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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Mary M. Snow and Richard K. Snow

This paper aims to discuss rising sea levels at the global, regional, and community scale and illustrate the necessity for public comprehension and involvement. It also…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss rising sea levels at the global, regional, and community scale and illustrate the necessity for public comprehension and involvement. It also aims to demonstrate geographic information systems (GIS) as an efficient tool for modeling and disseminating information with the expectation that coastal communities will benefit by joining in a process to integrate this knowledge into broad‐based decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

GIS is capable of creating, analyzing, and displaying sea level rise scenarios enabling local officials to address the negative effects of elevated sea levels by allowing them to identify both built and biotic communities that are at risk, assess the situation, and develop mitigation strategies. The paper makes use of a case study of Daytona Beach, Florida, to examine the impacts of storm surge.

Findings

A GIS model, produced for south Florida integrating land use and elevation data to illustrate locations that lie below five feet, reveals that heavily populated urban areas in Miami‐Dade County could be inundated during extreme high tide and storm surge events. The GIS also indicates that much of the Florida Keys has elevations below five feet and is at risk of flooding if sea levels rise at projected rates.

Originality/value

The case study of Daytona Beach, Florida, can be replicated at other coastal locations by using GIS to assimilate spatial data and generate meaningful graphic models to be interpreted by those responsible for minimizing the risks from rising sea levels.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Shital V. Lodhia

The purpose of this paper is to assess the risk due to climate induced disasters in coastal regions. Coastal areas, being economically attractive and ecologically fragile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the risk due to climate induced disasters in coastal regions. Coastal areas, being economically attractive and ecologically fragile, need altogether different development approaches. The paper also explores the applicability of stakeholder theory for managing coastal regions in a sustainable manner. This paper should help policymakers when making their decisions to maintain coastal regions’ prosperity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an exploratory study using secondary information available at various levels. This paper presents the case study of the coastal region of Gujarat. It starts by evaluating the present status of the coastal resources and their degradation. It then assesses the risk due to climate induced coastal hazards. It has critically reviewed the policy response towards coastal issues and problems. The applicability of stakeholder approach had been tested for coastal management.

Findings

The paper has identified that in an absence of stakeholder approach, the current planning strategies have failed to deal with coastal issues and problems. The coastal region needs a special attention for sustaining its development. An integrated regional framework for coastal development is required which encompasses trade‐off among various sectors. The region needs a long‐term regional land use planning, which can facilitate the disaster resilience and adaptation strategies for local communities. Finally adopting a stakeholder approach is recommended, to improve the ecological productivity and biodiversity of the coastal region.

Research limitations/implications

The research has important policy implications for the state of Gujarat and infers that the stakeholder approach is the most appropriate approach for planning the development of the coastal region.

Practical implications

The paper has direct policy implications for the government of Gujarat and Government of India. Coastal planning needs a systematic approach to have an integrated development. The use of stakeholder approach can solve many issues and problems of coastal conflicts. Such an approach is very important for the protection and sustainable development of the coastal region. This also has colossal relevance for any developing countries preparing coastal region development plans.

Social implications

The suggestions incorporated in the paper have also looked into the consideration of environmental conservation and protection of rights to livelihood for marginalized groups such as fishing communities.

Originality/value

The use of stakeholder theory for public sector planning is a new approach in a research. The paper has delved into the requirement of stakeholder approach in coastal planning for developing the coastal economy and conserving the coastal environment.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

D.Y.S. Mah

This paper aims to present a hydrodynamic river modelling by incorporating river flow and sealevel rise interactions.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a hydrodynamic river modelling by incorporating river flow and sealevel rise interactions.

Design/methodology/approach

Predicted sea levels from renowned studies are put to test on flow scenarios of the Sarawak River in the deltaic city of Kuching, Malaysia. Three cases are drawn for investigation, including one extreme flood event, one normal flow with low tide, and another normal flow with spring tide.

Findings

The model predicts a worst case that nearly 5‐6 km2 of urban land along the Lower Sarawak River would be under water due to the rise.

Practical implications

Such an indication would draw a clearer picture for strategy and mitigation planning.

