Search results

1 – 10 of 20
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Youn-Kyung Kim, Sejin Ha and Soo-Hee Park

The purpose of this paper is to identify men’s clothing market segments based on store types and generational cohorts and the retail attributes.

Downloads
1322

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify men’s clothing market segments based on store types and generational cohorts and the retail attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 2,808 US male consumer data from Predictive Analytics survey were analyzed with correspondence analysis (CA) (to identify segments based on store types and generations), general linear model (GLM) (to determine what retail attributes were important to target each segment) and a Rasch tree model (to test items of each factor in their relative importance).

Findings

The CA produced three segments: Segment 1 (Gen Y male consumers who frequently shop at specialty stores), Segment 2 (Gen X males who frequently shop at discount stores and online stores) and Segment 3 (Baby Boomers and Seniors who frequently shop at department stores). GLM shows that fundamentals were important to all segments; experiential was most important to Segment 1, while promotion was most important to Segment 3. Rasch tree analysis provided specific information on retail attributes for each store type and each generation.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could employ both the importance and performance of retail attributes that are measured on a rating scale to understand consumers’ attitudes toward each retail format.

Practical implications

This study provided men’s clothing retailers with current insights into the male consumer segments based upon generational cohorts and store types from which they can better develop appropriate positioning strategies to satisfy the needs of each segment.

Originality/value

This study addressed the men’s clothing market, a growing but largely ignored market in the clothing industry and the retail literature.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 February 2019

Yun Jung Lee, Sejin Ha and Zachary Johnson

Flow is an optimal cognitive state that enhances consumer satisfaction. This paper aims to examine the effects of website features (product- and service-related cues) on…

Downloads
1156

Abstract

Purpose

Flow is an optimal cognitive state that enhances consumer satisfaction. This paper aims to examine the effects of website features (product- and service-related cues) on consumers’ flow experiences and how flow affects satisfaction with e-commerce.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses were collected from 556 respondents who had recently made purchases online. Factor analysis identified a measure of flow applicable within e-commerce. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test hypothesized relationships between product- and service-oriented cues on flow and the influence of flow on satisfaction.

Findings

Flow experiences were favorably (unfavorably) influenced by product (service)-related cues. Of the five flow dimensions identified, three (enjoyment, goal clarity and feedback) positively affected, one (telepresence) negatively affected and one did not affect satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Prior research recognized the importance of flow, but its role in e-commerce was unclear, as prior e-commerce flow measures were incongruous and traditional retail findings apply inconsistently online. By empirically establishing a counterintuitive link between controllable Web features and flow and demonstrating how the dimension of flow independently affect satisfaction, the understanding of flow is advanced.

Practical implications

Understanding the influence of controllable marketing factors on flow can help e-commerce managers enhance consumers’ flow experiences and satisfaction.

Originality/value

Product-related cues enhanced while service-related cues degraded flow perceptions, with the later effect running contrary to traditional retail findings. The authors assert that this negative relationship is based on consumers’ use of service-related cues online, which are needed when consumers fail to find information – representing flow disruption.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2018

Ran Huang, Sejin Ha and Sun-Hwa Kim

This paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of social media communication in luxury brand advertising from a narrative persuasion perspective. Specific purposes are…

Downloads
3063

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of social media communication in luxury brand advertising from a narrative persuasion perspective. Specific purposes are to examine how characteristics of a message giver (i.e. comprehension fluency, imagery fluency) and message receiver (i.e. transportability, need for affect) influence the narrative persuasion process which further affects consumers’ subsequent responses (i.e. positive affect, brand social networking services [SNS] attitudes and intentions) within the luxury hotel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was performed via Amazon MTurk. A total of 193 usable responses from SNS users were obtained. The structural equation modeling approach was used to test the proposed model.

Findings

Results show that comprehension fluency and imagery fluency as message-giver factors and transportability as a message-receiver factor positively affect narrative transportation. In addition, narrative transportation leads to positive affect, brand SNS attitudes and visit intentions, while positive affect also influences brand SNS attitudes and visit intentions. Furthermore, additional analyses indicate that narrative transportation mediates the effects of comprehension fluency on affect and brand SNS as well as the effects of transportability on positive affect, brand SNS attitude and visit intention.

