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Abstract

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Sebastian Fuchs

The purpose of this study is threefold: to better understand what predicts individuals pro‐change behavior (PCB) and anti‐change behavior (ACB) during organizational…

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4669

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is threefold: to better understand what predicts individuals pro‐change behavior (PCB) and anti‐change behavior (ACB) during organizational renewal with respect to organizational justice perceptions, given its significance for change intervention success; to identify and empirically test two new foci of organizational identification, namely manager and top management identification (TMID); and to investigate how these two new identification foci affect the relationship between various types of organizational justice and change‐oriented behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 137 market research employees on their perceptions of organizational distributive, procedural and interactional justice, manager and TMID and PCB and ACB were collected. Multiple hierarchical regression analysis was used for testing direct relationships between organizational justice and change‐oriented behavior and moderation effects of manager and TMID on these relationships.

Findings

The findings indicate that all types of justice predict PCB and that, in addition, interactional justice perceptions are negatively related to employees' ACB. Neither manager nor TMID had a moderating effect on the relationship between organizational justice and PCB, but both moderated the relationship between distributive justice perceptions and ACB. Moreover, identification with top management moderated the relationship between procedural justice perceptions and ACB.

Research limitations/implications

The use of self‐reported measures on PCB and ACB may present a too optimistic reflection of people's actual behavior during organizational change based on social desirability considerations in organizational research.

Practical implications

The findings contribute to a better understanding of how organizations and change agents can foster PCB and what role a psychological bond of employees with managers and an organization's top management can play during change interventions. Specifically, organizational leaders should seek both some professional and personal credentials in order to tap into the positive self‐concept element of identification and also adopt a leadership style during change which is associated with charismatic leadership behaviors. Scholars in the areas of organizational behavior and I/O psychology benefit from this study as it sheds light on the antecedents of PCB and ACB and offers two new identification foci that interact with the variables at hand.

Originality/value

The creation of manager and TMID as new foci in organizational identification research and their use as a moderating force on the relationship between both PCB and ACB is unprecedented.

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Jesús M. Valdaliso, Edurne Magro, Mikel Navarro, Mari Jose Aranguren and James R. Wilson

– The purpose of this paper is to apply the path dependence theoretical framework to STI policies that support research and innovation strategies for smart specialisation (RIS3).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the path dependence theoretical framework to STI policies that support research and innovation strategies for smart specialisation (RIS3).

Design/methodology/approach

Review of the recent literature on the phases, sources of reinforcement and change mechanisms (layering, conversion, recombination, etc.) present in path-dependent processes, as well as the role played by mental frameworks, political agents and power relations; and its illustration and testing over 30 years of STI policy development in the Basque Country.

Findings

How to operationalise the analysis of continuity and change of STI policies supporting RIS3 policies characterised by path dependence processes. Likewise, learnings from the analysis of Basque case regarding the types of challenges that European regions will face as they design their RIS3, according to their degree of maturity in STI policies.

Originality/value

It is the first time that the recently developed tools for analysis of path-dependent processes are applied to the development of STI policies supporting RIS3 policies.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Sandra Maria Correia Loureiro, Tatjana Gorgus and Hans Ruediger Kaufmann

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the antecedents and outcomes of online consumer brand engagement (OCBE). In addition, a mediator effect of satisfaction and…

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3201

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the antecedents and outcomes of online consumer brand engagement (OCBE). In addition, a mediator effect of satisfaction and brand love in the relationship between OCBE and positive electronic word-of-mouth (e-WOM) is analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a panel sampling with 201 participants from the millennial generation provided by the software tool Qualtrics. The online questionnaire is composed of two screening questions, the items of the constructs and a section with the socio-demographic variables.

Findings

Involvement and online brand experience (OBE) are important drivers of online brand engagement. Brand love is a significant mediator between online brand engagement and e-WOM.

Originality/value

Studies about antecedents and outcomes of online consumer engagement are rare. This paper contributes to the fledgling online consumer engagement literature by analyzing three antecedents: involvement, OBE, and self-brand image congruency. For the first time, brand love and satisfaction were considered as direct outcomes of online brand engagement. New insights are provided into the mediating role of brand love between online brand engagement and e-WOM.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Christian Fuchs and Daniel Trottier

This paper aims to present results of a study that focused on the question of how computer and data experts think about Internet and social media surveillance after Edward…

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2067

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present results of a study that focused on the question of how computer and data experts think about Internet and social media surveillance after Edward Snowden’s revelations about the existence of mass-surveillance systems of the Internet such as Prism, XKeyscore and Tempora. Computer and data experts’ views are of particular relevance because they are confronted day by day with questions about the processing of personal data, privacy and data protection.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two focus groups with a total of ten experts based in London. As London is considered by some as the surveillance capital of the world, and has a thriving Internet industry, it provided a well-suited context.

Findings

The focus group discussions featured three topics that are of crucial importance for understanding Internet and social media surveillance: the political economy surveillance in general; surveillance in the context of the Snowden revelations; and the question what the best political reactions are to the existence of a surveillance-industrial complex that results in political and economic control of the Internet and social media. The focus groups provided indications that computer and data experts are pre-eminently informed on how Internet surveillance works, are capable of critically assessing its implications for society and have ideas about on what should be done politically.

