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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the level of satisfaction of secondary housing tourists in Vilcabamba.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis of satisfaction of this tourism segment in a destination is essential for the different economic agents when evaluating various policies. The analysis is based on the answers provided to 16 items in a questionnaire administered to a representative sample (281 respondents). The authors have used the fuzzy logic to reduce ambiguity in the answers associated to subjective views of human beings who express themselves linguistically. A method based on the degree of similarity to ideal solutions has been used to obtain a classification of relevant satisfaction items.

Findings

The results indicate that the ideal solutions segments are represented by multicultural characteristics of second home tourists and the number of years they have been visiting Vilcabamba. The authors find that foreign tourists are more satisfied than Ecuadorians. Analyzing the most critical factors, it is seen that accessibility to the destination, socio-cultural environment and quality of water achieve a high priority.

Research limitations/implications

Second home tourists’ satisfaction has been studied with a limited set of 16 attributes, and some attributes also have a multidimensional nature, so a further study analyzing the scale will be needed in the future.

Originality/value

The present study fills an existing gap in the literature of secondary housing tourism where the existing previous research has been mainly focused on retirees’ secondary housing tourism. The study provides interesting insights into local and national authorities, as well as other economic agents, to designing strategies and planning processes of the destinations for secondary housing tourists.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Book part

A.-M. Nogués-Pedregal

Yet, this is not a book on the tourism industry; nor is it on the changes induced by it, or on how it has been analyzed by social science disciplines, but on the social…

Abstract

Yet, this is not a book on the tourism industry; nor is it on the changes induced by it, or on how it has been analyzed by social science disciplines, but on the social nature of tourism. Together, all the case studies reflect an effort to understand global and mobile dynamics and the production of collective memories and cultural identities in the Mediterranean region through ethnographic examples from different areas (such as Andalusia, Crete, Istria, Costa Blanca, Marseille, Mallorca, Lesvos, and Marrakech). However, this context of global mobilities cannot be understood apart from the constant presence of tourists in the Mediterranean coasts. Tourism has been the driving agent of the essence and orientalizing images of most of Mediterranean territories during the last 100 years (Tzanelli, 2003). Labor immigrants, tourists, and new residents from various nationalities and with different personal motivations converge and share with locals the same locations, and create new places that mushroom all over the territories, be it urbanizations, private beaches, or even detention hotels. Besides, the increasing voting relevance of these new social categories through their participation in local and regional elections is adding value to their role as social agents in the political sphere (Chueca Sancho & Aguelo Navarro, 2009; Janoschka, 2010). The practices and the meanings that give sense to daily life (culture) seem to blur traditional dichotomous notions such as leisure/labor, locals/residents, and nationals/foreigners.

Details

Culture and Society in Tourism Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-683-7

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Book part

Antonio Aledo, Jens Kr. Steen Jacobsen and Leif Selstad

The Spanish region commercially branded as Costa Blanca has long been a popular destination for millions of holidaymakers from both northern Europe and Spain itself …

Abstract

The Spanish region commercially branded as Costa Blanca has long been a popular destination for millions of holidaymakers from both northern Europe and Spain itself (Gaviria Labarta, 1974; Moreno Garrido, 2007). However, from the 1960s onward, these Mediterranean shores have also attracted thousands of people from northern Europe for other purposes, some as more or less permanent residents, and others as seasonal peripatetic visitors, traveling back and forth between their first, second or third homes (Aledo, 2008). In many ways, the increase in second home visits and long-term stays in areas such as Mediterranean Spain parallels well-known developments of seasonal and full-time retirement and other migration in North America to what has been termed the Sunbelt states (Mings & McHugh, 1995). The situation in Europe, however, is more complex, due, for instance, to the crossing of national borders, a variety of spoken languages, and possibly also for greater cultural differences. Certain parts of such flows are related to perceptions of diminishing distances and to the progress of internationalization processes in societies in general, where tourism and other long-distance mobilities are not only an outcome, but also a crucial catalyst.

Details

Culture and Society in Tourism Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-683-7

Content available
Article

Volkan Zoğal, Antoni Domènech and Gözde Emekli

This viewpoint paper aims to provide reflections on the role of second homes in the tourism and housing markets together with future lines of research during and after the…

Abstract

Purpose

This viewpoint paper aims to provide reflections on the role of second homes in the tourism and housing markets together with future lines of research during and after the first outbreak of the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic. The authors aim to review the epistemological evolution of the term “second homes” because of the pandemic, as well as to unfold possible short-, medium- and long-term effects that could place second homes at the center of tourist activity and of the tourist rental market profitability.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on published research studies about the definition of the term “second homes”, as well as media sources related to their role during the current situation of the first outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

In the early stages of the pandemic, second-home owners migrated from crowded cities to low-density areas, being vectors of transmission of the virus. Now, a potential shift in tourist preferences could position second homes at the center of tourist activity as soon as travel restrictions are reduced. This could intensify existing processes of commodification of housing, empowering accommodation platforms and situating the potential for profiteering around the tourist rental market. Parallely, international interests in migrating from crowded cities to low-density areas could also be triggered.

