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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Wing Ming Cheung and Yin Cheong Cheng

School‐based management programmes have been launched in various regions of the world to enhance education quality in schools. Presents a multilevel self‐management

1174

Abstract

School‐based management programmes have been launched in various regions of the world to enhance education quality in schools. Presents a multilevel self‐management framework necessary for effective implementation of school‐based management. Proposes strategies for minimizing restraining forces and developing plans for effective multilevel self‐management in schools. Suggests three stages of implementation: unfreezing stage, changing stage and reinforcing stage. The time frame is critical for implementing the three levels of self‐management and, therefore, its management is discussed. Proposes seven types of skill required to work more effectively through the above stages, reduce resistance and gain support from school members.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Peggy M.L. Ng, Tai Ming Wut and Jason K.Y. Chan

Embedded in higher educational settings, work-integrated learning (WIL) is a key reflection to students' perceived employability. The purpose of this study is to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

Embedded in higher educational settings, work-integrated learning (WIL) is a key reflection to students' perceived employability. The purpose of this study is to explore the antecedents of internal and external perceived employability. The research attempts to test a theoretical model examining the relationships among human capital, work values, career self-management, internal perceived employability and external perceived employability.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 588 students who have internship experience from two self-financing higher education institutions in Hong Kong. We adopted structural equation modelling (SEM) to test the proposed research hypotheses.

Findings

Results support the idea that human capital and intrinsic work values are significant antecedents of perceived employability. Furthermore, this relationship is fully mediated by career self-management. The implications of the findings for understanding the process through which psychological variables affect an individual's perceived employability are discussed.

Originality/value

Previous studies have extensively examined the effectiveness of WIL in increasing graduates' employability. However, unclear focus has been given to examine psychological attributes, such as human capital, work values and career self-management in WIL. In addition, few researchers have empirically examined the linkages among human capital, work values, career self-management and employability through internships or WIL experiences. Therefore, to bridge these gaps, the present study examines the effect of human capital, work values and career self-management on students' perceived employability when gaining internships or WIL experiences in a higher education setting.

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Sally Hemming, Hilary McDermott, Fehmidah Munir and Kim Burton

Long-term health conditions are a significant occupational and global burden and can undermine people's ability to work. Workplace support for self-management of long-term…

Abstract

Purpose

Long-term health conditions are a significant occupational and global burden and can undermine people's ability to work. Workplace support for self-management of long-term conditions has the potential to minimise adverse work effects, by enhancing health and work outcomes. No data exist about employers' views concerning supporting workers with long-term conditions to self-manage.

Design/methodology/approach

The exploration of employers' views involved recruiting 15 participants with responsibilities for workplace health, well-being and safety responsibilities, who participated in a semi-structured interview about self-management and support. Data were analysed using a qualitative six-stage thematic analysis technique.

Findings

Self-management support is not purposely provided to workers with long-term conditions. Support in any form rests on workers disclosing a condition and on their relationship with their line-manager. While employers have considerable control over people's ability to self-manage, they consider that workers are responsible for self-management at work. Stigma, work demands and line-manager behaviours are potential obstacles to workers' self-management and support.

Practical implications

Workplace discussions about self-managing long-term conditions at work should be encouraged and opened up, to improve health and work outcomes and aligned with return-to-work and rehabilitation approaches. A wider biopsychosocial culture could help ensure workplaces are regarded as settings in which long-term conditions can be self-managed.

Originality/value

This study highlights that employer self-management support is not provided to workers with long-term conditions in a purposeful way. Workplace support depends on an employer knowing what needs to be supported which, in turn, depends on aspects of disclosure, stigma, work demands and line management.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Wing‐Ming Cheung and Yin Cheong Cheng

Argues for the importance of self‐management in ensuring quality of teacher performance. Aims to propose a framework of teacher self‐management and draw implications for…

6220

Abstract

Argues for the importance of self‐management in ensuring quality of teacher performance. Aims to propose a framework of teacher self‐management and draw implications for teacher training. Teacher self‐management is a continuous process comprising two self‐propelling cycles. The major cycle consists of five sequential stages, in which teachers as strategic actors will be aware of the changing education environment and able to readjust their personal goals and action plans to meet emerging challenges. The support cycle facilitates action learning in various stages of the major cycle. Practising in the major and support cycles, teachers may develop the necessary self‐renewal and competence for ensuring the quality of their professional work in the changing environment. From this conception of self‐management, the traditional staff development practice in school can be re‐engineered to maximize opportunities for facilitating teachers’ self‐management and self‐learning. For both pre‐service and in‐service teacher training, the self‐management theory can also bring alternative ideas for reforming teacher education programmes and preparing teachers for quality performance in a changing education environment. The implications should be useful not only to educational organizations but also to other professional organizations.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Monty L. Lynn, Matjaz Mulej and Karin Jurse

Under Josip Tito’s leadership, Yugoslavia broke away from Stalinistic central planning in 1948 and developed an economy‐wide system of worker self‐management. Its…

