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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Jenny Byrne

This paper is based upon a small‐scale research project, which investigates the factors which primary‐aged schoolchildren perceive as causes of high and low selfesteem

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1701

Abstract

This paper is based upon a small‐scale research project, which investigates the factors which primary‐aged schoolchildren perceive as causes of high and low selfesteem. The findings indicate that schools may need to emphasise factors other than academic performance in order to raise pupils’ selfesteem. The research was undertaken in a class of 32 year‐five children using the Draw and Write technique. The findings show that the children perceive multiple factors affecting their selfesteem. Health issues, especially aspects of mental health, were considered very important factors in determining levels of selfesteem. The research also showed that children are affected by the desire to improve their social status and consider this a way of increasing their selfesteem. Affluence and the acquisition of material possessions were considered important avenues for increasing social status.

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Health Education, vol. 99 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Patrick West and Helen Sweeting

Challenges the assumption, prevalent in education and in health education, that a sense of high selfesteem is a key ingredient for success in educational achievement and…

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1307

Abstract

Challenges the assumption, prevalent in education and in health education, that a sense of high selfesteem is a key ingredient for success in educational achievement and the adoption of a healthy lifestyle. Describes the measurement of selfesteem and “street‐oriented” leisure among a cohort of about 1,000 young people aged 15 in 1987 who are the subject of the West of Scotland Twenty‐07 Study: Health in the Community. Finds that there is no relationship between selfesteem and health behaviours such as smoking, drinking, illicit drug use and early sexual experience. Also finds that 15‐year‐olds who were most “street‐oriented” were more likely to smoke, drink, have used drugs and to be more sexually experienced than peers who were not involved in this lifestyle. Defines two groups, “lost souls”, who have “low” selfesteem but who are neither very involved with nor very detached from school, nor very involved with or very detached from “street‐oriented” leisure; and “rebels”, who are very detached from school and who derive a sense of identity and selfesteem from “street culture”. Observes that it is encouraging that this latter group is to some extent aware of the risks of their unhealthy behaviours. Quotes data from a similar study among 11‐year‐olds, which suggest that the categories of “lost souls” and “rebels” already exist at earlier ages. Concludes that, although the aim of fostering selfesteem is a worthy one, it is unlikely to have the secondary effect of reducing the likelihood that young people will adopt unhealthy lifestyles.

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Health Education, vol. 97 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Upasna A. Agarwal, James Avey and Keke Wu

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via psychological safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a three-wave time-lagged design and data were collected from 388 full-time employees in India.

Findings

The results show that psychological safety mediated the impact abusive supervision had on knowledge hiding. Further, this impact was weakened by higher self-esteem as employees with higher self-esteem were less affected by the impact of abusive supervision on psychological safety and knowledge hiding; but this impact was amplified by more co-rumination as employees who co-ruminated more were also more affected by abusive supervision in psychological safety and knowledge hiding.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional design and the use of self-reported questionnaires are a few limitations of this study.

Originality/value

This study took a purposeful deviation from the traditional path of organizational justice to the study of abusive supervision and psychological safety and endeavored an alternate route, one of resource conservation. Further, employees have diverse reasons that heighten or dampen their inclination to hide knowledge from others in the workplace. The study examines co-rumination and self-esteem as possible boundary conditions.

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Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2013

Kyoungsu Kim, Fred Dansereau and In Sook Kim

Using five categories summarized by Bass (1990), this chapter attempts to address three key questions about charismatic leadership:

  • (1)
    What are the key behavioral…

Abstract

Using five categories summarized by Bass (1990), this chapter attempts to address three key questions about charismatic leadership:

  • (1)

    What are the key behavioral dimensions of charismatic leadership?

  • (2)

    How does charismatic leadership differ from other forms of leadership?

  • (3)

    Who may become followers of charismatic leaders and when do they become followers?

What are the key behavioral dimensions of charismatic leadership?

How does charismatic leadership differ from other forms of leadership?

Who may become followers of charismatic leaders and when do they become followers?

