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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

William Richmond, Scott Rader and Clinton Lanier

This research aims to contribute to the marketing and entrepreneurship literature by showing that there is a new, different digital divide for rural small businesses based…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to contribute to the marketing and entrepreneurship literature by showing that there is a new, different digital divide for rural small businesses based not on access to the internet but on its use for digital marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses data from the state of North Carolina, examining 1,000 businesses across both rural and non-rural geographies in terms of their deployment of Web and social media marketing technologies. Further, within the rural category, analysis proceeded to ascertain potential differences between “western” (mountainous) and “eastern” (coastal) rural areas.

Findings

The research concludes that despite significant improvements in broadband access in rural areas, rural small businesses still lagged in terms of adoption of state-of-the-art Web and social media marketing practices. However, between western and eastern rural areas, differences in this lag in best practice were not discovered.

Research limitations/implications

Although the data collected were limited to small businesses in North Carolina, the results may not generalize all small businesses.

Originality/value

While underserved, rural economies received apt attention with regard to closing the proverbial “digital divide” in terms of broadband (high-speed internet) services. Resolution of this disparity does not necessarily portend that those same constituents also closed the gap in terms of using online, marketing best practices that are facilitated by broadband. Policymakers wishing to promote rural economies need to address not only the existence of an internet infrastructure but also the small businesses’ willingness and ability to use it effectively.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Charles Scott Rader, Zahed Subhan, Clinton D. Lanier, Roger Brooksbank, Sandra Yankah and Kristin Spears

The purpose of this paper is to assess the state of the art in social media and pharmaceutical marketing through empirical analysis of online consumer conversations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the state of the art in social media and pharmaceutical marketing through empirical analysis of online consumer conversations. Proliferation of social media has significantly changed traditional one-way, marketing-controlled communications. Balance of power has shifted to consumers, who use social networking sites, blogs and forums to obtain extensive brand and product information, often from each other. This prompts companies towards more intimate, transparent and constant two-way consumer engagement. Pharmaceutical marketing and direct to consumer advertising (DTCA) are not immune to this pervasive, disruptive cultural/technological phenomenon, which poses particular challenges given regulatory, legal and ethical constraints on their marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses “netnographic” data collection of online conversations occurring in social media and develops an explanatory framework using grounded theory analytical methods.

Findings

This research shows that significantly impactful and pervasive bonding among consumers, bloggers and unofficial “experts” about pharmaceutical offerings is widespread, and occurs regardless (and perhaps in spite of) pharmaceutical companies’ involvement.

Originality/value

Considering the structure and nature of online consumer bonding, a way forward is proposed for pharmaceutical companies to implement social media strategies as part of their pharmaceutical marketing and DTCA efforts through an intermediary and interactive online presence arising from disease and health care education.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Clinton D. Lanier, Jr., C. Scott Rader and Aubrey R. Fowler

The purpose of this paper is to interrogate the concept of meaning and the meaning making process in consumer behavior. While the study of the consumption focuses…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to interrogate the concept of meaning and the meaning making process in consumer behavior. While the study of the consumption focuses increasingly on how consumers create meaning in a marketing dominated world, it views this process as relatively unproblematic. This paper challenges that perspective and argues that this process is inherently ambiguous.

Methodology/approach

This paper is primarily conceptual in nature. It utilizes a post-structural perspective to theoretically examine the concept of meaning and the meaning making process. It then applies this analysis to the consumption and production of popular culture. Three exemplars from the domain of digital fandom are provided to explore the conceptual arguments in the paper.

Findings

The paper argues that if the meanings of all texts are fundamentally unstable and that meaning itself is endlessly deferred in the meaning making process, then as the consumer becomes the author of the text, the instability and ambiguity of meaning and the meaning making process transfers equally to the consumption process. Rather than view this as a negative aspect of consumer culture, this paper argues that some consumers relish this ambiguity and the freedom that it gives them to manipulate these products, their textual meanings, and the readers’ identities.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation of this paper is that it is conceptual in nature. Future research should empirically examine different cases of meaningless consumption to provide more evidence of this interesting and potentially pervasive aspect of consumer behavior.

Originality/value

There is virtually no research that examines meaningless consumption. The value of the paper is that it challenges a core concept in cultural theories of consumer behavior and extends our understanding of consumption.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-323-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Roger Brooksbank, Zahed Subhan, Ronald Garland and Scott Rader

On the basis of lessons gleaned from previous research into successful strategic marketing practices in times of both recession and growth, and in the face of an ongoing…

Abstract

Purpose

On the basis of lessons gleaned from previous research into successful strategic marketing practices in times of both recession and growth, and in the face of an ongoing post-global financial crisis “hangover” characterised by unpredictable trading conditions both worldwide and in the Asia-Pacific region, the purpose of this paper is to provide insights and advice for marketing strategists within New Zealand’s manufacturing sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The inquiry is based on two point-in-time mail surveys, one during recessionary conditions and the other during favourable economic conditions, with similar samples of 427 and 272 New Zealand manufacturers, respectively. Data analyses were conducted using SPSS and sought to compare and contrast successful strategic marketing decision making between the two time-points.