1453

Abstract

Under Josip Tito’s leadership, Yugoslavia broke away from Stalinistic central planning in 1948 and developed an economy‐wide system of worker self‐management. Its ideological focus was on leadership development and continuous learning among all employees, replacing owners and state bureaucracy with empowered workers at the helm of Yugoslav firms. Over time, the world’s largest experiment in empowerment went awry, however. A state‐supported neo‐Taylorism with a “thinking tank” and a separate “working tank,” evolved which represented little real empowerment. By the 1980s, self‐management had become an impotent bureaucratic formality behind a democratic facade. The dynamics within the rise and fall of Yugoslav self‐management provide lessons for understanding and managing empowerment efforts today.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 40 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Yin Cheong Cheng and Wing Ming Cheung

School‐based management (SBM) or school self‐management has been an important worldwide school restructuring movement since 1980s. This paper aims to map out how SBM in…

1254

Abstract

School‐based management (SBM) or school self‐management has been an important worldwide school restructuring movement since 1980s. This paper aims to map out how SBM in terms of self‐management at the school, group and individual levels is related to school performance at different levels. From a sample of 82 schools, the strength of multi‐level self‐management in school was found to be strongly related to the quality indicators of organizational performance, moderately correlated to the quality indicators of group social norms of teachers, and individual teacher job performances. The profiles of strong and weak self‐management schools were also found to be significantly different in most indicators of school performance at different levels. The findings provide preliminary evidence to support that the success of SBM implementation for achieving school quality depends on the involvement of the school, groups and individual teachers as a whole in continuous self‐management and self‐learning cycles.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

W.M. Cheung and Y.C. Cheng

Attempts to conceptualize a framework for understanding and implementing self‐management in school from a multi‐level perspective. Proposes that there are three levels of…

1297

Abstract

Attempts to conceptualize a framework for understanding and implementing self‐management in school from a multi‐level perspective. Proposes that there are three levels of self‐management in school; namely, the school level, the group level and the individual level. Each level of self‐management follows a self‐propelling and cyclic process comprising five stages. By following these self‐management cycles, the school, the groups and its individual staff members are sensitive to environmental changes and capable of self‐learning and development. In order to implement self‐management successfully, various conditions at the three levels are to be fulfilled. Also discusses the importance of school leadership and mission. It is hoped that this framework could provide a comprehensive view of self‐management in school and consequently contribute to the worldwide ongoing school management reforms and school development research.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1985

Michael Sewerynski

The Polish tradition of worker participation in the management of the enterprise dates back to 1918–1919. This tradition found its roots in the influence of the October…

Abstract

The Polish tradition of worker participation in the management of the enterprise dates back to 1918–1919. This tradition found its roots in the influence of the October Revolution in Russia, and independence activities in Poland, the councils of workers' delegates and factory committees. The task of the workers' delegates and factory committees was to organise workers, to insure the protection of their professional and living interests and to reopen and supervise factories left behind by invaders.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Ucha Mbofung

The purpose of this paper is to report on ongoing research examining the current level of self-management of library and information science (LIS) professionals in federal…

769

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on ongoing research examining the current level of self-management of library and information science (LIS) professionals in federal universities in Nigeria. The long-term objective of the study is to determine the effect of self-management on information services delivery of LIS professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive survey method was adopted to gather data from the LIS professionals in the selected 24 universities. The questionnaire was administered on 429 professionals (census) and all were received, processed, analysed and the results presented.

Findings

The study reveals that majority of respondents have high level of self-management and applied relevant strategies that enabled them identify opportunities and act on them for personal and professional growth.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to practising professionals in the federal university libraries but has implications for implementing continuing professional development for all professionals in similar institutions across Nigeria.

Practical implications

The study places emphasis on professionals, library management and library schools that they cannot downplay the relevance of self-management in the workplace, consequently training should be ongoing.

Originality/value

The future of LIS professionals has not been viewed in the light of adopting self-management competence on such a broad scale, and with a view to assessing how this skill can help change the perception of professionals to its relevant contribution to personal development and professional growth.

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Eva Cyhlarova, David Crepaz-Keay, Rachel Reeves, Kirsten Morgan, Valentina Iemmi and Martin Knapp

– The purpose of this paper is to establish the effectiveness of self-management training as an intervention for people using secondary mental health services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the effectiveness of self-management training as an intervention for people using secondary mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-management and peer support intervention was developed and delivered by secondary mental health service users to 262 people with psychiatric diagnoses living in the community. Data on wellbeing and health-promoting behaviour were collected at three time points (baseline, six, and 12 months).

Findings

Participants reported significant improvements in wellbeing and health-promoting lifestyle six and 12 months after self-management training. Peer-led self-management shows potential to improve long-term health outcomes for people with psychiatric diagnoses.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the lack of a control group, the positive changes cannot definitively be attributed to the intervention. Other limitations were reliance on self-report measures, and the varying numbers of completers at three time points. These issues will be addressed in future studies.

Practical implications

The evaluation demonstrated the effectiveness of self-management training for people with psychiatric diagnoses, suggesting self-management training may bring significant wellbeing gains for this group.

Social implications

This study represents a first step in the implementation of self-management approaches into mental health services. It demonstrates the feasibility of people with psychiatric diagnoses developing and delivering an effective intervention that complements existing services.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the effectiveness of a self-management training programme developed and delivered by mental health service users in the UK.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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