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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Maggie Leese and Sean Russell

The issue of mental health and policing is a subject that has been debated from a number of different perspectives. The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings…

Abstract

Purpose

The issue of mental health and policing is a subject that has been debated from a number of different perspectives. The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of a case study that explored mental health difficulties and vulnerability within police custody.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the study was qualitative, and it utilised telephone, semi-structured interviews with all levels of the custody staff. This approach was taken because the aim of the study was to explore how people in different roles within the organisation worked to safeguard vulnerable people in custody.

Findings

The findings from this study identified a number of interesting themes that could be explored further in later studies. Overall, the respondents expressed frustration that vulnerable people find themselves in police custody for low-level crime, when it could have been avoided with improved mental health services in the community. Additionally, the findings demonstrated that despite the processes that are designed to safeguard the detainee, tensions still exist including, timely access to mental health assessments, appropriate training and support for staff and the use of appropriate adults.

Research limitations/implications

Although the study was small in scale, the custody facility delivered detainee facilities for about 5,000 individuals per year. The research and information obtained supported the police lead for mental health to identify opportunities for improving the customer journey, as well as recognising the need for further research to identify how officers and staff relate to vulnerable individuals in contact with the police service.

Originality/value

Despite the limitations of the study, the findings have captured interesting data from a range of professionals working in one police custody suite, and therefore it presents a holistic overview of some key issues around mental health, vulnerability and safeguarding within the context of police custody.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2008

Vickie Cox Edmondson

The aim of this paper is to explore the entry and success of hip‐hop entrepreneurs in the music industry and identify the competitive reactions of well‐established firms…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the entry and success of hip‐hop entrepreneurs in the music industry and identify the competitive reactions of well‐established firms within the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used anecdotal data and popular press coverage to trace the evolution of the hip‐hop music industry in the USA and discuss aspects of the marketing strategies of key players in the industry. Additionally, the strategic response of dominant firms to their success within the industry is explored.

Findings

Hip‐hop music and its ensuing culture is now a well‐established industry that has enormous marketing power. Although few championed their efforts in the beginning, the contributions of Black American entrepreneurs to the music industry is becoming increasingly recognized by existing firms within the industry and beyond. The failure of major record companies to capitalize on the hip‐hop phenomenon resulted in the creation of new ventures and a new industry. While one could argue that very few key Black American entrepreneurs remain in the industry, the impact and influence of these entrepreneurs and those that have been recruited by major labels suggests that the hip‐hop entrepreneurs should not be ignored.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on the development of the hip‐hop music industry, which could be of value to aspiring Black American entrepreneurs and marketing managers of companies in other industries that target young urban customers as well as companies that are interested in forming partnerships with Black American entrepreneurs.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Nnamdi O. Madichie

This paper seeks to highlight hip‐hop's contribution to the entrepreneurship and place marketing literature. Hip‐hop is taken from the lens of an individual artist, Akon…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to highlight hip‐hop's contribution to the entrepreneurship and place marketing literature. Hip‐hop is taken from the lens of an individual artist, Akon, whose music and lyrics – a “hybrid of silky, West African‐styled vocals mixed with North America's East Coast and Southern beats” – provides fresh insights for place marketers.

Design/methodology/approach

A “discourse analysis” of the lyrics from two non‐chart songs Senegal and Mama Africa provided the conceptual base for a better understanding of the fusion of music and entrepreneurship with place marketing.

Findings

Through music, Akon has bridged socio‐cultural (ethnic cuisine, immigration and social exclusion, faith or spirituality) and economic attributes (notably remittances) – with implications for entrepreneurship and place marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates that music and entrepreneurship can be extended to place marketing using discourse analysis. Future research may need to consider how to leverage the potential of celebrity endorsement or partnerships in place marketing strategies. It was by no accident that Akon was recruited by PepsiCo for the recently concluded 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa through a charity single – Oh Africa!

Originality/value

The paper is an attempt to fuse three distinct streams of literature (music, entrepreneurship and place marketing). The value lies in extrapolating a well‐known, but little discussed, subject in academia, i.e. the role of hip‐hop music in the place marketing discourse.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

B.G. Dale and J. Lees

What constitutes a success, survivor, or failure regarding UK quality circle programmes, is not a clear‐cut issue, according to results from four questionnaire‐based…

Abstract

What constitutes a success, survivor, or failure regarding UK quality circle programmes, is not a clear‐cut issue, according to results from four questionnaire‐based surveys carried out by the Department of Management Sciences at UMIST, 1982–4. It is an open question whether some quality circles have a limited life‐span and should be allowed to die off naturally when appropriate; circle activity often appears to resume once labour conditions have stabilised. The success of individual circles seems to depend greatly on how well their members work and integrate together, and how well the circle philosophy has been evolved to fit the company's style. A circle will only work as part of a policy of worker involvement and open management and if it is coupled with a specific long‐term company‐wide commitment to quality.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Bridget Penhale and Margaret Flynn

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Russell Sacks, Jennifer Morton, Jenny Jordan, Steven Blau and Sean Kelly

In April 2017, FINRA issued a regulatory notice addressing the use of social media and digital communications by broker-dealers. The notice expanded on previous FINRA…

Abstract

Purpose

In April 2017, FINRA issued a regulatory notice addressing the use of social media and digital communications by broker-dealers. The notice expanded on previous FINRA guidance on these topics. This article provides clarity regarding how social media and digital communications fit within the requirements of various FINRA rules and provides guidance to firms and their registered representatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The principal topics addressed by FINRA’s regulatory notice are: (a) text messaging, (b) personal versus business communications, (c) third-party content and hyperlinks, (d) native advertising, (e) testimonials and endorsements and (f) links to BrokerCheck. This article presents an overview of each of these topics, respectively.

