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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Richard K. Moule Jr, Megan M. Parry and Bryanna Fox

The legitimacy crisis faced by law enforcement has been suggested to be the result of a new media environment where citizens can record encounters with police and place…

Abstract

Purpose

The legitimacy crisis faced by law enforcement has been suggested to be the result of a new media environment where citizens can record encounters with police and place these recordings online. The purpose of this paper is to examine the motives of individuals who cop-watch, or record the police, but not the factors influencing visiting cop-watching websites.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross-sectional, national sample of 702 American adults, and drawing on theories of legal socialization and selective exposure, the current study examines the prevalence and correlates visiting “cop-watching” websites.

Findings

Approximately 9 percent of the sample reports having ever visited these sites. Results from a series of logistic regressions indicate legal cynicism is positively associated with having ever visited these sites, having done so recently, following these sites on social media and visiting these sites more frequently after Ferguson. Police legitimacy reduced the likelihood that individuals had ever visited these sites, but was unrelated to other outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the survey precludes discussion of causality, but results are fairly consistent with theoretical expectations.

Originality/value

The current study reflects an early attempt to understand correlates of public consumption of “cop-watching” material.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2019

Joonheui Bae, Sang Jin Kim, Kyung Hoon Kim and Dong-Mo Koo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between game items and mood management to show the affective value of game items. Specifically, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between game items and mood management to show the affective value of game items. Specifically, the study examines the impact of interaction between two negative mood states (stress vs boredom) and types of game items (functional vs decorative) on the purchasing intention of game items.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were conducted to predict the outcomes of using game items.

Findings

Game users effectively manage their level of arousal and mood valence using game items. The selective exposure theory provides additional understanding of different purchasing behaviors, suggesting that stressed users are more likely to purchase decorative items while bored users purchase functional items to manage their mood.

Research limitations/implications

The study results show the affective role of game items in mood management. While previous studies focused on the cognitive and functional aspects of purchasing game items, this study extends the value of game items as augmented products.

Practical implications

When launching new games, companies should provide game users free game items for mood management. In addition, to increase intervention potential and behavioral affinity, marketers need to develop and launch more game item types.

Originality/value

This study extends the understanding of affective value of game items by applying mood management and selective exposure theories to explain the purchase intention of game items.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Emily Vraga

Social networking sites (SNS) increasingly serve as a source of political content for Americans. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationships between types of…

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2948

Abstract

Purpose

Social networking sites (SNS) increasingly serve as a source of political content for Americans. The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationships between types of political content exposure, especially congruent vs incongruent content, and its effects on political expression and participation. This study pays special attention to whether these relationships differ depending on whether an individual affiliates with the Republican or Democratic party.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a representative national sample to examine the relationships among exposure to congruent vs incongruent political content via SNS, political expression, and political participation. This study also tests whether these relationships are consistent for Democrats vs Republicans.

Findings

The results suggest the effects of political content exposure on political expression on SNS depend on how many friends post about politics, as well as whether that content is congruent or incongruent with one’s political beliefs. Moreover, the relationship between exposure to congruent vs incongruent content, political expression, and political participation differs for Republicans and Democrats.

Originality/value

This study highlights the need for researchers to take more care in distinguishing the type of and the audience for political content exposure via social media websites. Further, if the relationships between seeing political content via social media and acting upon such content – either through posting behaviors or participatory activities – differs by political group, it raises the potential for disparities in democratic engagement.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2006

Janet L. Sutton, Linda G. Pierce, C.Shawn Burke and Eduardo Salas

Barriers to cultural adaptability include perceptual, interpretive, and evaluative biases. Differences in culturally based perceptual patterns can be problematic given…

Abstract

Barriers to cultural adaptability include perceptual, interpretive, and evaluative biases. Differences in culturally based perceptual patterns can be problematic given that interpretation and evaluation of behavior is a critical element of teamwork. Altogether, perceptual patterns are “selective, learned, culturally determined, consistent, and inaccurate” (Adler, 1986, p. 54). Selective exposure, selective attention, and selective retention are all hallmarks of the process of perception. Bagby (1970) demonstrated how perceptual patterns become selective even in childhood. He had American and Mexican children watch a bullfight and a baseball game simultaneously using a tachistoscope. When asked what they had seen, the American children claimed to have watched a baseball game, and the Mexican children claimed to have watched a bullfight. Neither group was aware that they had been presented two stimuli simultaneously. Both groups of children selected stimuli that had meaning for their culture and ignored or forgot the stimuli that had no meaning for them. The children's culture predisposed them to notice some things and not others. Perceptual selectivity is a key barrier to cultural adaptability and influences both interpretation and evaluation.