Originality/value

Studies of privacy and surveillance after Edward Snowden’s revelations have taken on a new dimension: Large-scale covert surveillance is conducted in a collaborative endeavour of secret services, private communications corporations and security companies. It has become evident that a surveillance-industrial Internet surveillance complex exists, in which capitalist communications and security corporations and state institutions collaborate.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Ander Garcia, Maria Teresa Linaza, Aitor Gutierrez and Endika Garcia

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to present gamified mobile experiences as valid tools for DMOs to enrich the experience of tourists, and to present the benefits…

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1278

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to present gamified mobile experiences as valid tools for DMOs to enrich the experience of tourists, and to present the benefits provided to DMOs by analytics tools integrated on gamified mobile experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Staff from three DMOs have generated a gamified mobile experience using a custom authoring tool designed and developed to fulfil their requirements. This gamified experience has targeted families with children visiting Basque Country during off-peak season. The experience has been validated over a period of seven weeks within a pilot project promoted by the local tourist information offices of the DMOs. Data directly provided by tourists and data gathered from analytic tools integrated on the gamified mobile experience have been analysed to fulfil the research objectives presented on the paper.

Findings

Both DMOs and tourists can benefit from gamified mobile experiences. The integration of analytics tools to gain insights into the behaviour of tourists can be a relevant information source for DMOs.

Research limitations/implications

The pilot project has targeted a niche tourism market, families with children visiting Basque Country, and has been running during off-peak season. Further studies focusing on other tourist types and different tourism season and destination types will be required to strengthen the validation of the research objectives presented on this paper.

Practical implications

The paper promotes both the development of gamified mobile experiences and the inclusion of analytics tools for DMOs to obtain relevant information about tourists and the mobile experiences.

Originality/value

A gamified mobile experience is generated by DMOs, validated on the basis of experience of real tourists. The analytics tools inside the gamified mobile experience provide DMOs with relevant information.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Sofia Reino, Andrew J. Frew and Nicole Mitsche

This paper aims to provide a framework for benchmarking the eTourism capability of a destination’s tourism industry, understanding the eTourism capability of a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a framework for benchmarking the eTourism capability of a destination’s tourism industry, understanding the eTourism capability of a destination’s industry as the contribution that the information and communication technologies (ICT) uptake of that industry makes to its own performance. The impact of ICT in tourism has been suggested through extensive research. Previous work has urged the development of wide-angle studies to enable benchmarking of destinations and their industries. However, relevant research is limited. Macro-level studies in the area tend to focus on a single aspect of technology to evaluate adoption, are not sector-specific nor take into consideration the different levels of contribution that systems may bring to performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature on tourism, eTourism, benchmarking and technology adoption provided the baseline for developing this benchmarking tool.

Findings

The literature supported the selection of key tourism industry sectors, i.e. accommodation establishments, visitor attractions and food and beverage; the most suitable methodology, i.e. intermediary performance measures; and the business characteristics that need being taken into consideration when assessing ICT adoption by tourism businesses, e.g. size, type of establishment and area of location.

Research limitations/implications

The framework has not been tested yet. It is based on a review of the literature and needs to be validated through primary research. The framework was developed based on the context of Scotland. Further work should be done to adjust the framework to other destinations worldwide.

Practical implications

The framework enables destinations to benchmark the eTourism capability of their industries.

Originality/value

It provides a comprehensive framework for benchmarking tourism destinations’ industries, which takes into consideration elements of technology adoption, the characteristics of the tourism industry and the particularities of the different ICT elements.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Abstract

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Comics, Games and Transmedia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-108-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Sebastian Knebel, Mario D. Schultz and Peter Seele

This paper aims to outline how destructive communication exemplified by ransomware cyberattacks destroys the process of organization, causes a “state of exception,” and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline how destructive communication exemplified by ransomware cyberattacks destroys the process of organization, causes a “state of exception,” and thus constitutes organization. The authors build on Agamben's state of exception and translate it into communicative constitution of organization (CCO) theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A significant increase of cyberattacks have impacted organizations in recent times and laid organizations under siege. This conceptual research builds on illustrative cases chosen by positive deviance case selection (PDCS) of ransomware attacks.

Findings

CCO theory focuses mainly on ordering characteristics of communication. The authors aim to complement this view with a perspective on destructive communication that destroys the process of organization. Based on illustrative cases, the authors conceptualize a process model of destructive CCO.

Practical implications

The authors expand thoughts about a digital “corporate immune system” to question current offensive cybersecurity strategies of deterrence and promote resilience approaches instead.

Originality/value

Informed by destructive communication of cyberattacks, this theory advancement supports arguments to include notions of disorder into CCO theory. Furthermore, the paper explains where disruptions like cyberattacks may trigger sensemaking and change to preserve stability. Finally, a novel definition of ‘destructive CCO’ is provided: Destructive Communication Constitutes Organization by disrupting and destroying its site and surface while triggering sensemaking and becoming part of sensemaking itself.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Nathan Hulsey

Abstract

Details

Games in Everyday Life: For Play
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-937-8

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