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Article

Marina Toledo de Arruda Lourenção and Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi

The purpose of this paper is to propose an identity model for sector brands and examines its applicability for the Brasil Fashion System brand.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an identity model for sector brands and examines its applicability for the Brasil Fashion System brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature on corporate brand identity models is undertaken. The interviews were carried out with two interest groups: the associations comprising the brand, and the consultancy company responsible for sector brand advisory.

Findings

The sector brand identity model is applicable to the Brasil Fashion System brand with the exception of two elements. The application may have experienced some adversity because of the considerable divergence among the associations. In cases where the brand represents just one association, the application of the model may occur with more favorable element management.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretical contribution occurred toward sector brands and brand identity with the development of an identity model for the sector brand, so far not addressed in academic studies.

Practical implications

When adopting the identity model for sector brands, managers would be able to understand the components that have to be managed on sector brand identity. The model can contribute to improve the management of these kinds of brands.

Originality/value

The academic studies of corporate brand identity models and sector brands are analyzed in order to create the first sector brand identity model that was experienced by the Brazilian fashion industry.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article

Hogne Lerøy Sataøen

This paper concerns public sub-sector branding within the higher education (HE) system. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how public sub-sector branding within…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper concerns public sub-sector branding within the higher education (HE) system. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how public sub-sector branding within HE is organized and how it is influenced by the use of national values, traits and characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study relies on two data sources: first, the paper benefits from a data set of one-stop web-portals for HE from the 23 countries listed in Times Higher Education’s top-60 universities ranking. Second, it builds on a sample and brief overview of Norway’s sub-sector branding of its HE sector.

Findings

Expert authorities within the HE sector are legally and organizationally responsible for sub-sector branding, and they establish coordinated and coherent web-portals. In practice, however, nation-branding concerns are influencing on how the HE sub-sector is branded. The paper concludes with a discussion of democratic implications, and points to paradoxes arising from the use of national clichés and characteristics in this highly international sub-sector of the public realm.

Originality/value

The paper informs discussions about public sub-sector branding within HE, a phenomenon that thus far has not been systematically studied. The practical applications of such a study are evident, as branding is becoming more important in the public sector in general, and in HE in particular.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article

Tim A. Mau

Public services around the world are grappling to enhance their leadership capacity. One approach is to provide leadership training and development to public servants…

Abstract

Purpose

Public services around the world are grappling to enhance their leadership capacity. One approach is to provide leadership training and development to public servants, while another would be to target and hire individuals with proven leadership ability. The purpose of this paper is to focus on that latter strategy by critically examining the concept of branding the public service as an employer of choice as a means of recruiting and retaining sufficient leadership capacity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins by outlining the challenge faced by governments to recruit the best and brightest employees into the public service. It then reviews the literature on the concept of branding as an employer of choice, including its perceived advantages and limitations, before undertaking a case study analysis of the 2007 public sector branding initiative of the Canadian federal government.

Findings

It is very difficult to develop a single, master brand given the diversity and complexity of the hundreds of organizations that comprise the public sector. While it may be a popular concept for private sector organizations, the concept of branding the public sector as an employer of choice has yet to demonstrate its merit. Canada, which was ostensibly the vanguard in terms of public sector branding, has been unable to position the federal public service as an employer of choice.

Originality/value

There is very little research on the use of branding as an employer of choice in the public sector. This paper contributes to the knowledge about the limitations of such strategies for ensuring that the public sector has the requisite leadership capacity.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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Article

Marina Toledo de Arruda Lourenção, Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi and Vish Maheshwari

The purpose of the present study is to propose identifying similar characteristics and managerial actions of the sector brand identity elements among the associations that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present study is to propose identifying similar characteristics and managerial actions of the sector brand identity elements among the associations that compound the Brasil Fashion System (BFS) brand.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative research was developed through in-depth interviews conducted with associations of the Brazilian fashion sector.

Findings

The results indicate that there are characteristics of the elements of brand identity that are similar between the associations that compound the BFS brand. However, there are also several distinct characteristics among them, which makes it difficult, in large part, to consolidate the brand identity of the Brazilian fashion industry abroad.

Research limitations/implications

Moreover, it was indicated that for sectorial brand cases with a great divergence among brand partners, the creation of sub-sectorial brand specific for each partner could bring better results, as in this way, brands could be created with more suitable attributes for each partner, which will better suit their target audiences.

Practical implications

A practical contribution is also obtained, as the study can help in elaborating upon improvements for the sectorial brands that represent a large partners group.