Originality/value

This viewpoint is presented as the confinement measures associated with the new pandemic are being de-escalated in most of the western countries. It is expected that sharing it will provide insights to researchers and practitioners to better plan their research around secondary housing. Its role should be analysed from different perspectives: in the spread of the virus to low-density areas to anticipate mitigation actions in future outbreaks; in the recovery process of (domestic) tourism; in the processes of commodification and financialization of housing in tourist areas; and their impacts on local residents.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

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Article

Milos Nicic and Sanja Iguman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emerging practices of the “tourism of the ordinary” in the wider frame of post-socialist transformation of Serbia’s capital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emerging practices of the “tourism of the ordinary” in the wider frame of post-socialist transformation of Serbia’s capital city – Belgrade. By sourcing the inspiration in cultural studies and classics of the studies of the ordinary, focus is directed to the patterns of tourism consumption of practices, places and people that do not fall in the category of tourism attraction. The attention is drawn to New Belgrade (Novi Beograd in Serbian), residential part of Belgrade built predominantly after the Second World War. New Belgrade lacks proper tourism infrastructure, commoditized attractions and consumerable tourism experiences on a large scale. Nevertheless, this part of the city is slowly becoming explored by tourists individually or in organized walking or cycling tours. Visits to New Belgrade are most often connected to alternative or hip visitors and have the allure of both urban exploration and cultural practice, as the tours are offered by specialist architectural organizations or individual guides. By introspecting the case of New Belgrade, this paper attempts to address the prospect that ordinary exist only in relation to the attraction and that its appeal comes from the fact that what is ordinary to someone is attraction to another.

Design/methodology/approach

As far as specific approach is concerned, some archival and librarian materials have been analyzed in order to map the territory that is being researched (New Belgrade) and to frame the significance of potential heritagisation (Harrison, 2013) on the built environment and its territory. Further, relevant websites and both primary and secondary resources have been consulted. This mostly refers to the websites of Tourist Organization of Belgrade (TOB) and the Institute for the Protection of Cultural Monuments in Belgrade as two most relevant bodies connecting the urban fabric of the city and its tourism valorization.

Findings

In this paper, the authors have tried to demonstrate how tourism of the ordinary might be conducted in urban environment that lacks no tangible resources, whose physical physiognomies are not insignificant and which, in another, alternative tourism regime might be considered attractions. However, in the specific set of characteristics spanning from contested past to ambiguous contemporary valorization, New Belgrade remains an uncharted part of the city for much of the mainstream tourism, leaving its charms for very few visitors, most often engaged in interest of the “ordinary.”

Originality/value

Although Belgrade is experiencing steady rise in numbers regarding tourist arrivals, length of stay and on-site expenditure, New Belgrade is nowhere to be seen on the map of tourism offer, as per Belgrade’s Tourism Organization. TOB’s official web page, at the time this piece is written, in the section Attractions, mentions nothing regarding New Belgrade. Among 13 entries – 12 are historic sites of more than a century behind them and one is a lake and outdoor destination.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article

Cristi Frenţ

This paper aims to show how the effect of vacation home tourism can be quantified within the Tourism Satellite Account (TSA). TSA is a statistical standard recommended by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show how the effect of vacation home tourism can be quantified within the Tourism Satellite Account (TSA). TSA is a statistical standard recommended by international organizations such as UNWTO, Eurostat and OECD, that measures the economic importance of tourism in the same way as the system of national accounts.

Design/methodology/approach

The research focuses on the analysis of a conceptual framework for the statistics of vacation home tourism as it is reflected in the international statistical standards 2008 International Recommendations on Tourism Statistics (IRTS) and Tourism Satellite Account: Recommended Methodological Framework (TSA: RMF). In addition, the analysis is exemplified by some TSA country results referring to vacation homes/second homes. In these illustrative examples calculations are made in a simple manner to show that vacation homes are a component of the main TSA aggregates – internal tourism consumption and tourism value added.

Findings

Computing the share of vacation homes reveals that the figures obtained vary from country to country, providing an index for the “level of economic importance of vacation homes”. However, the level of economic importance of vacation homes depends heavily on the measurements each country decides to include in their TSA in relation to vacation homes and consequently the international comparability of data could be affected.

Research limitations/implications

It was possible to calculate the contribution made by vacation homes to TSA aggregates only in those countries where the figures relating to this aspect of the economy were published/disseminated.

Originality/value

Computing the contribution of vacation homes to the main TSA aggregates produced quantitative results, showing that vacation homes do make a contribution to the tourism economy.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 64 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article

Jumpei Ichinosawa

To provide a theoretical perspective on and an empirical understanding of the decline in Phuket's tourism, the secondary impact of the 2004 tsunami.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a theoretical perspective on and an empirical understanding of the decline in Phuket's tourism, the secondary impact of the 2004 tsunami.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on qualitative field research intermittently conducted between February and July 2005, this paper describes the process and mechanism of this secondary impact (the reputational disaster) in Phuket. The main data sources are semi‐structured interviews with Thai and Japanese workers at hotels, restaurants and tour operating companies.