By focusing on Weber’s original view of charisma, we suggest that his three dimensions of charismatic leader behaviors underlie most contemporary approaches. By considering these three dimensions in more detail, we demonstrate how this view allows for different views of leadership and is distinguishable from management. Finally, by extending Weber’s view and by identifying two types of charismatic leaders who differ in their power motives, we suggest how the characteristics of followers and the context influence followers’ acceptance of charismatic leaders as legitimate. Some implications for leadership effectiveness are discussed.

Details

Transformational and Charismatic Leadership: The Road Ahead 10th Anniversary Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-600-2

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Thanos Papaioannou, Aggeliki Tsohou and Maria Karyda

This paper aims to identify the data elements that social network sites (SNS) users consider important for shaping their digital identity and explore how users’ privacy…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the data elements that social network sites (SNS) users consider important for shaping their digital identity and explore how users’ privacy concerns, self-esteem and the chosen SNS shape this process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted an online survey with the participation of 759 individuals, to examine the influence of privacy concerns, self-esteem and the chosen SNS platform, on the shaping of the digital identity, through a classification of identity elements that users disclose when using a SNS, the Rosenberg self-esteem scale and relevant constructs from the literature.

Findings

Findings reveal that users consider the name, gender, picture, interests and job as most important elements for shaping their digital identity. They also demonstrate that privacy concerns do not seem to affect the amount of information users choose to publish when shaping their digital identity. Specific characteristics of SNS platforms are found to affect the way that users shape their digital identity and their privacy behavior. Finally, self-esteem was found to affect privacy concerns and digital identity formation.

Research limitations/implications

To avoid a lengthy questionnaire and the risk of low participation, the respondents answered the questions for one SNS of their choice instead of answering the full questionnaire for each SNS that they use. The survey included the most popular SNSs at the time of the survey in terms of popularity.

Practical implications

The results contribute to the theory by furthering our knowledge on the elements that shape digital identity and by providing evidence with regard to the role of privacy and self-esteem within social networking. In practice, they can be useful for SNS providers, as well as for entities that design security and privacy awareness campaigns.

Originality/value

This paper identifies novel factors that influence digital identity formation, including the specific SNS used with its particular characteristics in combination with privacy concerns and self-esteem of the user.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Monideepa B. Becerra, Devin Arias, Leah Cha and Benjamin J. Becerra

The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of low self-esteem among college students and how exogenous and endogenous factors, such as experiences of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of low self-esteem among college students and how exogenous and endogenous factors, such as experiences of discrimination and psychological distress, respectively, impact such an outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

General education courses were used to conduct a quantitative cross-sectional study among undergraduate college students. The primary outcome variable of interest in this study was self-esteem, which was measured using the Rosenburg’s self-esteem scale. Primary independent variable was psychological distress (measured using Kessler 6 scale). Discrimination experiences were measured using the Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS). Descriptive, bivariate and multiple linear regressions were conducted to find associations among such variables.

Findings

Among 308 young adults in this study, psychological distress was significantly related to low self-esteem (ß = −6.50, p < 0.001). In addition, increasing EDS score (ß = −0.37, p = 0.019) and women gender (ß = −1.29, p = 0.038) were also associated with low self-esteem.

Research limitations/implications

The study was cross-sectional and thus cannot provide causal relationship. The self-reported data is susceptible to recall bias. College students continue to face negative social experiences that impact their self-esteem, and discrimination plays a substantial role.

Practical implications

Gender-specific self-esteem coaching is needed among college students with psychological distress and among those with experiences of discrimination.

Social implications

The results of the current study provide information for understanding the role of discrimination and psychological well-being on self-esteem of college students, and thus further address the importance of social determinants of health and well-being.

Originality/value

This study provides a unique insight into the disparities faced by college students. Understanding self-esteem at the individualistic and collectivistic levels will allow for the planning and implementation of comprehensive interventions that address gender differences and psychological distress that will increase the positive health outcomes and decrease the negative health outcomes.

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Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Kurt Matzler, Florian Andreas Bauer and Todd A. Mooradian

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether transformational leadership behavior is a function of the leader’s own self-respect and his/her evaluation of being…

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6179

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether transformational leadership behavior is a function of the leader’s own self-respect and his/her evaluation of being capable, significant, and worthy (self-esteem). It is also tested whether transformational leadership is related to innovation success.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 411 entrepreneurs and managing directors of small- and medium-sized Austrian companies. The proposed hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (PLS).

