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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Lukas P. Forbes, Scott W. Kelley and K. Douglas Hoffman

The authors propose focusing on e‐commerce service failure and recovery through the presentation of failure and recovery strategies employed by e‐commerce service firms.

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8019

Abstract

Purpose

The authors propose focusing on e‐commerce service failure and recovery through the presentation of failure and recovery strategies employed by e‐commerce service firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ the critical incident technique using 377 customer responses to present ten e‐tail failures and 11 e‐tail recovery strategies used by e‐commerce service firms. The authors also present data on post‐recovery satisfaction levels and propensity to switch behavior.

Findings

Findings indicate that: e‐tail customers experience different types of service failure relative to traditional retail settings; e‐tail firms employ a different series of recovery strategies relative to traditional retail settings; and post‐recovery switching by e‐tail customers can be high even with satisfying experiences.

Originality/value

This paper strengthens the existing failure and recovery literature by presenting data on the largest growing sector of the service industry. These findings will have value to traditional firms looking to expand to e‐commerce channels in addition to e‐commerce firms currently experiencing customer dissatisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Scott W. Kelley

The purpose of this paper is to provide a retrospective evaluation of the findings first put forward in the article Efficiency in Service Delivery: Technological or…

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1648

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a retrospective evaluation of the findings first put forward in the article Efficiency in Service Delivery: Technological or Humanistic Approaches?, and to offer directions for further research and developments in the research area.

Design/methodology/approach

Research directions which emanated from the publication of the article have been examined in the light of current service(s) marketing theory and practice. As a result, promising current and future strands of research have been identified.

Findings

The original article examined technological and humanistic approaches to improving service delivery efficiency. In doing so, it included two services classification schemes which provided context for the managerial implications presented. The original article was published in 1989. Much has changed since then, especially with regard to technological approaches to service delivery. However, the implications included in the original article for the most part hold. Future researchers are offered a variety of possible directions to pursue in light of the changes, especially in technology, that have occurred since the publication of the original article.

Originality/value

The original article was highly rated and generated discussion and important further research. It has value as part of the history of service(s) marketing research. The retrospective analysis by the author gives a unique insight into processes and thinking associated with understanding key aspects that contribute to the historical development of service(s) marketing, and provides substantial food for thought for future research directions.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

K. Douglas Hoffman, Scott W. Kelley and Holly M. Rotalsky

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation of the findings first put forward in the article Tracking Service Failures and Employee Recovery Efforts with the…

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2701

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation of the findings first put forward in the article Tracking Service Failures and Employee Recovery Efforts with the benefit of hindsight, and to offer directions for further research and developments in the research area.

Design/methodology/approach

Research directions which emanated from the publication of the article have been examined in light of current service(s) marketing theory and practice. As a result, promising current and future strands of research have been identified.

Findings

The original study yielded the initial steps into what has become a systematic step-by-step process that outlines the development and implementation of a service recovery program that now includes failure identification; failure attribution; recovery strategy selection; recovery implementation; and tracking, monitoring and evaluating effectiveness. Subsequent research has linked organistic and mechanistic components of a recovery program to important customer and financial outcomes and the development of a service recovery audit.

Practical/implications

The original study served as a starting point for the development of a set of implications for services marketing practitioners. Specifically, as a result of the original research, a programmatic approach to service recovery was developed that includes the systematic process of failure identification; failure attribution; recovery strategy selection; (4) recovery implementation; and tracking, monitoring and evaluating effectiveness.

Originality/value

The original article was highly rated, and generated discussion and important further research. It has value as a part of the history of service(s) marketing research. The retrospective analysis by the author(s) gives a unique insight into processes and thinking associated with understanding key aspects that contribute to the historical development of service(s) marketing, and provides substantial food for thought for future research directions.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Scott R. Swanson and Scott W. Kelley

The impact of service recovery attributions in determining consumers’ intentions of engaging in post‐recovery word‐of‐mouth behaviors is examined. Research questions are…

