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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2017

James L. Anderson, Frank Asche, Taryn Garlock and Jingjie Chu

Aquaculture has become the world’s fastest growing food-production technology. This chapter outlines the main factors for this growth and shows how farmed seafood can…

Abstract

Aquaculture has become the world’s fastest growing food-production technology. This chapter outlines the main factors for this growth and shows how farmed seafood can contribute directly and indirectly to food security. We used the databases of the FAO on food production and trade to analyze the development of production in the main categories of animal protein. The trends were interpreted in a productivity growth and trade context. We found that modern aquaculture is enabled by transferring knowledge from terrestrial animal production and from developing new technologies to create substantial productivity growth and production cost reductions. The current growth rate of aquaculture production exceeds all other types of meat production and is expected to continue to increase as the agro-science industry expands (seafood made up 34.5% of the world’s animal production in 2013). More than 90% of the world’s aquaculture production takes place in developing countries, where it contributes to food security directly through consumption or indirectly as a source of income. Seafood is a main source of animal protein in many parts of the world, particularly in developing countries. Depending on species and country, farmed seafood contributes to food security directly through domestic consumption, or indirectly through economic growth from exports.

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World Agricultural Resources and Food Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-515-3

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Barbara Steele and Ann Feyerherm

This chapter explores the evolution of a network, initially based on providing sustainable seafood through Loblaw’s supply chain, to a network that is collectively working…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the evolution of a network, initially based on providing sustainable seafood through Loblaw’s supply chain, to a network that is collectively working to improve ocean health. It describes the role of the CEO and key managers, the internal changes taken by Loblaw to become a more sustainable organization, and the external partnering that resulted in a more coherent network with shared goals.

Design

The chapter describes models and theories of sustainable organizations, issue nets, and collaboration and then applies the concepts to understand Loblaw’s sustainability journey and the creation of a network.

Findings

The model of the evolution to a sustainable organization is extended to include the journey to sustainable issue or domain networks. What Loblaw and the partnering organizations were able to create suggests that there are increasing levels of collaboration around changing a domain, if there is the courage to take a leap of faith and increase an organization’s time horizon beyond immediate financial demands.

Originality and value

The findings of this chapter will help senior executives with responsibility for shifting supply chains to become more sustainable. In addition, this case provides a new level of detail in describing the journey to sustainability, shifting from a company focus to an issue focus.

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Building Networks and Partnerships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-886-0

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Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2011

Morten H. Abrahamsen

The study here examines how business actors adapt to changes in networks by analyzing their perceptions or their network pictures. The study is exploratory or iterative in…

Abstract

The study here examines how business actors adapt to changes in networks by analyzing their perceptions or their network pictures. The study is exploratory or iterative in the sense that revisions occur to the research question, method, theory, and context as an integral part of the research process.

Changes within networks receive less research attention, although considerable research exists on explaining business network structures in different research traditions. This study analyzes changes in networks in terms of the industrial network approach. This approach sees networks as connected relationships between actors, where interdependent companies interact based on their sensemaking of their relevant network environment. The study develops a concept of network change as well as an operationalization for comparing perceptions of change, where the study introduces a template model of dottograms to systematically analyze differences in perceptions. The study then applies the model to analyze findings from a case study of Norwegian/Japanese seafood distribution, and the chapter provides a rich description of a complex system facing considerable pressure to change. In-depth personal interviews and cognitive mapping techniques are the main research tools applied, in addition to tracer studies and personal observation.

The dottogram method represents a valuable contribution to case study research as it enables systematic within-case and across-case analyses. A further theoretical contribution of the study is the suggestion that network change is about actors seeking to change their network position to gain access to resources. Thereby, the study also implies a close relationship between the concepts network position and the network change that has not been discussed within the network approach in great detail.

Another major contribution of the study is the analysis of the role that network pictures play in actors' efforts to change their network position. The study develops seven propositions in an attempt to describe the role of network pictures in network change. So far, the relevant literature discusses network pictures mainly as a theoretical concept. Finally, the chapter concludes with important implications for management practice.

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Interfirm Networks: Theory, Strategy, and Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-024-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2020

Pravina Jeevanaraj, Aliah Ahmad Foat, Halimah Tholib and Nurul Izzah Ahmad

Malaysians are the highest seafood consumers in the region; be it fresh or processed. Environmental pollution has put the safety of seafood at stake, heavy metals among…

Abstract

Purpose

Malaysians are the highest seafood consumers in the region; be it fresh or processed. Environmental pollution has put the safety of seafood at stake, heavy metals among others. This study was done to assess the health risk associated with selected heavy metals ingestion from processed seafood.