Findings

Under recordkeeping requirements, firms must ensure that they are able to retain communications made through text messaging and chat services. Business communications, which relate to the products or services of the firm, are subject to filing and content requirements, while personal communications are not. Under certain circumstances, third-party posts on social media sites established by the member and testimonials may be attributable to the firm. Native advertising, while permissible, must comply with content requirements. Firm-created electronic applications do not have to provide a link to BrokerCheck.

Originality/value

Firms and their registered representatives will gain a better understanding of what is permissible pursuant to FINRA and SEC rules as they communicate digitally and via social media.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Jennifer Morton, Russell Sacks, Jenny Ding Jordan, Steven Blau, P. Sean Kelly, Taylor Pugliese, Andrew Lewis and Caitlin Hutchinson Maddox

This article provides a resource for traders and other market participants by providing an overview of certain automatic circuit breaker mechanisms and discretionary…

Abstract

Purpose

This article provides a resource for traders and other market participants by providing an overview of certain automatic circuit breaker mechanisms and discretionary powers that the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) and the U.S. president, as applicable, can exercise to pause or stop the trading of individual securities or trading activities across exchanges during extreme market volatility, each of which can cause interruptions to trading activity.

Design/methodology/approach

This article surveys automatic and discretionary mechanisms to halt trading activity under extreme market conditions. In particular, the article examines automatic cross-market circuit breakers, limit up-limit down pauses, the alternative uptick rule, as well as discretionary authority to stop short selling of particular securities and to stop trading across exchanges.

Findings

The article concludes that market participants must be cognizant not only of automatic cross-market circuit breakers, but also several other forms of potential market disruptions that may occur due to increased market volatility during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

Originality/value

By exploring various mechanisms that respond to market disruption, this article provides a valuable resource for traders and other market participants looking to identify and respond to potential interruptions to their trading activity.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Sean Lee and Ian Phau

This study aims to empirically examine young tourists’ perceptions of object-based authenticity, existential authenticity and perceived value perceptions on satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically examine young tourists’ perceptions of object-based authenticity, existential authenticity and perceived value perceptions on satisfaction. Data were collected from young heritage tourists at the Little India heritage precinct in Singapore.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected via a pen and paper questionnaire at Little India in Singapore. Young tourists below 30 years of age were identified to complete the questionnaire. A total of 288 sets of valid responses were collected to perform statistical analysis to test the relationships between the key constructs in the research model.

Findings

The results of the study reaffirmed the application of the perceived value framework to authenticity. Object-based authenticity, existential authenticity and perceived monetary value yielded significant and positive effects on overall perceived value and, subsequently, satisfaction. Further, overall perceived value was found to mediate the relationships between object-based authenticity, existential authenticity and perceived monetary with satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides researchers with a better understanding of authenticity and value perceptions of young tourists. It also lends further support for the integration of object-based and existential authenticity into the multidimensional approach to perceived value.

Practical implications

The results help destination marketers and policymakers better understand this important segment to develop more effective and sustainable marketing and management strategies.

Originality/value

This study addresses the lack of research in the literature on young tourists who will shape the tourism landscape of the future. It also further assesses the propriety of integrating authenticity measures into the measurement of perceived value.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Dee Duffy

Purpose – To explore how young men negotiate the matriarchal domain of fashion consumption and self-presentation, observing techniques adopted by these men to navigate…

Abstract

Purpose – To explore how young men negotiate the matriarchal domain of fashion consumption and self-presentation, observing techniques adopted by these men to navigate this feminized space and construct their identity project.

Methodology/approach – Engaging Foucauldian theory, a constructionist approach is followed to analyze qualitative interview data with the understanding that a consumer's narrated experience is embedded in a social web of possible interpretation. Rather than seeking to discover a respondents “essential self” within interview data, this research takes a narrative analysis approach, considering individuals storytelling within the context of circulating discourses and power relations.

Findings – As young, fashion-forward men navigate new configurations of power relationships and adopt new modes of performing masculinity, they come to legitimate themselves by forging new categories of existence. They engage various techniques to include the arts and the art of irony in an effort to constitute their masculine subjectivity within discourses of fashionable self-presentation practices.

Social implications – By exploring the social context wherein consumer choices are made, we see consumer identity projects are in fact constricted and influenced by a myriad of sociocultural forces.

Originality/value of paper – Within consumer culture theory, there is much focus on the agency of consumers and their identity projects. However, there is a dearth of work that considers the social and cultural context wherein these identity constructions take place. This study makes a contribution toward addressing this gap.

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Sean D. Darling and J. Barton Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to identify unique values and competencies linked to private and public sector environments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify unique values and competencies linked to private and public sector environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on critical incident interviews with a sample of senior leaders who had experience in both the public and private sectors.

Findings

The findings illustrate distinct public and private sector relevant competencies that reflect the unique values of their organizations and the character of the organization’s environments. This paper suggests a range of distinct public sector competencies including: managing competing interests, managing the political environment, communicating in a political environment, interpersonal motivational skills, adding value for clients, and impact assessment in decision-making. These were very different than those identified as critical for the private sector environment: business acumen, visionary leadership, marketing communication, market acumen, interpersonal communication, client service, and timely and opportunistic decision-making. Private sector competencies reflect private sector environments where goals need to be specifically defined and implemented in a timely manner related to making a profit and surviving in a competitive environment. Public sector competencies are driven by environments exhibiting more complex and unresolvable problems and the need to respond to conflicting publics and serving the public good while surviving in a political environment.

Originality/value

A key message of this study is that competency frameworks need to be connected to the organization’s unique environments and the values that managers are seeking to achieve. This is particularly important for public organizations that have more complex and changing environments.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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