Details

Understanding Adaptability: A Prerequisite for Effective Performance within Complex Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-371-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Fawzi Dekhil

The main objective of this research was to measure the effects on sponsor recall1 at the soccer African Nations Cup (ANC) in Tunisia in 2004. This quantitative…

Abstract

The main objective of this research was to measure the effects on sponsor recall1 at the soccer African Nations Cup (ANC) in Tunisia in 2004. This quantitative investigation used a sample of 308 people who watched the event on television and/or in the stadium. The research demonstrates that there was indeed an effect by type of audience and other variables.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Florian Haumer, Laura Schlicker, Paul Clemens Murschetz and Castulus Kolo

This study strives to improve one’s understanding of tailored messaging as an organizational communication strategy that amplifies processes of organizational change at an…

Abstract

Purpose

This study strives to improve one’s understanding of tailored messaging as an organizational communication strategy that amplifies processes of organizational change at an individual level of personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

A scientific experiment was conducted to test the effects of tailored messages on self-reported employee engagement during an organizational change process.

Findings

The results show that tailored messaging improves employee engagement for change when messages fit the specific needs of different personality types. Conversely, message tailoring can lower employee engagement when messages do not match personality types. Further, message tailoring has different impacts at different stages of a change project.

Research limitations/implications

An employee's ability to change as a function of his professional skill set as well as the project type (e.g. digital transformation project, post-merger integration project, leadership change project) should not be neglected in an overall model that aims to explain the success factors of change management.

Practical implications

Obviously, proper targeting, timing, as well as the implementation of a valid, legal and feasible method for identifying an employee's personality as well as other individual characteristics are equally important and challenging to improve change management outcomes.

Originality/value

This study adds value to the discussion on the efficacy of message tailoring as a communication strategy for organizational change.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Joshua J.S. Chang and Mark David Chong

Internet fraud is an epidemic that costs US$7.1 billion as of 2007. The advent of the internet and proliferation of its use makes it an attractive medium for communicating…

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1699

Abstract

Purpose

Internet fraud is an epidemic that costs US$7.1 billion as of 2007. The advent of the internet and proliferation of its use makes it an attractive medium for communicating the fraud, particularly through the use of e‐mail. This paper aims to explain how victims of online fraud can be influenced by judgmental heuristics and cognition when they make nonnormative or sub‐optimal decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper will analyse the content of 14 recent fraud e‐mails to explain how victims of online fraud can be influenced from a psychological perspective, using theories of bounded rationality, judgmental heuristics and cognition.

Findings

The paper suggests that e‐mail fraudsters, whether intentionally or not, employ specific methods that correspond closely to how the human mind works within a context of bounded rationality. These methods have a propensity to exploit psychological blind spots in victims caused by selective perception and post‐decisional dissonance, as well as sub‐optimal or nonnormative responses in automatic behaviour due to the common use of heuristics (for example, representativeness, availability and affect) when making decisions in complex task environments.

Originality/value

Considering the current and widespread problem of online fraud, this paper is expected to inform and prepare internet users against such deception by offering a better understanding of how fraudsters can psychologically influence the way victims and potential victims make their decisions.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1976

G. A. Lancaster and M. White

Provides a comprehensive and critical analysis of work done in the field of industrial diffusion, adoption and communication. Suggests that work done in the diffusion of…

Abstract

Provides a comprehensive and critical analysis of work done in the field of industrial diffusion, adoption and communication. Suggests that work done in the diffusion of industrial markets is a slow process, and highlights the problems of conditional and causal‐factors in its examination. Presents a summary of those firms thought to be likely to be innovators.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

Philip J. Kitchen and David A. Yorke

Explores UK audience reception data provided by the Broadcasting Audience Research Board (BARB) and questions it with regard to new technology. Discusses technological…

Abstract

Explores UK audience reception data provided by the Broadcasting Audience Research Board (BARB) and questions it with regard to new technology. Discusses technological innovations with reference to changing from passive to interactive television viewing, and notes developments to remote control television, teletext, video recorders, computers, cable television and micro‐TVs. Puts forward the development of new technology and spotlights its possible growth areas but does warn that, at present, new technology is still at the innovation stage. States also that video recorders and remote control equipped televisions are presently in an early stage of development and use. Assesses types of households and selects four for questionnaire use. Gives tabular typology for types and illustrates these in depth. Concludes that technology is affecting audience receptivity to commercial breaks on television, and that media planners and commercial advertisers must regard current audience data as inconclusive.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Stephen Jolly

This paper argues that it is possible to make a scientific analysis of the process of persuasion as a function of the language used in any social interaction rather than…

Abstract

This paper argues that it is possible to make a scientific analysis of the process of persuasion as a function of the language used in any social interaction rather than merely the context in which that interaction takes place. In other words, persuasion is a rhetorical as much as a sociolinguistic phenomenon and persuasive language in itself constitutes a distinct register or style of speech.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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