Originality/value

Characteristics of a message giver and message receiver altogether are not well understood in the current literature. Empirical evidence in this study contributes to the social media marketing and brand advertising research fields.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Ran Huang and Sejin Ha

Drawn from the concepts of processing fluency and mental imagery, the present study aims to fill the void by developing the mechanism underlying consumers' cognitive…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawn from the concepts of processing fluency and mental imagery, the present study aims to fill the void by developing the mechanism underlying consumers' cognitive processing of visually appealing digital content in social media (i.e. Instagram) of retail brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered using a web-based survey method with consumers residing in the USA (N = 328). Structural equation modelling (SEM) was employed to investigate the proposed hypotheses. In addition, measurement invariance and multigroup analyses were conducted to test the moderation effect of need for cognition (NFC).

Findings

The results supported the pivotal role of mental imagery when consumers process visual messages in the context of a retail brand's Instagram. Both comprehension fluency and imagery fluency positively influence mental imagery, which in turn cultivates positive attitude towards the brand. The mediating role of mental imagery is confirmed. Furthermore, individuals' NFC interacts with imagery fluency but not with comprehension fluency such that high NFC strengthens the effect of imagery fluency on mental imagery. That is, when high-NFC consumers process information on Instagram, their perceptions of ease of generating imagery likely evoke visual representation of the brand's messages on Instagram in their minds.

Practical implications

This research provides feasible ways for brands to increase the effectiveness of digital marketing communications in social media (e.g. optimising of the contextual features of visual information and employing interactive features such as filters of social media to enhance processing fluency).

Originality/value

Within the context of digital retailing, this study provides a new perspective of consumers' imagery processing to investigate the effectiveness of visual-focussed messages.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Ran Huang and Sejin Ha

This study aims to investigate bystanders' perceptions and reactions to management responses to consumer complaints through digital service channels. Specific purposes are…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate bystanders' perceptions and reactions to management responses to consumer complaints through digital service channels. Specific purposes are to examine how management response (i.e. warmth, competence) and individual differences (i.e. bystander power) work together to influence bystanders' information processing of service recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

This research consists of two main studies which employed web-based experiments. Both studies used a 2 (management response: warmth vs competence) × 2 (individual power: low vs high) between-subjects design. A total of 240 participants were recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk platform in Study 1, and 233 participants were recruited from a market research company in Study 2.

Findings

Study 1 suggested that for the high-power group, warmth-related responses increased service perceptions (perceived diagnosticity and perceived fairness), and for low-power group, competence-related responses enhanced service perceptions. Study 2 confirmed the results of Study 1 and further demonstrated bystanders' service perceptions as the underlying mechanisms to connect the interactive effect of management response and individual power on satisfaction with complaint handling and WOM intentions.

Practical implications

The current research demonstrates how companies can effectively manage customers' experiences (i.e. bystanders' experiences) with service recovery management on digital platforms by demonstrating effective management responses to consumer complaints through digital service channels.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that explores bystanders' individual characteristics related to the information processing of service recovery through digital service channels.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2020

Jee-Sun Park, Sejin Ha and So Won Jeong

The purpose of this study was to update the fashion retail literature with an investigation of consumers' perceptions of in-store self-service technology (SST) and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to update the fashion retail literature with an investigation of consumers' perceptions of in-store self-service technology (SST) and their willingness to adopt SST for fashion purchases. Specifically, this study examined the relationships between technology readiness (TR), individual characteristics and the perceived pragmatic and hedonic qualities of SST.

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based survey was distributed to Korean consumers who had experience with in-store technologies. A two-step analysis including confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling was applied.

Findings

Both pragmatic and hedonic perceptions had significant impacts on acceptance of SST for fashion shopping. As for the roles of TR, innovativeness and optimism inherent in TR enhanced consumer perceptions of SST, while discomfort and insecurity did not.

Originality/value

This study extends the knowledge of consumer acceptance of SSTs in fashion retail by highlighting the need to consider hedonic qualities and examining the different roles of each TR dimension for a full understanding of SST acceptance.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Sejin Ha and Yun Jung Lee

This study aims to examine the relationships between consumer self‐confidence in health information search and health‐related outcomes (i.e. knowledge about cancer…

Downloads
2814

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationships between consumer self‐confidence in health information search and health‐related outcomes (i.e. knowledge about cancer prevention, healthcare behavior, and use of the web as a primary source for health information). The associations between self‐confidence in health information search and its predictors (i.e. health literacy and trust in health information sources) are explored as well.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey data. Stepwise linear regression analyses, a logistic regression analysis, and stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results from this study revealed that consumer self‐confidence in health information search appears to be linked with perceptions of health literacy and trust in information sources, particularly, trust in health professionals (e.g. doctors, healthcare professionals, government health agencies, family and friends, the internet), but not in information‐focused media (newspapers or magazines). Furthermore, as expected, consumer self‐confidence in health information search determines two health‐related outcomes, which are knowledge about cancer prevention and healthcare behavior.