Findings

A strong and significant relationship between self-esteem and transformational leadership was found. Furthermore, data analyses revealed that transformational leadership has a positive impact on innovation success.

Originality/value

This study reveals the important but heretofore neglected role of self-esteem, defined as a manager’s overall self-evaluation of his/her competences, as an important predictor of transformational leadership.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Donald G. Gardner and Jon L. Pierce

This paper seeks to explore the relationships between organization‐based selfesteem and narcissism, and their correlates. It aims to distinguish the two constructs, as…

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5078

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the relationships between organization‐based selfesteem and narcissism, and their correlates. It aims to distinguish the two constructs, as well as to examine the degree to which organization‐based selfesteem is contaminated by “false selfesteem” (namely, narcissism).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants completed questionnaires containing measures of organization‐based selfesteem, narcissism, and a variety of motivational, attitudinal, and behavioral consequences. Co‐workers rated the participants' extra‐role and in‐role performance behaviors.

Findings

Organization‐based selfesteem and narcissism appear to be quite distinct constructs. The organization‐based selfesteem scale is unbiased by variance associated with narcissism. Organization‐based selfesteem is associated with a variety of positive outcomes. In particular, organization‐based selfesteem correlates negatively with hostility, while narcissism correlates positively with hostility.

Practical implications

The hypothesized negative attitudes and behaviors of narcissists were not found. However, organizations need to be cautious when delivering negative feedback to employees high in narcissism. Supervisors need to provide concrete evidence about deficiencies in narcissists' performance when providing feedback.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the relationships between organization‐based selfesteem and narcissism in an organizational context.

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

VieMing Tan, Farzana Quoquab, Fauziah Sh. Ahmad and Jihad Mohammad

The purpose of this paper is to offer empirical evidence on the role of self-esteem and social bonding in explaining citizenship behaviour of students at international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer empirical evidence on the role of self-esteem and social bonding in explaining citizenship behaviour of students at international university branch campuses (IBCs).

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 400 students from four IBCs in Malaysia was administered in a questionnaire. Data were analysed using SPSS and partial least squares 3.0.

Findings

This research demonstrates that students’ self-esteem and social bonds have positive direct effects on customer citizenship behaviour (CCB). Moreover, self-esteem has an indirect effect on CCB via intervening of attachment, commitment and involvement of social bonds.

Research limitations/implications

CCB of IBC students can be explained by self-consistency theory via mediation of social bonds from social bonding theory.

Practical implications

To encourage CCB in IBCs, university management should target students who have high self-esteem, closely tied to parents and lecturers, committed to university, highly involved in co-curricular activities and comply with university regulations.

Originality/value

Greater understanding of students’ citizenship behaviour may help transnational universities to improve relationship marketing strategy and enhance students’ campus experience.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Ann Edworthy and Beverly Cole

This paper aims to explore the effectiveness of parental counseling in developing selfesteem in children with neurological conditions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the effectiveness of parental counseling in developing selfesteem in children with neurological conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered via 92 questionnaires and 20 semi‐structured interviews with self‐selecting participants. Qualitative data were analysed through Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.

Findings

The research evidences a correlation between selfesteem of parents and child. Counselling can help create positive cycles which impact upon a child's selfesteem. Four over‐arching themes were identified by parents and these take the reader through a process of living with neurological conditions.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the research include a lack of differential between types of neurological conditions and/or identification of families of children who are born with neurological conditions as opposed to children who acquire them. Suggestions for future research include conducting similar research with a more specific cohort. The role of counselling in addressing trauma experienced by parents when a child acquires a neurological condition was also identified as a future research area.

Practical implications

It is suggested that counselling needs to be de‐stigmatised and made more understandable. Accessibility of counselling for parents, who sometimes find it difficult to leave the home, also needs to be addressed.

Social implications

Issues of socialising are explored which could help raise awareness of the impact of public attitudes upon parental/child selfesteem.

Originality/value

Research on the selfesteem of children with neurological conditions is limited, as is research into the impact of parental counselling on offspring. This paper explores these under‐researched areas and as such is of value to parents and relevant health professionals.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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