Originality/value

Generally sea level estimation involves ocean‐atmospheric modelling. However, the paper argues here that a river model is credible for practical hydrological site‐specific analysis to include increase of sea levels.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Susan Jacobson, Juliet Pinto, Robert E. Gutsche and Allan Wilson

Residents of South Florida have been living with the effects of climate change in the form of flooding due, in part, to sea level rise, for more than a decade. However…

Abstract

Residents of South Florida have been living with the effects of climate change in the form of flooding due, in part, to sea level rise, for more than a decade. However, previous research has characterized news coverage of climate change impacts as concerning distant events in terms of time and place. In this study, we look at coverage of climate change at The Miami Herald from 2011-2015, a time period significant in terms of increased temperatures and flooding levels on city streets. Through a content analysis of 167 articles, this study argues that news coverage of climate change in The Miami Herald was largely pragmatic, linked to a news peg, locally focused and presented via opinion pieces rather than news articles. Furthermore, Miami Herald coverage links distant hypotheses of climate change with local realities, invokes a network of editorial responses, and emphasizes local impacts, particularly in more affluent areas. Findings from this study contribute to understanding how news coverage of climate change as a local story may provide a useful model for engaging the public in adapting to and mitigating against the impact of climate change, and creating social acceptance of climate change policy.

Details

Climate Change, Media & Culture: Critical Issues in Global Environmental Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-968-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Clare Allender, Monty Sutrisna and Atiq Uz Zaman

This study aims to support the development risk management strategies towards improving the resilience of assets located in the estuary and lower level of the Swan River…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to support the development risk management strategies towards improving the resilience of assets located in the estuary and lower level of the Swan River, Western Australia. The study evaluated the key role of Federal/State policies in adaptation planning and the communication and interface between various stakeholders, including State/Local governments, construction professionals, property developers and landowners.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applied a mixed research approach through a questionnaire survey followed by an in-depth interview involving local construction experts. Collected data were analysed following the grounded theory methodology style of data analysis.

Findings

The findings revealed a convoluted understanding of communication networks and responsibility for owning the future risks between relevant stakeholders. As a result, a framework illustrating clear process and roles in mitigating risk and implementing adaptive asset management measures has been formulated and presented in this study.

Originality/value

Scientific evidence suggested that sea-level rise and increased frequency of major coastal flooding events are inevitable as early as 2100, and having a comprehensive risk management plan of assets to anticipate climate risks and to improve urban resilience is essential. The proposed framework is aimed at local stakeholders in improving current state of communication and adaptation planning as a pathway to develop a robust risk management strategy.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Clem Tisdell

The purpose of this paper is to outline the cause of global warming, its trends and consequences as indicated by the International Panel on Climate Change. Sealevel rise

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the cause of global warming, its trends and consequences as indicated by the International Panel on Climate Change. Sealevel rise is one consequence of particular concern to Pacific Island states. It also reviews the views of economists about connections between economic growth and global warming.

Design/methodology/approach

International efforts, such as through the Kyoto protocol, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and their atmospheric concentration are discussed and prospects for post‐Kyoto policies are considered. Ways are also examined of addressing the consequences of global warming for the Pacific Island states. How they will be affected and to what extent is discussed, together with their ability to cope with the emerging problem.

Findings

The paper finds that whereas the majority of economists did not foresee a conflict between economic growth and global warming, the possibility of such a conflict is now more widely recognized following the Stern Report. It is predicted that a significant reduction in global greenhouse gas emissions is unlikely to be achieved in the foreseeable future owing to conflicting national interest (a prisoners' dilemma problem) and because is will take time to develop new technologies which will reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, payment for greenhouse gas emissions (for example, via tradable permits) will accelerate desirable technological advance. Both international political action and efforts to develop and use technologies that lower greenhouse gas emissions need to be pursued. Given current and likely increases in greenhouse gas emissions, continuing global warming in this century (and beyond) appears to be inevitable and consequently Pacific Island states will be adversely affected by sealevel rise and climate change.

Originality/value

The paper emphasizes that Pacific Island states will suffer great hardship from global warming but are ill‐placed geographically, financially and administratively to prevent or adjust to the possible environmental disasters that await them. Nothing may save some from eventual environmental annihilation.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Jerry D. Mahlman

In 2001, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Third Assessment Report revealed an important increase in the level of consensus concerning the reality of…

Abstract

In 2001, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Third Assessment Report revealed an important increase in the level of consensus concerning the reality of human-caused climate warming. The scientific basis for global warming has thus been sufficiently established to enable meaningful planning of appropriate policy responses to address global warming. As a result, the world's policy makers, governments, industries, energy producers/planners, and individuals from many other walks of life have increased their attention toward finding acceptable solutions to the challenge of global warming. This laudable increase in worldwide attention to this global-scale challenge has not, however, led to a heightened optimism that the required substantial reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions deemed necessary to stabilize the global climate can be achieved anytime soon. This fact is due in large part to several fundamental aspects of the climate system that interact to ensure that climate change is a phenomenon that will emerge over extensive timescales.