Originality/value

The results of this study provide researchers with a better understanding about the key factors guiding consumers to have informed healthcare and enabling public health agencies to evaluate the effectiveness of their policies.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Sujin Yang and Sejin Ha

The main aim of this study is to develop a framework of brand knowledge transfer through sponsorship for sponsors within an insurance industry in South Korea. To this end…

Downloads
1306

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this study is to develop a framework of brand knowledge transfer through sponsorship for sponsors within an insurance industry in South Korea. To this end, this study explores: how pre-event brand knowledge and perceived sponsor–event fit contribute to post-event brand knowledge and if and how consumers’ attitudes toward insurance agents play a role as a moderator in the model. Brand knowledge is examined in terms of brand awareness and corporate image.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a paper-and-pencil survey method, data were gathered from consumers (n = 330) who participated in a parenting education program in which an insurance company partnered with a baby food manufacturer in South Korea. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results confirm the occurrence of brand knowledge transfer for sponsors via sponsorship. Pre-event brand awareness and corporate image affect post-event brand awareness and corporate image, respectively, while perceived event–sponsor fit affects both attributes of post-event brand knowledge. Further, consumer attitude toward sales agents partially moderates brand knowledge transfer.

Research limitations/implications

Because the data focused on a single segment of sponsorship events in the financial service industry in South Korea, the results must be carefully applied to other forms of sponsorship, industries and cultures.

Practical implications

This study highlights the effectiveness of sponsorship in the financial services industry. By aligning sponsorship events with sponsors’ characteristics and managing their brand knowledge, companies can maximize brand knowledge transfer contributing to brand equity.

Originality/value

This study identifies consumers’ pre-extant attitudes toward sales agents as a moderator that controls brand knowledge transfer, the pre-event and post-event corporate image relationship, specifically.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Jiyoung Kim, Sejin Ha and Clarissa Fong

This study aims to investigate consumer perception of community and employee oriented CSR program, and examine how retailers' CSR activities lead to social (i.e…

Downloads
2537

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate consumer perception of community and employee oriented CSR program, and examine how retailers' CSR activities lead to social (i.e. legitimization) and financial support. Further, by taking the social context into account, this research examine the moderating effect of consumer engagement in community social capital on the relationship between perceived retailers' CSR action and retailer legitimization.

Design/methodology/approach

Pre-test was conducted with 144 students to validate the measurement model. A total of 220 responses from US consumers were used for the main-test, and multiple group analysis in structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed in order to test the structural model.

Findings

The result indicates that when retailers are perceived as adhering to social norms through their CSR actions, they gain legitimacy and support from the consumers within the community. Further, consumer social capital moderates the relationship between perceived CSR and retailer legitimacy.

Practical implications

Findings of this research can provide retail marketers with practical implication in developing their CSR strategy catering to the community members. Understanding consumers with higher level of social capital investment will increase the capability and effectiveness of the retailers' CSR activities.

Originality/value

This research offers theoretical contributions to the current research stream of CSR studies by testing the moderating effect of consumers' engagement in the social environment on consumers' legitimization and support toward retailers that perform CSR activities. This study also provides new perspective on assessing the outcome of retailers' CSR actions by focusing on both social and financial dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Courtney Cucchiara, Soyeon Kwon and Sejin Ha

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of different label-message formats (positively vs negatively framed messages) on consumers’ purchase intentions in an…

Downloads
1463

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of different label-message formats (positively vs negatively framed messages) on consumers’ purchase intentions in an organic seafood shopping setting, along with the moderating effects of two individual characteristics (purchase-decision involvement and perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE)) on the message-framing performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 1,698 consumers of a supermarket chain in the northeast region of the USA using a web-based experiment.

Findings

Results of this study support the superiority of a positively framed message over a negatively framed message in persuading consumers to buy organic food. In addition, this effect of framing on persuasion is contingent upon different levels of consumer purchase-decision involvement as well as PCE concerning organic products.

Practical implications

This study offers managerial implications for marketers and retailers, messages appealing the environmental and health benefits of organic seafood consumption (positively framed arguments) would be more persuasive to increase consumer purchase intention than negatively framed ones. In addition, individual characteristics of their target market should be taken into account in communication design and implementation.

Originality/value

This survey research offers insights into the organic food consumption literature by validating the applicability of message framing in the organic seafood labelling setting and identifying consumers’ individual characteristics (purchase-decision involvement regarding organic seafood and PCE) moderating the message framing effectiveness.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 20