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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Ayse Bengi Ozcelik, Kaan Varnali and Sebnem Burnaz

Hospitals have become competitive organizations striving to serve the needs of empowered consumers seeking positive experiences. As a result, the patient experience turns…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospitals have become competitive organizations striving to serve the needs of empowered consumers seeking positive experiences. As a result, the patient experience turns into a critical driver of performance for hospitals. Accordingly, the question “what are the critical dimensions for creating a well-designed patient experience?” has been drawing increasing attention from the industry and academia alike. This paper aims to contribute to the understanding of patient experience by using multiple source data obtained from experts and patients.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative research approach to examine the perspectives of both health-care experts and patients about the experience. A semi-structured interview series is conducted with health-care professionals, academicians, researchers, physicians and patients.

Findings

The results suggest a novel framework for the patient experience including five critical dimensions as follows: provider, physician, patient, personnel and periphery. This framework, 5Ps of patient experience, provides a holistic picture, which integrates the perspectives of patients, health-care providers and experts including scholars and researchers.

Practical implications

The 5P framework can be used by health-care professionals to better understand the driving factors of patient experience and to create a strategy to improve patient satisfaction.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the present study is the first qualitative study, which provides a holistic approach to patient experience independent from the branch and considers the perspectives of both health-care experts and patients.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Merve Coskun, Shipra Gupta and Sebnem Burnaz

The purpose of this paper is to understand the effect of store messiness and human crowding on shoppers' competitive behaviours, in-store hoarding and in-store hiding…

1204

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the effect of store messiness and human crowding on shoppers' competitive behaviours, in-store hoarding and in-store hiding, through the mediating effect of perceived scarcity and perceived competition.

Design/methodology/approach

2 (store messiness: messy × tidy) × 2 (human crowding: high × low) between-subject factorial experiment was conducted online to manipulate retail store atmospheric factors. A total of 154 responses were collected through Amazon MTurk. The hypotheses were analysed using ANOVA and PROCESS (Hayes, 2013) procedure.

Findings

Results suggest that store messiness and human crowding within a fast-fashion store lead to perception of scarcity and competition that further affects competitive behaviours. When consumers experience store messiness, they are likely to hide merchandise in store, thus making it inaccessible for other consumers. Further, when they experience human crowding in the store, they feel that the products will be gone immediately so they have a tendency to hoard them.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined the effects of scarcity perception by studying the case of fast-fashion retailers; generalizability needs to be established across different contexts.

Practical implications

Retailers by manipulating human crowding and store messiness can create a perception of scarcity in their stores, thus enhancing sales. However, they should also pay attention to deviant behaviours such as in-store hoarding and in-store hiding as these behaviours may decrease the store sales.

Originality/value

This research contributed to the retailing literature by finding a significant relationship between human crowding, store messiness and competitive behaviours through perceived scarcity and competition.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Selime Sezgin, Nimet Uray and Sebnem Burnaz

The study reported here aims to determine the current status of Turkish clothing exporters in terms of organizational/attitudinal characteristics and marketing mix…

Abstract

The study reported here aims to determine the current status of Turkish clothing exporters in terms of organizational/attitudinal characteristics and marketing mix policies as well as to evaluate the problems, expectations and perceptions related to some situational aspects. Another main aim of this study is to determine the characteristics related to the export performance of the firms exporting to the EU. The results of the study give important insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the Turkish clothing exporters in EU markets. This study also presents findings, which give direction to the policies of the Turkish government, industrial associations and related public institutions for the Turkish textile and clothing industry, the sector of the Turkish economy that is most affected by the Customs Union.

Details

Globalization, the Multinational Firm, and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-056-2

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Ramazan Nacar and Sebnem Burnaz

This study aims to analyse the appropriateness of the information content and organization of multinational companies' (MNCs) web sites for Turkish local cultural values…

2919

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse the appropriateness of the information content and organization of multinational companies' (MNCs) web sites for Turkish local cultural values with the aim of supporting global brand management decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to gather data for the study, 108 MNCs' web sites are analysed by content analysis which is an objective, systematic and quantitative way of conducting information about communication content.

Findings

It is seen from the analyses that foreign multinationals could adapt their web sites' information content to local markets appropriately and sufficiently. However, the face (language) and the way (menu) that these data are presented were not adapted as compared to information content on their web sites.

Research limitations/implications

This study has mainly considered the company side of web sites and neglects the consumer side. Future researchers interested in this area could also investigate how consumers perceive adaptation activities of foreign multinationals through web sites in their countries.

Originality/value

One of the major decisions MNCs face in using web sites regards how to organize and present the web site content to fit local needs and values. Although adaptation becomes a major concern, there is no standard for the multicultural content of web sites. There are several cross‐cultural studies in the literature which compare countries by correlating the analysed variables with Hofstede's scores. Rather than comparing home and host countries of foreign multinationals based on certain dimensions, it is found to be more appropriate to assess on what terms and to what degree these companies could adapt or standardize their global communication channels, namely their web sites, in Turkey.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Sebnem Burnaz and Pinar Bilgin

This paper aims to examine whether companies in business‐to‐business (B2B) markets can leverage their brands extended into business‐to‐consumer (B2C) markets and how…

9469

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether companies in business‐to‐business (B2B) markets can leverage their brands extended into business‐to‐consumer (B2C) markets and how consumers evaluate these extensions.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed by combining Aaker and Keller's brand extension model with theories from B2B branding as well as other consumer branding literature, and analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively to have an insight about how consumers evaluate brand extensions.

Findings

In the context of B2B brand extensions into B2C markets, consumers use brand concept consistency, product‐level relatedness and transferability of skills and resources as major cues to evaluate extensions. Perceived quality, innovativeness and environmental concerns are also relevant cues.

Practical implications

As a consequence of these findings, branding strategies that stretch B2B brands into the domain of consumer markets can be successful in cases where consumers perceive a fit with respect to skills and resources, brand concept, and existing products, and when the parent brand is perceived as being high quality, innovative and environmentally responsible.

Originality/value

The main contribution of the study is to replicate the analysis of brand extension evaluation in a different context, namely B2B brand extension into the B2C market.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Melvin Prince

675

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

337

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Abstract

Details

Globalization, the Multinational Firm, and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-056-2

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