Design/methodology/approach

The most preferred processed seafood type and the intake rates were determined from a cross-sectional survey among communities in Shah Alam, Selangor (n = 90). The processed seafood were then purchased from local traders (n = 81), underwent homogenization, acid digestion (0.5 g) in Multiwave 3,000 and heavy metal quantitation (Hg, Pb, Cd, As) using ICP-MS. Estimated weekly ingestion (EWI), hazard quotient (HQ), hazard index (HI), lifetime cancer risk (LCR), and target risk (TR) were used to estimate the risk associated with processed seafood consumption.

Findings

Arsenic was the highest metal detected, acetes topping the list (10.05 ± 0.02 mg/kg). Mercury was detected at significantly higher level in salted fourfinger threadfin (0.88 ± 0.09 mg/kg) while Pb and Cd in toli shad (2.67 ± 0.16 mg/kg; 0.32 ± 0.22 mg/kg). Non-cancer risk was estimated for consumption of dried/salted food types with hazard index (HI) anchoives (5.2) > salted fourfinger threadfin (1.8) > toli shad (1.7). Besides, an unacceptable cancer risk was estimated for all food types for continuous consumption (Total risk (TR) > 10–4), except the dried acetes.

Research limitations/implications

This study implies that although the concentration of most heavy metals were well below the permitted value, significant amount of risk present for consumption of several species. In addition, for selected heavy metals such as Hg and As, speciation analysis followed by risk assessment would provide a clearer picture.

Practical implications

There is a need to refer back to the local permissible level of heavy metals in processed seafood and formulate safe consumption guide.

Social implications

The food types are advised to be consumed with caution especially by the sensitive group.

Originality/value

This study estimated the risk of cancer and other non-cancer disease from processed seafood consumption among Malaysian women.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Anders Wien, Siril Alm and Themistoklis Altintzoglou

The purpose of this study was to explore whether consumers' confidence in cooking skills related to seafood differed across genders, and if such difference could be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore whether consumers' confidence in cooking skills related to seafood differed across genders, and if such difference could be explained by the identity-relevance of seafood cooking for men.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data was collected from a balanced sample of 515 Norwegian consumers.

Findings

The results showed that men (versus women) with high confidence in their seafood cooking skills have a lower preference for convenient seafood solutions, indicating that these men may be more reluctant to use food products that could hinder the cooking outcome being attributed to their cooking skills.

Originality/value

This study adds nuance to the understanding of male consumers as highly reliant on convenience products when cooking. More specifically, this study provides novel insight into how men function differently than women in relation to preparing seafood, suggesting that some men resist using convenient seafood solutions in order to express an identity as skillful in the kitchen.

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British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2018

Khawaja Muhammad Imran Bashir, Jin-Soo Kim, Md Mohibbullah, Jae Hak Sohn and Jae-Suk Choi

This study aims to investigate the current and future status of overseas halal food marketing and develops strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the current and future status of overseas halal food marketing and develops strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the global halal food market.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a case study approach and a semi-structured review of previously published data. Evidence collected from literature reviews, supported by research studies, anecdotal proof, personal reflection and experience is also used. It also considers the perspectives of various stakeholder groups in the global halal food supply chain.

Findings

The global halal food market is forecasted to reach US$1.914tn in 2021. At present, Korea holds a small share of this market. To enter the emerging Islamic market, there is a need to develop strategies. This study recommends the following main strategies to improve the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the halal food market: reduce mistrust by improving halal authentication and certification standards; understand consumer behavior and develop marketing strategies according to the respective country’s socioeconomic and geographic status; train industry employees and develop competitive halal seafood products; exploit the rising global influence of Hanryu; establish a halal logistics/supply chain and halal industrial parks; and promote digital marketing and tourism. Moreover, the government should also subsidize halal seafood development, as well as provide export and international trade insurances.

Originality/value

As the Muslim population continues to grow, the importance of global halal food marketing also increases. Therefore, strategies for improving the competitiveness of Korean seafood companies in the global halal food market need to be taken into account.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Siril Alm and Svein Ottar Olsen

This paper aims to enhance the understanding of the influence of increased food availability and social learning in kindergartens on children’s attitudes toward food. In…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enhance the understanding of the influence of increased food availability and social learning in kindergartens on children’s attitudes toward food. In addition, it discusses questions regarding children and their parent’s attitudes and seafood consumption at home.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a qualitative approach that includes semi-structured interviews with 24 Norwegian children aged four to six years, interviewed in pairs. They represented two public kindergartens. One group attended a seafood intervention and the other did not. The intervention comprised seafood served as lunch twice per week, in addition to various educational activities designed to increase children’s knowledge of seafood.

