Search results

1 – 10 of 10
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2018

Christian Boris Brunner, Sebastian Ullrich and Mauro Jose De Oliveira

After a negative consumer review (NCR) has been posted on an online shopping site such as Amazon.com, the immediate concern of a brand holder should be to focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

After a negative consumer review (NCR) has been posted on an online shopping site such as Amazon.com, the immediate concern of a brand holder should be to focus on the steps the brand should take to rebuild the unhappy consumers’ trust. The purpose of this paper is to employ the signalling theory to analyse whether a brand response, a customer response or a response that combines both when responding to a NCR leads to better product purchase intentions at the customer end.

Design/methodology/approach

In a laboratory study comprising 351 respondents, six different response scenarios are tested, both for a well-known and an unknown brand. The experiment employs a 6 (response scenario: single brand response, single customer response, brand response and one customer response or vice versa, brand response and three customer responses or vice versa)×2 (customer-based brand equity: strong/weak) between-subject design.

Findings

The findings show that after a NCR, the subjects perceive a customer response as more trustworthy than a response from an unknown brand. However, customer-based brand equity changes the whole story. If a strong brand responds, the purchase intentions of the subjects are similar to those generated by a single customer’s response. In addition, after considering multiple responses, it can be seen that a response combining a brand and a customer response has a higher effect than from a single response. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that perceptions are more favourable if several customer responses are sent in case of an unknown brand.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in the fact that it tries to explore how the consumers perceive multiple responses from different sources after a NCR has been posted. The results highlight that a response that combines a brand and a customer response has a significantly higher effect than what is achieved from a single response. It must also be noted that customer-based brand equity plays a key role.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Christian Boris Brunner, Sebastian Ullrich, Patrik Jungen and Franz-Rudolf Esch

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of symbolic product information (symbolic product design) on consumers’ perceived brand evaluations. In an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of symbolic product information (symbolic product design) on consumers’ perceived brand evaluations. In an experimental setting, the authors consider as key factors the congruence between symbolic product design and product category, the level of product involvement as well as brand strength.

Design/methodology/approach

In an experiment of 490 participants, consumers are confronted to different symbolic product designs connotations. Based on the cognitive process model “SARA” (selective activation, reconstruction and anchoring), the authors examined how symbolic product design associations are used as heuristics in the working memory when making brand judgement.

Findings

The results show that product design associations are used in consumers’ information processing as anchor for brand evaluations. This effect is stronger if symbolic design associations are incongruent to the product category because of consumers’ deeper elaboration process. Furthermore, the impact of symbolic product design is higher for weak compared to strong brands.

Research limitations/implications

This research supports the cognitive process model “SARA” being an appropriate foundation explaining the effects of symbolic product design. Further research should extend this experiment, using a field study in a more realistic setting and/or a choice situation between different alternative product designs at the point of sale. Furthermore, the consumers’ elaboration process should be manipulated differently, e.g. in a mental load condition.

Practical implications

Symbolic product design is important to enhance brand association networks in the consumers’ mind, particularly if the brand is weak. Marketers should use incongruent symbolic product information to differentiate from competitors who use “stereotype” product designs.

Originality/value

Research about product design in the marketing discipline is still limited. The authors analyse the impact of symbolic product design on brand evaluations in an experimental setting of 490 respondents in four product categories. The findings support that consumers use product design as heuristics to evaluate brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Sebastian Ullrich and Christian Boris Brunner

This paper aims to investigate the effects of different response options to a negative consumer review. When consumers buy online, they are often confronted with consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effects of different response options to a negative consumer review. When consumers buy online, they are often confronted with consumer reviews. A negative consumer review on an online shopping website may keep consumers from buying the product. Therefore, negative online consumer reviews are a serious problem for brands.

Design/methodology/approach

In an online experiment of 446 participants, different response options towards a negative consumer review on an online shopping website were examined. The experimental data were analysed with linear regression models using product purchase intentions as the outcome variable.

Findings

The results indicate that a positive customer review counteracts a negative consumer review more effectively than a positive brand response, whereas brand strength moderates this relationship. Including a reference to an independent, trusted source in a brand or a customer response is only a limited strategy for increasing the effectiveness of a response.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research on other product categories and with subjects other than students is suggested to validate the findings. In future research, multiple degrees of the phrasing’s strength of the reference could be used.

Practical implications

Assuming high quality products, brands should encourage their customers to write reviews. Strong brands can also reassure consumers by responding, whereas weak brands cannot.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the online consumer reviews literature with new insights about the role of brand strength and referencing to an independent, trusted source.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Cleopatra Veloutsou and Francisco Guzman

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Francisco Guzman and Ulla Hakala

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Iain L. Densten

This chapter investigated how pre-existing ideas (i.e., prototypes and antiprototypes) and what the eyes fixate on (i.e., eye fixations) influence followers'…

