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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Sara Mannheimer, Scott W.H. Young and Doralyn Rossmann

In this paper, faculty librarians at an academic institution explore the ethical dimensions of conducting research with user-generated social networking service (SNS) data. In an…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, faculty librarians at an academic institution explore the ethical dimensions of conducting research with user-generated social networking service (SNS) data. In an effort to guide librarian-researchers, this paper first offers a background discussion of privacy ethics across disciplines and then proposes a library-specific ethical framework for conducting SNS research.

Design/methodology/approach

By surveying the literature in other disciplines, three key considerations are identified that can inform ethical practice in the field of library science: context, expectation, and value analysis. For each of these considerations, the framework is tailored to consider ethical issues, as they relate to libraries and our practice as librarian-researchers.

Findings

The unique role of the librarian-researcher demands an ethical framework specific to that practice. The findings of this paper propose such a framework.

Practical implications

Librarian-researchers are at a unique point in our history. In exploring SNSs as a source of data to conduct research and improve services, we become challenged by conflicting and equally cherished values of patron privacy and information access. By evaluating research according to context, expectations, and value, this framework provides an ethical path forward for research using SNS data.

Originality/value

As of this paper’s publication, there is no existing ethical framework for conducting SNS research in libraries. The proposed framework is informed both by library values and by broader research values, and therefore provides unique guidelines for the librarian-researcher.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Patrick O’Brien, Scott W.H. Young, Kenning Arlitsch and Karl Benedict

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which HTTPS encryption and Google Analytics services have been implemented on academic library websites, and discuss the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which HTTPS encryption and Google Analytics services have been implemented on academic library websites, and discuss the privacy implications of free services that introduce web tracking of users.

Design/methodology/approach

The home pages of 279 academic libraries were analyzed for the presence of HTTPS, Google Analytics services and privacy-protection features.

Findings

Results indicate that HTTPS implementation on library websites is not widespread, and many libraries continue to offer non-secured connections without an automatically enforced redirect to a secure connection. Furthermore, a large majority of library websites included in the study have implemented Google Analytics and/or Google Tag Manager, yet only very few connect securely to Google via HTTPS or have implemented Google Analytics IP anonymization.

Practical implications

Librarians are encouraged to increase awareness of this issue and take concerted and coherent action across five interrelated areas: implementing secure web protocols (HTTPS), user education, privacy policies, informed consent and risk/benefit analyses.

Originality/value

Third-party tracking of users is prevalent across the web, and yet few studies demonstrate its extent and consequences for academic library websites.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 42 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Doralyn Rossmann and Scott W.H. Young

Social Media Optimization (SMO) offers guidelines by which libraries can design content for social shareability through social networking services (SNSs). The purpose of this…

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Abstract

Purpose

Social Media Optimization (SMO) offers guidelines by which libraries can design content for social shareability through social networking services (SNSs). The purpose of this paper is to introduce SMO and discuss its effects and benefits for libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers identified and applied five principles of SMO. Web analytics software provides data on web site traffic and user engagement before and after the application of SMO.

Findings

By intentionally applying a program of SMO, the library increased content shareability, increased user engagement, and built community.

Research limitations/implications

Increasing use of SNSs may influence the study results, independent of SMO application. Limitations inherent to web analytics software may affect results. Further study could expand analysis beyond web analytics to include comments on SNS posts, SNS shares from library pages, and a qualitative analysis of user behaviors and attitudes regarding library web content and SNSs.

Practical implications

This research offers an intentional approach for libraries to optimize their online resources sharing through SNSs.

Originality/value

Previous research has examined the role of community building and social connectedness for SNS users, but none have discussed using SMO to encourage user engagement and interactivity through increased SNS traffic into library web pages.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2024

Noel Scott, Brent Moyle, Ana Cláudia Campos, Liubov Skavronskaya and Biqiang Liu

Abstract

Details

Cognitive Psychology and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-579-0

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Term. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Marion Johnson and Scott Weich

Young men of African‐Caribbean origin are over‐represented in mental health services (MHSs), often entering these services by coercive routes, such as under the Mental Health Act…

Abstract

Young men of African‐Caribbean origin are over‐represented in mental health services (MHSs), often entering these services by coercive routes, such as under the Mental Health Act or via the criminal justice system. This pilot study focused on patients' narratives of their journey from first contact with primary care services. Our principal aim was to describe and compare early experiences of help‐seeking for serious mental health problems among young men of white and black ethnicity.In‐depth interviews were conducted (using a topic guide) with black and white men aged 18‐30 years old and who were accessing secondary care mental health services for the first time for a psychotic illness. Participants were recruited from the early intervention services serving inner‐city Birmingham. Seven participants were interviewed, and 12 themes were identified from transcripts. Six of these individuals had consulted their GP prior to accessing the early intervention service. Only one attendee received medication at initial consultation, and none were referred to specialist mental health services. Participants described the manner in which family or friends interceded on their behalf to advocate for and secure specialist help ‐ either by accompanying them to see their GP, contacting mental health services directly or taking them to the local accident and emergency department. The latter route was accessed by black but not white participants. Three out of four black participants and one out of three white participants were subsequently admitted to hospital. None of the participants were particularly satisfied with their experience of primary care. Communication was less than ideal, and participants were able to reflect on their own failure to disclose critical information to their doctor. By contrast, all participants confided in family or in their trusted friends that they were becoming aware that they were experiencing mental distress.Our findings confirm the difficulties faced by GPs and those who consult them in the early stages of first onset psychotic episodes, and the importance of having family or friends who are able to advocate on other people's behalf at times of crisis. Despite the advent of universal early intervention services across the UK, those most in need may still not be receiving the help that they need in the timeliest manner.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Morgan R. Clevenger and Cynthia J. MacGregor

Abstract

Details

Business and Corporation Engagement with Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-656-1

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1903

IT is evident from the numerous press cuttings which are reaching us, that we are once more afflicted with one of those periodical visitations of antagonism to Public Libraries…

Abstract

IT is evident from the numerous press cuttings which are reaching us, that we are once more afflicted with one of those periodical visitations of antagonism to Public Libraries, which occasionally assume epidemic form as the result of a succession of library opening ceremonies, or a rush of Carnegie gifts. Let a new library building be opened, or an old one celebrate its jubilee, or let Lord Avebury regale us with his statistics of crime‐diminution and Public Libraries, and immediately we have the same old, never‐ending flood of articles, papers and speeches to prove that Public Libraries are not what their original promoters intended, and that they simply exist for the purpose of circulating American “Penny Bloods.” We have had this same chorus, with variations, at regular intervals during the past twenty years, and it is amazing to find old‐established newspapers, and gentlemen of wide reading and knowledge, treating the theme as a novelty. One of the latest gladiators to enter the arena against Public Libraries, is Mr. J. Churton Collins, who contributes a forcible and able article, on “Free Libraries, their Functions and Opportunities,” to the Nineteenth Century for June, 1903. Were we not assured by its benevolent tone that Mr. Collins seeks only the betterment of Public Libraries, we should be very much disposed to resent some of the conclusions at which he has arrived, by accepting erroneous and misleading information. As a matter of fact, we heartily endorse most of Mr. Collins' ideas, though on very different grounds, and feel delighted to find in him an able exponent of what we have striven for five years to establish, namely, that Public Libraries will never be improved till they are better financed and better staffed.

Details

New Library World, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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