Although most of the warming observed during the 20th century is attributed to increased greenhouse gas concentrations, because of the high heat capacity of the world's oceans, further warming will lag added greenhouse gas concentrations by decades to centuries. Thus, today's enhanced atmospheric CO2 concentrations have already “wired in” a certain amount of future warming in the climate system, independent of human actions. Furthermore, as atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase, the world's natural CO2 “sinks” will begin to saturate, diminishing their ability to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. Future warming will also eventually cause melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, which will contribute substantially to sea level rise, but only over hundreds to thousands of years. As a result, current generations have, in effect, decided to make future generations pay most of the direct and indirect costs of this major global problem. The longer the delay in reducing CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions, the greater the burden of climate change will be for future life on earth.

Collectively, these phenomena comprise a “global warming dilemma.” On the one hand, the current level of global warming to date appears to be comparatively benign, about 0.6°C. This seemingly small warming to date has thus hardly been sufficient to spur the world to pursue aggressive CO2 emissions reduction policies. On the other hand, the decision to delay global emissions reductions in the absence of a current crisis is essentially a commitment to accept large levels of climate warming and sea level rise for many centuries. This dilemma is a difficult obstacle for policy makers to overcome, although better education of policy makers regarding the long-term consequences of climate change may assist in policy development.

The policy challenge is further exacerbated by factors that lie outside the realm of science. There are a host of values conflicts that conspire to prevent meaningful preventative actions on the global scale. These values conflicts are deeply rooted in our very globally diverse lifestyles and our national, cultural, religious, political, economic, environmental, and personal belief systems. This vast diversity of values and priorities inevitably leads to equally diverse opinions on who or what should pay for preventing or experiencing climate change, how much they should pay, when, and in what form. Ultimately, the challenge to all is to determine the extent to which we will be able to contribute to limiting the magnitude of this problem so as to preserve the quality of life for many future generations of life on earth.

Details

Perspectives on Climate Change: Science, Economics, Politics, Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-271-9

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Edward Hanna and Richard J. Hall

Global temperature has risen by 1°C since 1900, while since the 1990s the Arctic has recently experienced an accelerated warming of about double the average rate of global…

Abstract

Global temperature has risen by 1°C since 1900, while since the 1990s the Arctic has recently experienced an accelerated warming of about double the average rate of global warming. Nearly all climate scientists agree that the main cause of this temperature rise is ever-increasing accumulations of ‘greenhouse gases’, especially carbon dioxide and methane, within our atmosphere. Sea level rise could easily exceed one metre this century under ‘business as usual’. However, global warming is not just about rising temperatures, melting ice and rising sea levels, but it also affects the frequency and severity of many extreme weather events. Planetary warming is not a uniform process, can spring surprises in regional climate change and is probably linked with the tendency for Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes to have more extreme (variously hot/cold/dry/wet) weather, especially during the recent period of rapid Arctic warming. There is overwhelming scientific evidence that human activity through enhanced greenhouse gas emissions is largely responsible for recent climate change and accompanying extreme weather, and we are already clearly seeing these changes. However, it is equally evident that, although initial remedial steps are being taken, finding an adequate solution will not be easy unless much larger changes are made to the way in which we all live. Limiting global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial temperatures would require global carbon dioxide emissions to decrease by approximately 40–60% by 2030 relative to 2010 levels. This can only be achieved through a collective solution that fully involves diverse communities, among them religious stakeholders.

Details

Science, Faith and the Climate Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-987-1

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Huong Thi Lan Huynh, Lieu Nguyen Thi and Nguyen Dinh Hoang

This study aims to evaluate the impact of climate change on some specific areas of agricultural production in Quang Nam Province, including assessing the possibility of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the impact of climate change on some specific areas of agricultural production in Quang Nam Province, including assessing the possibility of losing agricultural land owing to sea level rise; assessing the impact on rice productivity; and, assessing the impact on crop water demand.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the method of collecting and processing statistics data; method of analysis, comparison and evaluation; method of geographic information system; method of using mathematical model; and method of professional solution, to assess the impacts of climate change.

Findings

Evaluation results in Quang Nam Province show that, by the end of the 21st century, winter–spring rice productivity may decrease by 33%, while summer–autumn rice productivity may decrease by 49%. Under representative concentration pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario, water demand increases by 31.1% compared to the baseline period, of which the winter–spring crop increases by 28.4%, and the summer–autumn crop increased by 34.3%. Under RCP 8.5 scenario, water demand increases by 54.1% compared to the baseline period, of which the winter–spring crop increases by 46.7%, and the summer–autumn crop increased by 63.1%. The area of agricultural land likely to be inundated by sea level rise at 50 cm is 418.32 ha, and at 80 cm, it is 637.07 ha.

Originality/value

To propose adaptation solution to avoid the impacts of climate change on agriculture, it is necessary to consider about the impact on losing land for agriculture, the impact on rice productivity, assess the impact on crop water demand and other. The result of this assessment is useful for policymakers for forming the agriculture development plan.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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