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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Nik Thompson, Atif Ahmad and Sean Maynard

It is a widely held belief that users make a rational cost-benefit decision when choosing whether to disclose information online. Yet, in the privacy context, the evidence…

Abstract

Purpose

It is a widely held belief that users make a rational cost-benefit decision when choosing whether to disclose information online. Yet, in the privacy context, the evidence is far from conclusive suggesting that strong and as-yet unmeasured influences on behaviour may exist. This paper aims to demonstrate one such link – the effect of internet addiction on information disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 216 Web users was collected regarding their perceptions on privacy and information disclosure intentions as well as avoidance behaviour, an element of internet addiction. Using a research model based on the Privacy Calculus theory, structural equation modelling was applied to quantify the determinants of online disclosure under various conditions.

Findings

The authors show that not all aspects of privacy (a multi-dimensional construct) influence information disclosure. While concerns about data collection influence self-disclosure behaviour, the level of awareness about privacy does not. They next examine the impact of internet addiction on these relationships, finding that internet addiction weakens the influence of privacy concerns to the point of non-significance.

Originality/value

The authors highlight some of the influences of self-disclosure behaviour, showing that some but not all aspects of privacy are influential. They also demonstrate that there are powerful influences on user behaviour that have not been accounted for in prior work; internet addiction is one of these factors. This provides some of the first evidence of the potentially deleterious effect of internet addiction on the privacy calculus.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Atif Ahmad and Sean Maynard

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, design, delivery and evaluation of a postgraduate information security subject that focuses on a managerial…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development, design, delivery and evaluation of a postgraduate information security subject that focuses on a managerial, rather than the more frequently reported technical perspective. The authors aimed to create an atmosphere of intellectual excitement and discovery so that students felt empowered by new ideas, tools and techniques and realized the potential value of what they were learning in the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops fundamental principles and arguments that inform the design and development of the teaching curriculum. The curriculum is aimed at security management professionals in general and consultants in particular. The paper explains the teaching method in detail including the specific topics of lectures, representative reading material, assessment tasks and feedback mechanisms. Finally, lessons learned by the authors and their conclusions are presented as a form of reflection.

Findings

The instructors recognized four key factors that played a role in the atmosphere of intellectual excitement and motivation. These were new concepts and ideas, an increased level of engagement, opportunities for students to make their own discoveries and knowledge presented in a practical context. Maintaining a high quality of teaching resources, catering for diverse student needs and incorporating learning cycles of assessment in a short period of time were additional challenges.

Originality/value

Most “information security” curricula described in research literature take a technology-oriented perspective. This paper presents a much-needed management point of view. The teaching curriculum (including assessment tasks) and experiences will be useful to existing and future teaching and research academics in “information security management”. Those interested in developing their own teaching material will benefit from the discussion on potential topic areas, choice of assessment tasks and selection of recommended reading material.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Adrian Munteanu

This study aims to argue that in the case of quantitative security risk assessment, individuals do not estimate probabilities as a likelihood measure of event occurrence.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to argue that in the case of quantitative security risk assessment, individuals do not estimate probabilities as a likelihood measure of event occurrence.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the most commonly used quantitative assessment approach, the annualized loss expectancy (ALE), to support the three research hypotheses.

Findings

The estimated probabilities used in quantitative models are subjective.

Research limitations/implications

The ALE model used in security risk assessment, although it is presented in the literature as quantitative, is, in fact, qualitative being influenced by bias.

Practical implications

The study provides a factual basis showing that quantitative assessment is neither realistic nor practical to the real world.

Originality/value

A model that cannot be tested experimentally is not a scientific model. In fact, the probability used in ISRM is an empirical probability or estimator of a probability because it estimates probabilities from experience and observation.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

W. Sean Cleary and Jun Wang

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of institutional investors’ investment horizons (IIIH) on a wide variety of key corporate policies.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of institutional investors’ investment horizons (IIIH) on a wide variety of key corporate policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors perform regression analysis to a panel data set of quarterly financial statement data for US firms over the 1981-2014 using several measures of IIIH.

Findings

The authors argue that an increase in the presence of long-term investors contributes to more effective monitoring and information quality. This results in a reduction in agency costs and informational asymmetry problems for firms that are more heavily influenced by long-term investors, which in turn influences the corporate policies they pursue. Consistent with these arguments, the evidence suggests that firms with a greater long-term institutional investor base maintain lower investment outlays, higher dividend payments, lower levels of cash and higher levels of leverage. All results hold after controlling for potential endogeneity issues.