Findings

Children who attended the seafood intervention used more cognitive associations by describing seafood as being healthy. They also expressed more positive attitudes towards seafood compared with the other children. The findings indicate a stronger socialization effect from parents than preschool teachers.

Research limitations/implications

The children proved to have limited cognitive and communicative abilities for participation in semi-structured interviews. Future studies should consider older samples and/or methods that are more adapted to their cognitive abilities. Results cannot be generalized due to the relative small sample size and the fact that the study was performed in one culture.

Social implications

To promote a healthier diet, children’s care givers and school authorities should make seafood more available. Preschool teachers should be encouraged to eat meals with the children to function as positive role models.

Originality/value

The study addresses a currently under-researched issue concerning the influence of kindergartens on children’s food attitudes toward a specific food category.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Steve Williams

A startegic management approach is used to assess the nature of business environments affecting seafood distribution in Japan. Notions of environment ‘textures’ described…

Abstract

A startegic management approach is used to assess the nature of business environments affecting seafood distribution in Japan. Notions of environment ‘textures’ described in an influential paper by Emery and Trist are used to determine the current degree of environmental turbulence and the implications for export strategies. The environment as a whole is found to exhibit ‘medium turbulence’, and the sectors of importing, wholesaling, and food retailing/service are ‘medium’ to ‘high’ turbulence'. To cope with such environments, firms must undertake extensive real‐time market research (e.g. using POS information accessed via computer); develop flexible structures and operating systems (to become more responsive); and focus on improving communication and meeting the changing customer needs.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2015

Pirjo Honkanen and James A. Young

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of determinants of consumers’ buying intentions for sustainable seafood.

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1734

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of determinants of consumers’ buying intentions for sustainable seafood.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 755 representative respondents in the UK were collected. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the data. The theory of planned behaviour was used as a framework for the analysis, with an additional variable, personal norm, which seems to be especially relevant for environmental behaviour.

Findings

The results confirmed the expected relationships: the motivation to buy sustainable seafood is increased by a positive attitude towards buying sustainable seafood, perceived pressure from important others such as family, friends and colleagues, and by a strong moral obligation. Attitude towards buying sustainable seafood was the strongest predictor of intention found in the study. To reach a goal of consumers placing greater emphasis upon purchasing more sustainable seafood, both attitudinal and normative messages could be used. Further implications of the findings and the scope for further research are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

The study is correlational in nature, thus limiting the causal inferences that can be made from the results. It does, however, help to explain the relationships in explored in the model.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the issue of motivation to buy sustainable seafood which has not received much attention in literature, but is an important issue for anyone trying to increase consumer sustainable behaviour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Dawn Birch, Meredith Lawley and Denise Hamblin

This paper aims to explore the drivers and barriers to seafood consumption in Australia and to investigate attitudes toward pre‐packaged fresh chilled seafood products.

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2444

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the drivers and barriers to seafood consumption in Australia and to investigate attitudes toward pre‐packaged fresh chilled seafood products.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐stage study of seafood consumption in Australia was conducted comprising ten focus groups across six states (n=60) and a national online consumer survey (n=1,815).

Findings

The main drivers for seafood consumption in Australia are health, taste, convenience, and a desire for diet variety. The main barriers to seafood consumption are price, concerns regarding origin, concerns about freshness, difficulty in evaluating seafood quality, and not liking the taste or texture of fish. The main appeals of pre‐packaged fresh chilled seafood products are convenience and ease of preparation, while barriers include price and concerns about origin and freshness.

Research limitations/implications

The survey focussed on the main or joint grocery buyers in households and thus may not be representative of the entire Australian population.

Practical implications

The findings provide important insights for the Australian seafood industry in developing and delivering seafood offerings that will appeal to Australian consumers and thus stimulate seafood consumption. This knowledge will also assist the Australian Government and health educators to more effectively campaign to encourage increased seafood consumption.

Originality/value

While research on antecedents to seafood consumption in Europe has been extensive, research into the drivers and barriers to seafood consumption in Western countries such as Australia and strategies for increasing seafood consumption is less evident.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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