Originality/value

An empirical evidence of how to identify common attributes between sectorial brand partners was presented to have a consolidated brand image in the external market.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

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Article

Swati Yeravdekar and Abhishek Behl

Management education has assumed phenomenal prominence in India in recent years, with branding being a prime factor used as a yardstick, rather a benchmark or point of…

Abstract

Purpose

Management education has assumed phenomenal prominence in India in recent years, with branding being a prime factor used as a yardstick, rather a benchmark or point of reference, for one institution having an edge over the other. The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors leading to branding of management education in India. It proposes two frameworks using Total Interpretive Structural Model (TISM) for public and private sector management colleges. For this purpose, variables are extracted using systematic literature review, which play a crucial role in changing the dynamics of college rankings. The inquiry distinctly examines the nature of relationship between them for public and private colleges offering higher education. The study further proposes strategies for improvement of rankings by discussing the hierarchy and interrelationship among the enablers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses Interpretive Structural Model (ISM) to ascertain the linkages between the variables, and employs TISM to validate the reasons of association. The model was fabricated by consulting the experts from various spheres closely allied to branding and higher education, including the private agencies and decision makers in the selected colleges. The variables were furthermore structured for classification using Matrice d’Impacts Croises-Multiplication Appliqué an Classment Analysis.

Findings

It was observed that the variables behave differently when studied from the perspective of private sector colleges and public sector colleges; the former have seven levels of arrangement while it is only four for the latter. Quality of Faculty and Research were the key areas of concern for private sector colleges while infrastructure featured as a focal point for those in public sector. It was also evident that the placement of variables and their flow were different. Rankings should thus be premeditated differently for both the sectors and different weights should be assigned to rank the colleges.

Research limitations/implications

The study is confined to branding of management education institutes in India, without considering other important disciplines for generalizing the framework. It is based on literature review followed by ISM, while other approaches such as ethnographic research methods and appreciative inquiry could have been possible alternatives as well.

Practical implications

The paper helps in developing different frameworks for private and public sector institutes, which would assist them to have a homogenous completion within their respective sectors. The study can be used to measure the performance of colleges on various parameters and gives them linking variables to enhance their productivity.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the need for developing a different barometer to measure the performance of private sector and public sector colleges offering higher education.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Bikram Jit Singh Mann and Mandeep Kaur

The paper aims to analyze and compare the branding strategies used in the three sectors namely FMCG, services and durables.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to analyze and compare the branding strategies used in the three sectors namely FMCG, services and durables.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review, a more comprehensive list of branding strategies is proposed. A content analysis of 600 randomly selected brands, 200 from each sector, is performed. The branding strategies used in the three sectors are explained and MANOVA is conducted to test the hypotheses about differences in the branding strategies across the three sectors.

Findings

The results reveal that the branding strategies vary across the three sectors. Single corporate brand strategy is predominantly used for durables and credence services. On the other hand, in case of FMCG and experience services, individual brand type endorsed by the corporate brand type is the most frequently used branding strategy. Thus, there is a trend towards corporate branding as corporate brand type is popular in all the sectors. Also, other than the single corporate brand strategy, as in case of durables and credence services, single brand type strategy is rarely used. For FMCG brands and experience services brands, companies are trying to leverage brand equity of two or more brand types.

Practical implications

The paper offers insights for designing branding strategies when branding a product/service. Brand managers may rely on corporate brand type when risk associated with a purchase is high, as in case of durables and credence services. However, when the risk associated is low, as in case of FMCG and experience services, individual brand type may be preferred, but at the same time, it should be endorsed by corporate brand type.

Originality/value

This study adds value to the growing body of literature on branding strategies by identifying a more comprehensive and simplistic list of branding strategies which is a major contribution of the paper. Further, this is one of a very few empirical studies on branding strategies and is a pioneering attempt to evaluate the branding strategies in the FMCG vis‐à‐vis services vis‐à‐vis durables sectors. It empirically substantiates that the three sectors are heterogeneous among themselves and homogeneous within themselves with respect to their branding strategies.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article

Dag Yngve Dahle and Arild Wæraas

Internal aspects of public sector branding have received limited attention in existing research. The purpose is to examine, firstly, how public managers experience and…

Abstract

Purpose

Internal aspects of public sector branding have received limited attention in existing research. The purpose is to examine, firstly, how public managers experience and handle the tension between empowering employees to be dedicated brand ambassadors while at the same time regulating their voice, and secondly, to outline some implications of aligning employee voice with the organization's brand, especially for the public interest.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on two sources of data. The first includes official admission statistics for high schools in Oslo, Norway, for 2018/2019. Schools in Oslo, a city which has introduced a competitive secondary education market, fall into three admission levels based on points necessary for entry. The second source is semi-structured interviews with principals in 15 high schools on different admission levels.

Findings

Most of the principals were concerned about how marketization of the high schools leads to a skewed distribution of students and an increasing divide between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ schools, but signalled market adaptation through their handling of employee voice. Due to reputation and branding concerns in the competition for students and funding, voice restrictions, not brand ambassadorship, was the preferred strategy to ensure brand alignment. The consequence of this strategy, the paper argues, is public silence at the expense of the public interest.

Research limitations/implications

Not interviewing teachers or middle managers may be seen as a limitation, but principals were chosen as they are the main decision makers and strategists in high schools. Using a qualitative research design may be a limitation, but this design was chosen as it seems appropriate in order to uncover the school executives' perceptions, experiences and thoughts.