Originality/value

The authors show that a greater presence of long-term institutional investors leads to higher dividends, lower investment outlays, lower cash holdings and higher leverage. The comprehensive nature of the predictions with respect to overall corporate finance policies and the supporting evidence provided represents an important contribution, as previous studies have tended to focus on one specific area of corporate behavior (i.e. such as cash holdings).

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Peter Robbins

In his inauguration speech of 1961, John F. Kennedy, the first Catholic and youngest-ever holder of the office of US President, famously exhorted citizens to ‘Ask not what…

Abstract

In his inauguration speech of 1961, John F. Kennedy, the first Catholic and youngest-ever holder of the office of US President, famously exhorted citizens to ‘Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.’ At the time, few would have interpreted this as a call for open innovation or even citizen crowdsourcing: neither the language nor the architecture then existed for either. But the sentiment he expressed marked the beginning of a campaign of citizen engagement in developing ideas for government. It was, in effect, the first national exhortation for the crowdsourcing of ideas, and Kennedy’s words have subsequently been adapted by Jeff Howe for the modern crowdsourcing context.

Citizen crowdsourcing is now well-established. This chapter sets out to assess how successful it has been as a mechanism for finessing original and meaningful ideas that advance social goals. We look briefly at leading examples of crowdsourcing for social good. We also look at the underlying factors that support it, including the knowledge and input solicited from the crowd; the crowd’s willingness to participate; and the mechanisms through which the crowd can engage. We trace the idea and practice of crowdsourcing back to Socrates in ancient Athens. We look at prosocial behaviour, exploring selected annals of public intellectuals, including Emerson. We examine citizen science as a forerunner of crowdsourcing, then move into the business strategy of open innovation and, finally, we arrive at crowdsourcing for social good in various guises. In conclusion, we explore what has been learned from initiatives that can now be considered current best practice in this area.

Details

Exploring the Culture of Open Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-789-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2006

Robert Baker

Karl Marx could only pen the memorable line, “the history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles” because he was heir to the sanitary and…

Abstract

Karl Marx could only pen the memorable line, “the history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles” because he was heir to the sanitary and public health reforms of the nineteenth century (Marx [1848] 1972, p. 335). The Black Death, which had wiped out much of fourteenth-century Florence and which had regularly decimated sixteenth- and seventeenth-century London, was now but a faint memory. Yet had a historian of some earlier period of European history thought to pen a line as presumptuous as Marx's, it might have read: “the history of all hitherto existing society is the history of struggle with plague or pestilence.” Epidemics and pandemics have haunted human societies from their beginnings. The congregation of large masses of humans in urban settings, in fact, made the evolution of human infectious disease microorganisms biologically possible (McNeill, 1976; Porter, 1997, pp. 22–25). Epidemics have been as determinative of the course of economic, social, military and political history as any other single factor – emptying cities, decimating armies, wiping out generations and destroying civilizations.

Details

Ethics and Epidemics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-412-6

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

David Butler, Robert Butler, Justin Doran and Sean O’Connor

Growing evidence suggests regional economic factors impact on individual outcomes, such as life expectancy and well-being. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

Growing evidence suggests regional economic factors impact on individual outcomes, such as life expectancy and well-being. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact that player-specific and regional differences have on the number of senior international appearances football players accumulate over the course of their careers, for six UEFA member countries, from 1993 to 2014.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a Poisson regression model to analyse the impact of individual and regional factors on the number of senior international caps a footballer receives over the course of their career.

Findings

The results indicate that both individual and regional variables can explain the number of caps a player receives over the course of their career. The authors find that an individual’s career length positively influences the number of international caps accrued. Players born in wealthier and more populous regions accumulate a greater number of international appearances. Distance from the capital has no effect, however, the number of youth academies in the player’s region of birth has a significant positive effect.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is limited to regional variations within economically developed states. It would be interesting to test whether the correlation between relative regional development and international success exists in less developed countries. The authors only address mens international football in this study and cannot comment on the generality of the findings across genders or sports.

Practical implications

The results can provide insights for local football authorities and policy makers concerned with regional characteristics and those interested in the development of elite talent.

Originality/value

This is the first study to analyse a pan-European data set, using an increasingly adopted econometric method to understanding regional economic development – Poisson modelling.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1967

DURING some comments on the brain drain last month it was remarked that work study technologists stood on the periphery. Suddenly they have been moved right to the centre…

Abstract

DURING some comments on the brain drain last month it was remarked that work study technologists stood on the periphery. Suddenly they have been moved right to the centre as the result of a communication from Dr. Robert N. Lehrer. He is among the six American work study experts best known to the profession in this country, ranking with Barnes and Mundel as having contributed much to a right appreciation of the subject's value and its techniques.

Details

Work Study, vol. 16 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

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Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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