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9315

Abstract

The impact of service recovery attributions in determining consumers’ intentions of engaging in post‐recovery word‐of‐mouth behaviors is examined. Research questions are investigated utilizing satisfactory service recovery scenarios that vary in their perceived likelihood of reoccurrence (i.e. stability) and responsibility for the recovery (i.e. locus) in three service industries. Results indicate that consumers who have service failures satisfactorily corrected demonstrate a strong propensity to share positive information about their experience. As a person’s social network extends outward, stability and locus interact to influence intentions to discuss a service failure/recovery. A greater propensity to share information and higher levels of customer praise and recommendations were found for shorter service recovery times. Recommendations for customer service managers are provided.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Scott W. Kelley

Explains that efficient service delivery can often present aproblem for marketers due to the nature of the services. Summarizes thetwo general methods already suggested…

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1272

Abstract

Explains that efficient service delivery can often present a problem for marketers due to the nature of the services. Summarizes the two general methods already suggested for improving the efficiency of service delivery – technological and humanistic. Discusses managerial guidelines for the implementation of these approaches to service delivery in several service industries, based on two service classification schemes.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

K. Douglas Hoffman and Scott W. Kelley

An equity theory‐based contingency framework is presented to further our understanding of customer evaluations of the service failure/recovery process. Six contingencies…

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5710

Abstract

An equity theory‐based contingency framework is presented to further our understanding of customer evaluations of the service failure/recovery process. Six contingencies are presented that are proposed to influence the relative importance of interactional and distributive justice on consumer‐based service recovery evaluations. The six contingencies include: depth of the relationship, proximity of the relationship, duration of the encounter, degree of customization, switching costs, and the criticality of consumption. Relevant research propositions are developed and discussed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 34 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Scott W. Kelley

The competitive nature of the financial servicesmarket has placed increased importance on thesatisfaction of customer needs. This study considersthe customer orientation…

Abstract

The competitive nature of the financial services market has placed increased importance on the satisfaction of customer needs. This study considers the customer orientation of the customer contact personnel in four banks. Specifically, the relationships between employee motivation, satisfaction, and role clarity, and customer orientation are assessed. Findings indicate that motivation, satisfaction, and role clarity are all directly related to customer orientation. However, when these variables are considered together, motivation and role clarity appear to have the greatest impact on the customer orientation of employees. In addition, tellers were found to be less satisfied and motivated than other customer contact personnel. Managerial implications based on these findings are also discussed.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

K. Douglas Hoffman, Scott W. Kelley and Beth C. Chung

This study was undertaken to investigate service failures relating to problems with the management of the servicescape. Of the 1,370 failure critical incidents collected…

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7405

Abstract

This study was undertaken to investigate service failures relating to problems with the management of the servicescape. Of the 1,370 failure critical incidents collected, 123 were identified as servicescape failures. The three primary types of servicescape failures most likely to occur, listed in order of frequency, include cleanliness issues, mechanical problems, and facility design issues. The study also identifies eight servicescape subfailure type categories and discusses failure ratings, recovery strategies, recovering ratings and customer retention rates.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

K. Douglas Hoffman, Scott W. Kelley and Holly M. Rotalsky

Demonstrates a method for examining service failures and recoverystrategies in service industries and provides a typology of servicefailures and recoveries in the…

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11189

Abstract

Demonstrates a method for examining service failures and recovery strategies in service industries and provides a typology of service failures and recoveries in the restaurant industry. Based on 373 critical incidents collected from restaurant customers, uses the critical incident technique (CIT) to identify 11 unique failure types and eight different recovery strategies. Additional data regarding the magnitude of the service failure, the service recovery rating, the lapsed time since the failure/recovery incident, and customer retention rates were also collected. Presents this information along with managerial and research implications.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Scott W. Kelley, K. Douglas Hoffman and Sheila Carter

Franchise relocation and sport introduction are becoming commonplace in professional sports. However, many franchises have found that developing fan acceptance is often…

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4406

Abstract

Franchise relocation and sport introduction are becoming commonplace in professional sports. However, many franchises have found that developing fan acceptance is often challenging. The fan adoption process is presented as a systematic framework that guides strategy development from creating fan awareness through adoption. An examination of the Carolina Hurricanes inaugural season (1997‐1998) provides a variety of examples of how marketing strategy evolves throughout the fan adoption process.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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