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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2009

Viktoria Baklanova

In July 2008 the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published three proposals relating to the use of credit ratings in its rules and forms. The proposals were…

Abstract

In July 2008 the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published three proposals relating to the use of credit ratings in its rules and forms. The proposals were designed to address concerns that the misuse of credit ratings may have contributed to the current crisis. The SEC sought market feedback regarding the effect the removal of credit rating references may produce on the markets.

This article examines the use of ratings by various market constituents, analyzes the details of the SEC proposals, and reviews the provided feedback. The main finding is that the majority of the market participants opposed the SEC proposals. Fiduciaries and regulated entities are looking to regulators to offer a common measure of risk, stable, accurate and free of conflict of interests.

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Credit, Currency, or Derivatives: Instruments of Global Financial Stability Or crisis?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-601-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1979

G.H. Lawson and Richard Pike

Though of fairly recent origin, the capital‐asset pricing model (CAPM) is becoming a dominant influence in the analysis of financial and investment decisions. While…

Abstract

Though of fairly recent origin, the capital‐asset pricing model (CAPM) is becoming a dominant influence in the analysis of financial and investment decisions. While continuing to undergo stringent theoretical and empirical examination, the demonstrable explanatory and predictive ability of the CAPM have led to its widespread recognition as the foundation of modern financial management. Though usually attributed to Sharpe, Lintner and Mossin, the origins of the CAPM can be traced back to the celebrated work of Harry Markowitz on portfolio selection.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Russel Poskitt and Peihong Yang

This study investigates the impact of the enhanced continuous disclosure regime introduced in December 2002 on several measures of information risk in NZX‐listed stocks…

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of the enhanced continuous disclosure regime introduced in December 2002 on several measures of information risk in NZX‐listed stocks. We employ two microstructure models and an intraday data set to measure information risk in a sample of 71 stocks. Our empirical results show that the reforms enacted in December 2002 had no significant effect on either the level of information‐based trading or the adverse selection component of market spreads in our sample of NZX‐listed stocks.

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Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

S.M. Solaiman

The purpose of this paper is to discover the weaknesses of initial public offering (IPO) regulation in Bangladesh in the light of the relevant law and practice in Australia.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discover the weaknesses of initial public offering (IPO) regulation in Bangladesh in the light of the relevant law and practice in Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative analysis of archival materials has been carried out to achieve the objective of the paper. Two different sets of legal provisions dealing with some selected issues relevant to the regulation primary share markets have been compared and contrasted. The level of market development, composition and performance of securities regulators and the level of investor sophistication have been critically in this paper in discussing aspects of regulation.

Findings

This paper finds that the IPO regulation in Bangladesh is weaker than that in Australia. The major weaknesses may be attributed to different factors such as the adoption of the disclosure philosophy prematurely by discarding the previous merit regulation in 1999 for a pre‐emerging securities market, lack of experienced and well‐trained people in the composition of securities regulators, lack of regulatory authority to sue for compensation on behalf of investors in the absence of shareholders class action, lack of authority to regulate auditors and lawyers who play significant roles in preparing defective prospectuses for public consumption. Findings also suggest that adequate investor protection cannot be ensured by regulatory measures alone, investors should be educated to protect themselves in the first place against the cupidity of issuers.

Originality/value

It provides an insight into an effective IPO regulatory regime. An immediate implementation of the recommendations made in this paper may contribute to improving the legal and regulatory regime for the primary share market in Bangladesh which may set a good example for others.

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Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Lu'ayy Minwer Al‐Rimawi

This is the second of two papers which examine the question of whether Arab securities regulations can be the subject matter of a methodological study in comparative…

Abstract

This is the second of two papers which examine the question of whether Arab securities regulations can be the subject matter of a methodological study in comparative securities regulation, especially with reference to EU regulations. Part One was published in Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance Volume Eight, Number Four. This paper addresses the specific juridical impact of Shari'a on capital markets, before looking at its impact on capital market laws of Jordan, Kuwait and Oman. In order to provide an empirical insight into existing Arab securities regulations, the paper also surveys the securities and company laws in the aforementioned countries. Such a discussion also includes a brief examination of market conditions, especially the early factors that accompanied the genesis of such Arab securities markets, notably in Kuwait. The paper concludes by addressing the question of the suitability of the Arab markets selected for this study to comparative studies in EU securities regulation, especially in the context of contemporary internationalisation of securities regulation. It explains in the process why the European experience is relevant (particularly in light of the many EU—Arab association agreements to take effect from 2010, together with EU ‘harmonisation’, ‘minimum standards’, and ‘single passport’ regulatory concepts).

