging education programs have been developed to enhance the ability of internationally educated professionals (IEPs) to access professional employment in Canada. IEPs are professionals who received their original training outside of Canada. Bridging education programs consist of specialized courses, offered by higher education institutions, focusing on skill and knowledge upgrading in preparation for meeting professional licensure requirements. The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into the preferred learning styles of IEPs enrolled in nursing, pharmacy and teacher programs.Design/methodology – This survey research assessed the learning styles/preferences and degree of self‐directed readiness of IEPs enrolled in three different Ontario bridging education programs: pharmacists, nurses and teachers. These professions represent some of the largest regulated professions in Canada. Three professions were selected for this study because they have similar regulatory procedures for candidates seeking licensure. These programs were situated within higher education institutions. Adult immigrant students participated by completing Kolb's Learning Style Inventory and Guglielmino's Self‐Directedness Scale.

Findings

The most significant finding of this research is that all three professions were found in the divergent quadrant of the Kolb Learning Style Inventory. The learner with a divergent style of learning prefers observation rather than action and is able to view concrete situations from multiple perspectives. These learners value concrete experience and reflective observation, suggesting that they tend to consider a situation from differing perspectives. This finding suggests that being a recent adult immigrant has a stronger effect upon preferred style of learning in bridging education than profession‐specific factors. IEPs are also illustrated to be highly self‐directed learners.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of these results must be treated with caution due to the small sample size. Several factors influenced the results such as difficulties in accruing a larger and more representative sample.

Social implications

Currently, substantial funding is provided for bridging education in Canada. There is little research being conducted on the effectiveness of this type of higher education from the perspective of learning processes. More research is needed to enhance the ability of IEPs to succeed in these programs. Ultimately, it can improve new immigrant professionals' success in the labor market.

Originality/value

Research on bridging education is still in its infancy and there is little research evidence to guide the development of effective programs. Some research indicates that bridging education programs are useful for providing profession‐specific language training and orientation to the Canadian workplace. If the preferred learning styles of immigrant professionals can be identified, more effective courses for immigrant learners can be developed. Educators can create increased academic success and improved employment outcomes.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Paul J. Guglielmino and Shuming Zhao

This paper examines the relationship of learning style and job performance in a sample of the workforce collected from a Commodity Driven Society (CDS), the PRC, and…

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship of learning style and job performance in a sample of the workforce collected from a Commodity Driven Society (CDS), the PRC, and compares and contrasts the data to a sample collected from a more Market Driven Society (MDS), Hong Kong, and a highly developed nation, the United States.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2018

Eamonn Newman and Margaret Farren

This purpose of this paper is to use autoethnographic methods to enable an individual to reflect on their learning practices and habits in their professional role in…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to use autoethnographic methods to enable an individual to reflect on their learning practices and habits in their professional role in computing and data science.

Design/methodology/approach

Action reflection cycles with autoethnographic methods are used in this enquiry to examine and transform the self-driven learning in the role of a professional in the context of computing and data science. Data are collected using personal thoughts and emotions in order to determine to what degree the changes that are brought about are improving their learning practice.

Findings

An incongruity between espoused theory and theory-in-use is identified. In this paper the authors explore how engaging in reflection within the structure of an action research framework can change the learning behaviour of an individual, motivating them to engage more positively and consistently with self-directed learning in their workplace environment.

Research limitations/implications

Through analysis of reflective journals key aspects of personal and professional life that influences the individual’s approach to the learning tasks is identified. In addition, activity logs are maintained which collect information on the tasks that are undertaken. These activity logs are automatically generated using specific task-tracking software. Double-loop learning (Argyris and Schön, 1974) helps to identify the values that underpin the learning practice.

Practical implications

By resolving the tension created due to the incongruity of values, the individual has been able to find more motivation for learning and thus become more engaged in the learning process.

Social implications

Participation in the knowledge economy requires individuals to engage in continuous learning. Organisations that support individuals in continuous learning are best adapted to take advantage of emergent and evolving knowledge and skill requirements.

Originality/value

This paper examined the behaviour of an individual engaging in self-directed learning and showed how through engagement with reflection and critical self-analysis, he increased his motivation and efficiency for self-directed learning. The authors show how this skill becomes increasingly important in modern knowledge economy workplaces.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

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