Abstract

This chapter investigated how pre-existing ideas (i.e., prototypes and antiprototypes) and what the eyes fixate on (i.e., eye fixations) influence followers' identification with leaders from another race. A sample of 55 Southeast Asian female participants assessed their ideal leader in terms of prototypes and antiprototype and then viewed a 27-second video of an engaging Caucasian female leader as their eye fixations were tracked. Participants evaluated the videoed leader using the Identity Leadership Inventory, in terms of four leader identities (i.e., prototypicality, advancement, entrepreneurship, and impresarioship). A series of multiregression models identified participants' age as a negative predictor for all the leader identities. At the same time, the antiprototype of masculinity, the prototypes of sensitivity and dynamism, and the duration of fixations on the right eye predicted at least one leader identity. Such findings build on aspects of intercultural communication relating to the evaluation of global leaders.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Rolf van Dick and Sebastian C. Schuh

The purpose of this paper is to extend work on the leader‐follower identity transfer by providing the first empirical evidence for the causal relationship between leader…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend work on the leader‐follower identity transfer by providing the first empirical evidence for the causal relationship between leader and follower organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed causal relationship between leader and follower organizational identification (OI) was tested in a scenario study and in a laboratory experiment. Additionally, in the laboratory experiment the impact of leader OI on follower performance was examined.

Findings

The results suggest that highly identified leaders positively influence their followers' attitudes and performance by affecting their self‐concept, i.e. increasing their OI.

Practical implications

Improving leader OI provides a promising way for organizations to increase their employees' OI and performance.

Originality/value

The paper provides the first empirical evidence for the proposed causal relationship between leader and follower OI, with implications for individual and organizational effectiveness.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Steven P. MacGregor, Joseba Arana, Igor Parra and Ma. Pilar Lorenzo

Within the Mondragón Valley – an industrial heartland in the Basque Country, in the North of Spain – there has been a growing need for a practical model of the new product…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the Mondragón Valley – an industrial heartland in the Basque Country, in the North of Spain – there has been a growing need for a practical model of the new product development (NPD) process which fulfils a variety of needs, notably the integration of strategy and technology considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a review of the state of the art in the NPD field, focusing on the use and limitations of both established and newer models for guiding product development. This is combined with the experiences of managing real NPD projects for companies in the Mondragón Corporación Cooperativa over the past several years.

Findings

The paper presents the Ikerlan new product creation (NPC) model, designed primarily in response to area needs, which attempts to combine the most useful aspects of existing NPD models.

Research limitations/implications

In the first instance, the model is created for use by companies in the Mondragón Valley – therefore it may not be possible to generalise findings, yet the paper may be instructive in showcasing the real industrial innovation needs of a European region. The model evolved from several notable works in the NPD community which may address these limitations in part.

Practical implications

The model may be used as a basic guide for aspects including NPD outsourcing, idea generation and, ultimately, reducing time to market. This is specifically tailored to companies in the Mondragón Valley. However, depending on the operating context certain aspects may be transferable to other European areas.

Originality/value

The paper details the industrial context, introducing the Mondragón cooperative – the largest industrial cooperative in the world with over 100 companies in seven industrial sectors – the academic context, discussing state of the art in NPD processes and models, and concludes with short industrial cases which show the potential use of the developed model. As such, insight is presented into a European area with a tradition of innovation, together with some of the challenges it faces in the years ahead. A new NPD model, combining the most useful aspects of existing models may also be of use to certain members of the academic and industrial communities.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Xiaohui Shi, Feng Li and Pattarin Chumnumpan

As a frequently observed business phenomenon, the use of product scarcity to improve a product’s market performance has received increasing attention from both academics…

Abstract

Purpose

As a frequently observed business phenomenon, the use of product scarcity to improve a product’s market performance has received increasing attention from both academics and practitioners. The resulting literature has covered a wide variety of issues based on various theories, using different research methods, in a diverse range of settings. However, this diversity also makes it difficult to grasp the core themes and findings, and to see the outstanding knowledge gaps. This paper aims to review previous studies on the use of product scarcity in marketing and identifies new directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was conducted to identify and analyse 66 research papers published in business and management journals between 1970 and 2017.

Findings

The authors examined the underlying theories of scarcity-based marketing, and developed a conceptual framework that describes the key factors of product scarcity and how they influence both consumers and the market. They also highlighted some key achievements in modelling the processes involved in using product scarcity in marketing.

Originality/value

This analysis of the identified papers suggests that there are substantial gaps in our knowledge of this field, which opens up new paths for future research. For future research, the authors identified three directions aimed at: addressing the practical needs of firms in understanding product scarcity; guiding the implementation of scarcity-based strategies; and measuring, monitoring and predicting the level of product scarcity and its impacts during implementation.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2019

Humberto A. Brea-Solís and Emili Grifell-Tatjé

The purpose of this paper is to understand how a major retailer like Kmart lost its dominant position in the American retail industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how a major retailer like Kmart lost its dominant position in the American retail industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper contains a decomposition of profit change into meaningful economic drivers using a methodology that combines frontier analysis with index number theory. The empirical analysis is complemented with a description of Kmart’s business model produced from corporate documents and other sources.

Findings

A quantification of Kmart’s business model performance expressed in monetary terms. This assessment is presented by CEO tenures showing the contribution of different economic drivers to the evolution of profits.

Practical implications

The study’s empirical results highlight the importance of the correct implementation of all aspects of the business model in order to achieve success.

Originality/value

This paper presents a new empirical framework to assess business model performance. Despite Kmart’s important role in American discount retailing history there have been very few studies that have analyzed its downfall. This paper contributes by filling that gap.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of 10