Findings

In the disaster‐stricken beach resorts of Thailand the effects of the tsunami can be seen as a long‐term socioeconomic phenomenon. The decrease in the number of tourists has brought about serious stagnation in the regional economy. The post‐tsunami tourism decline is a complex process involving risk‐induced stigmatization of the region and historically embedded vulnerabilities in the local society.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not provide quantitative data and analysis. The research should be treated as pilot‐research for further study.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the secondary socioeconomic effects of the tsunami in this tourism‐oriented area. This topic has as yet only been briefly examined. In addition, the concept of “reputational disaster” is introduced so as to expand the perspective of the risk‐induced stigmatization model based on a social amplification of risk framework.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article

Ahmad Salman, Urwashi Kamerkar, Mastura Jaafar and Diana Mohamad

Pandemic like coronavirus (COVID-19) poses a major challenge to countries like Malaysia where tourism is one of the major contributors to the national gross domestic…

Abstract

Purpose

Pandemic like coronavirus (COVID-19) poses a major challenge to countries like Malaysia where tourism is one of the major contributors to the national gross domestic product. Pandemics observed through the years have not only presented a medical challenge but also had a large impact on the psychological well-being of society. Overcoming these challenges required a strategically structured response on the medical and social front. To achieve the said goal on the social front, it is necessary to understand the cognitive appraisal and response of the public during this stressful environment. The restricted movement control used to curb the further spread of the disease drastically hampered tourism in Malaysia. This study aims to follow a statistical analysis based on the cognitive appraisal theory to understand the impact of COVID-19 on the public residing in Penang Island which is one of the most famous tourist destinations in the world.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional, observational study design was carried out for this research. Snowball sampling technique was used and the data was collected via a semi-structured online questionnaire measuring the psychological health of people present in Penang Island.

Findings

The study reports a positive response in terms of disease awareness and proper observation of preventive measures, yet a high level of pandemic induced anxiety was statistically estimated. The study proposes mental health care initiative to help those affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

This study reports a possible link between the mental wellness of the residents and domestic tourism in Penang Island during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article

Shida Irwana Omar, Abdul Ghapar Othman and Badaruddin Mohamed

The purpose of this paper is to examine the tourism life cycle of Langkawi Island, Malaysia. The paper seeks to investigate the stages of life cycle that the island has…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the tourism life cycle of Langkawi Island, Malaysia. The paper seeks to investigate the stages of life cycle that the island has passed through and at what stage the island is in today.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts Butler’s Tourism Area Life Cycle model as the research framework to describe the characteristics of each stage of the island’s tourism life cycle and determine the time scale of the stages. The evidence presented in the stages is derived from secondary sources dating from 1642 to present.

Findings

The findings indicate that the tourism life cycle in Langkawi Island has undergone four stages of development and that it is currently in the consolidation stage. Numerous characteristics suggested by Butler’s model for each stage are clearly discernible in the island’s tourism growth. The government serves as the major player and catalyst for tourism expansion in the island from one stage to the next.

Practical implications

It is hoped that the paper will contribute to a better understanding of how tourism and its market have evolved in Langkawi Island. The paper also provides insights on how future planning should be directed in more sustainable and responsible ways to position the island.

Originality/value

The paper delivers a comprehensive understanding on the tourism developmental process of Langkawi Island, besides facilitating the understanding of major fundamental causes and conditions and the accompanying transition in the stages. The paper also bridges the gaps in knowledge addressed in similar previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article

Daria Elżbieta Jaremen, Elżbieta Nawrocka and Michał Żemła

The purpose of the paper is to identify the state-of-the-art of scientific research on externalities generated in cities by the sharing economy in tourism (SET) based on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to identify the state-of-the-art of scientific research on externalities generated in cities by the sharing economy in tourism (SET) based on an extensive literature review.

Design/methodology/approach

This review detected benefits and costs of the SET in cities development described in the literature using the economic externalities theory approach. The SALSA (Search, AppraisaL, Synthesis and Analysis) research procedure was used to collect relevant academic articles. For findings, the qualitative and quantitative content analysis combined to make a critical analysis of selected papers was conducted.

Findings

Thirty articles devoted to the impact of the SET in cities were identified. Five topics that gained researchers’ attention were recognized: real estate market; transportation; quality of life and gentrification; entrepreneurship and innovativeness of citizens; and local budgets’ incomes. The studies that present externalities of development of the SET in a more complex way are extremely rare.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations are related to the methods used. The subjectivism of the research is a limitation to possibilities to achieve similar results when analyzing the same set of papers by different researchers. The results then are not to be generalized.

Practical implications

The research reveals a list of problems with externalities of the development of the SET in tourism destinations. Those problems are to be solved by policymakers in cities.

Originality/value

This study identified the gaps of previous research on the impacts of the SET on cities’ development. The paper presented an original conceptualization of future research.

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