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

J. Colin Dodds and Richard Dobbins

Although the focus of this issue is on investment in British industry and hence we are particularly concerned with debt and shares, the transactions and holdings in these…

Abstract

Although the focus of this issue is on investment in British industry and hence we are particularly concerned with debt and shares, the transactions and holdings in these cannot be separated from the range of other financial claims, including property, that are available to investors. In consequence this article focuses on an overview of the financial system including in Section 2 a presentation of the flow of funds matrix of the financial claims that make up the system. We also examine more closely the role of the financial institutions that are part of the system by utilising the sources and uses statements for three sectors, non‐bank financial institutions, personal sector and industrial and commercial companies. Then we provide, in Section 3, a discussion of the various financial claims investors can hold. In Section 4 we give a portrayal of the portfolio disposition of each of the major types of financial institution involved in the market for company securities specifically insurance companies (life and general), pension funds, unit and investment trusts, and in Section 4 a market study is performed for ordinary shares, debentures and preference shares for holdings, net acquisitions and purchases/sales. A review of some of the empirical evidence on the financial institutions is presented in Section 5 and Section 6 is by way of a conclusion. The data series extend in the main from 1966 to 1981, though at the time of writing, some 1981 data are still unavailable. In addition, the point needs to be made that the samples have been constantly revised so that care needs to be exercised in the use of the data.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 11 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Richard Dobbins

Sees the objective of teaching financial management to be to helpmanagers and potential managers to make sensible investment andfinancing decisions. Acknowledges that…

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Abstract

Sees the objective of teaching financial management to be to help managers and potential managers to make sensible investment and financing decisions. Acknowledges that financial theory teaches that investment and financing decisions should be based on cash flow and risk. Provides information on payback period; return on capital employed, earnings per share effect, working capital, profit planning, standard costing, financial statement planning and ratio analysis. Seeks to combine the practical rules of thumb of the traditionalists with the ideas of the financial theorists to form a balanced approach to practical financial management for MBA students, financial managers and undergraduates.

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Management Decision, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2011

Liu Jianghui

The purpose of this paper is to explore the reasons for the high‐frequency switches of lead underwriters by Chinese listed companies in their seasoned equity offerings. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the reasons for the high‐frequency switches of lead underwriters by Chinese listed companies in their seasoned equity offerings. It contributes to the literature by filling the gap and providing evidence that institutional and non‐market factors could affect listed companies' decisions to switch their lead underwriters in the Chinese capital market.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a numerical measure of listed companies' loyalty to evaluate their frequency of switching lead underwriters, and employs a Logit model and an OLS model to identify the key determinants of switching lead underwriters by Chinese listed companies.

Findings

It is observed that the frequency of switching lead underwriters is very high among Chinese listed companies for their seasoned offerings. It is also found that underwriters' deficient reputation and the lack of industrial experience, together with the depreciation of relationship‐specific assets, could have important impacts on lead underwriters being frequently switched in China. Besides, the frequent switches of lead underwriters could also be attributable to the non‐market supervision and regulatory influences by Chinese authorities over the security underwriting market.

Originality/value

This paper could help further the understanding of the factors that could explain the listed companies' frequent switches of their lead underwriters for their seasoned offerings in China. In addition, this paper has policy implications on how to improve the listed companies' loyalty for regulators in China. These implications could help improve the regulatory environment and promote the overall performance of the Chinese security underwriting market.

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Alberto Fuertes and Jose María Serena

This paper aims to investigate how firms from emerging economies choose among different international bond markets: global, US144A and Eurobond markets. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how firms from emerging economies choose among different international bond markets: global, US144A and Eurobond markets. The authors explore if the ranking in regulatory stringency –global bonds have the most stringent regulations and Eurobonds have the most lenient regulations – leads to a segmentation of borrowers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a novel data set from emerging economy firms, treating them as consolidated entities. The authors also obtain descriptive evidence and perform univariate non-parametric analyses, conditional and multinomial logit analyses to study firms’ marginal debt choice decisions.

Findings

The authors show that firms with poorer credit quality, less ability to absorb flotation costs and more informational asymmetries issue debt in US144A and Eurobond markets. On the contrary, firms issuing global bonds – subject to full Securities and Exchange Commission requirements – are financially sounder and larger. This exercise also shows that following the global crisis, firms from emerging economies are more likely to tap less regulated debt markets.

Originality/value

This is, to the authors’ knowledge, the first study that examines if the ranking in stringency of regulation – global bonds have the most stringent regulations and Eurobonds have the most lenient regulations – is consistent with an ordinal choice by firms. The authors also explore if this ranking is monotonic in all determinants or there are firm-specific features which make firms unlikely to borrow in a given market. Finally, the authors analyze if there are any changes in the debt-choice behavior of firms after the global financial crisis.

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Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Lu'ayy Minwer Al‐Rimawi

This paper examines comparative aspects of Arab securities regulation. It provides a general introduction, overviews the aims of securities regulation and the UK…

Abstract

This paper examines comparative aspects of Arab securities regulation. It provides a general introduction, overviews the aims of securities regulation and the UK regulatory framework, and outlines the obstacles facing equity financing under Shari'a and hindrances to effective Arab securities regulation. It accounts for the major macroeconomic reasons which have enhanced interest in Arab securities markets, examines lack of Arab rules on fraud, insider dealing and possible contractual remedies. It concludes with a case study shedding light on the term ‘securities’ as understood by Article 3 of the 1997 Jordanian Securities Act.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

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