Practical implications

Selling the brand to employees and enabling them to further sell it to external stakeholders is an enticing ideal but perhaps less possible to implement in reality for public sector organizations facing strong market mechanisms because the concern for the brand image takes precedence. Public sector managers should exercise care when managing employee voice so as to not negatively influence employees’ commitment to the brand. They should also be aware of the implications of voice restrictions for the public interest. Public silence may cause a less informed public with limited possibilities to make informed school choices and knowing how money is spent.

Originality/value

The present study is among the first to explore internal aspects of public sector branding. Researching the position of employee voice in brand alignment strategies is a novel contribution. The study is unique in its focus on the implications of branding for the public interest.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

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Article

Virginia Aparecida Castro and Janaina de Moura Engracia Giraldi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if shared brands provide sustainable competitive advantage according to an adapted valuable, rare, imitability/replaceability…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if shared brands provide sustainable competitive advantage according to an adapted valuable, rare, imitability/replaceability and organization (VRIO) model to the Brazilian wine sector in the opinion of the government agencies, associations and managers of the wineries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was based on a qualitative and exploratory research, based on in-depth interviews. Fine wines that have geographical indications and are located in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul were analyzed and content analysis was used to explore data.

Findings

It was concluded that shared brands in the Brazilian wine sector can be considered a source of sustainable competitive advantage according to the resource-based view.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative research has the aspect of the subjectivity of the researcher when analyzing the data.

Practical implications

The government agencies, associations and wineries can improve the production process and seek certified products for commercialization in the domestic and foreign markets. These contributions may also, in practice, be used by other sectors and countries.

Originality/value

This work contributes to the understanding of the shared brand’s concept, including geographical indications, collective brands and the sector brands. The proposition that shared brands provide sustainable competitive advantage, according to an adapted VRIO model was confirmed. Barney’s VRIO framework (Barney, 1991, 1995) hitherto thought for individual companies, has the letter “O” of Organization replaced by the letter “A” of Association, becoming VRIA. The authors found that the four conditions that form the here proposed acronym VRIA are valuable, rare, imperfectly imitable/replaceable and association.

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Article

Francisco J. Sarabia-Sanchez and Maria. J. Cerda-Bertomeu

A place brand is a public instrument for territorial development that needs a strategic design that is made by the public sector with the support of experts. To ensure…

Abstract

Purpose

A place brand is a public instrument for territorial development that needs a strategic design that is made by the public sector with the support of experts. To ensure that this design has the greatest chances, there should be an alignment between them regarding how the public sector should act when designing the place brand. This study aims to analyze the alignment and polarization among experts regarding this topic and whether experts with different place brand visions show different expectations in the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A Web survey was conducted using a sample (n = 260) of four types of experts (politicians, scholars, public managers and consultants) in Latin America and Spain.

Findings

First, there is high agreement that the public sector should have an active role and an open attitude to establish relationships with the private and voluntary sectors. This favors the dialogue among brand creators and generates a shared vision. Second, there is an elevated alignment with regards to which roles the public sector should play, independently of experts’ place brand visions. Finally, four aspects derived from the four place brand visions are detected that can favor different final approaches regarding the place brand strategic design.

Research limitations/implications

The study has been performed in Latin America and Spain. Other studies in other areas can complete the previous results.

Originality/value

The results show how experts perceive the desirables behaviors from the public sector, which is a missing topic in place brand literature.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article

Mathieu Dunes and Bernard Pras

This paper aims to analyze the impact of brand management system (BMS) practices on subjective and objective performance in both service- and product-oriented sectors.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the impact of brand management system (BMS) practices on subjective and objective performance in both service- and product-oriented sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a “grounded-in-practice” approach to BMS, a comprehensive formative BMS scale is developed and its validity is assessed. The impact of BMS on subjective brand performance (i.e. predictive validity) and on objective financial performance is assessed. Data are collected from a sample of 298 brand managers and marketing directors in five business sectors (cosmetics, convenience goods, industry, bank/insurance and media) and from a financial database. Path analysis and multigroup analysis are performed to test mediating and moderating effects.

Findings

The results reveal that subjective brand performance (perceived brand performance) mediates the relationship between the BMS and objective financial performance of the firm and on each of the three BMS dimensions; and product-oriented (vs service-oriented) sector positively moderates the relationship between the BMS and subjective brand performance.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers insights into adapting brand management practices along all BMS dimensions to achieve better business performance and improve objective financial performance in product-oriented activities. It highlights the role of brand management implementation, as well as the role of brand management in hierarchical relationships, in improving performance in service activities.

Practical implications

The formative BMS scale offers a tool which can be used to improve strategic decisions and give practical guidance on product vs service sector specificities. The indirect impact of a BMS on financial objective performance reinforces the legitimacy of brand managers and marketing managers.

Originality/value

This paper shows the impact of the BMS on objective financial performance by using a “grounded-in-practice” BMS scale. It also affords explanation on sectoral effects of brand management practices and their consequences on subjective and objective performance.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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