Findings

The results confirm that, irrespective of prevailing economic circumstances, basic strategic marketing plays a pivotal role in facilitating the competitive success of New Zealand manufacturers. However, with the notable exception of three “evergreen” practices – targeting selected market segments, competing on the basis of value-to-the-customer, and finding new ways to do business – the results also suggest that different economic conditions otherwise necessitate quite different priorities for success at each stage of the strategic marketing decision-making process.

Research limitations/implications

Due to relatively low-response rates, the extent to which the study samples are representative of the population under scrutiny remains unknown. Also, since an identical questionnaire was administered at two time-points ten years apart, differences in the respondents’ interpretation of certain questions and some of the marketing vocabulary and terminology used cannot be ruled out.

Practical implications

The research highlights the important contribution that strategic marketing makes to the achievement of competitive success in New Zealand’s manufacturing sector. It also identifies some of the underlying “key drivers” that best predict successful strategic marketing decision making in times of recession compared with growth, thereby indicating a number of key lessons for marketing strategists.

Originality/value

This study addresses a number of gaps in the empirical marketing literature. Although many previous studies have shown various strategic marketing activities to be critical to competitive success, few have examined it as a multi-step decision-making process and none have done so in the context of New Zealand manufacturing. Nor have previous studies sought to compare and contrast effective strategic marketing decision-making set against the background of contrasting economic circumstances.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Sora Kim and Scott Rader

This paper aims to propose a typology of corporate communication strategy; to investigate whether the typology is present among Fortune 500 corporations; and to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a typology of corporate communication strategy; to investigate whether the typology is present among Fortune 500 corporations; and to explore whether there is a dominant strategy and industrial differences among them.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of all 2008 Fortune 500 corporate web sites was undertaken.

Findings

This paper finds that there are three corporate communication strategies used to affect publics' corporate associations: corporate ability (CAb) strategy; corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategy; and a hybrid strategy. The results demonstrate that a majority of corporate public relations for Fortune 500 companies emphasize a CAb communication strategy over a CSR or hybrid strategy, whereas the top 100 Fortune 500 corporations focus on a CSR strategy over the other two strategies. Industrial differences are also found in adopting different corporate strategy among the companies.

Originality/value

The applied value of this research it is that provides convincing and realistic insights about contemporary corporate communication strategy and a valuable set of communicative directives to public relations practitioners managing corporate‐context communications with stakeholders since it explores dominant corporate strategy among Fortune 500 companies.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Abstract

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-323-5

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2019

Marco Cioppi, Ilaria Curina, Fabio Forlani and Tonino Pencarelli

The purpose of this 22-year paper is to synthetize business and management literature in the context of online presence, online visibility and online reputation concepts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this 22-year paper is to synthetize business and management literature in the context of online presence, online visibility and online reputation concepts. In particular, this paper aims to generalize the analysis by investigating the level of interest of the Internet, digital and interactive marketing-focused literature, as well as the more general business and management one towards these topics.

Design/methodology/approach

To identify the existence or otherwise of an online presence, visibility and reputation definition, as well as an index for measuring them, a systematic review and a content analysis process were performed on 199 articles categorized over 1997-2018.

Findings

The findings highlight the absence of clear and shared online presence, visibility and reputation definitions; the absence of unanimously accepted indexes for measuring them; and the identification of a sequence relationship between the three investigated constructs.

Research limitations/implications

The paper underlines the need for both theoretical and empirical contributions to reduce the complexity characterizing the business and management literature focused on these topics.

Originality/value

The current study brings out interesting directions for future research studies by systematizing all the articles devoted to the online presence, visibility and reputation concepts from a business and management perspective.

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Claire Roederer and Marc Filser

This paper aims to contribute to the area of museum experience research, by exploring how consumers build stories to tell different experiences generated from a visit to a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the area of museum experience research, by exploring how consumers build stories to tell different experiences generated from a visit to a museum and by viewing these inductive findings in the light of recent research on consumption experiences (Lanier and Rader, 2015).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study is conducted. Twenty-three narratives were analysed relating a visit to ZKM museum in Karlsruhe (Germany) using narrative analysis techniques, as they are suitable to capture sensations, emotions and feelings.

Findings

ZKM museum emerges from the analysis of the narratives as a cradle for stochastic experiences (Lanier and Rader, 2015). The narratives develop several episodes that correspond to performance and liberatory experiences. A reconceptualization of the museal experience is proposed as a mesh of performance, stochastic or liberatory episodes, that capture the subject’s perspective.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to students who were 19-23 years of age and to one museum. Future research should include a wider age group and other museums.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful insights for curators, educators and exhibit designers staging museal experiences.

Social implications

The findings provide a better understanding of different experiences occurring in the same experiential context and their meaning from the subject’s perspective.

Originality/value

Lanier and Rader (2015) typology has not yet been tested in a museal context. The findings suggest that the same context can generate a set of various episodes (performance, liberatory, stochastic) within a given experience. From a methodological perspective, the results show that qualitative approaches are relevant to segment the museal offer based on sought experiences.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Hannelore B. Rader

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills…

Abstract

The following is an annotated list of materials dealing with information literacy including instruction in the use of information resources, research, and computer skills related to retrieving, using, and evaluating information. This review, the eighteenth to be published in Reference Services Review, includes items in English published in 1991. A few are not annotated because the compiler could not obtain copies of them for this review.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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