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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Robert Berry, Richard Fry, Gary Higgs and Scott Orford

The Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) is a major new collaborative socio‐economic research programme involving five higher…

Abstract

The Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) is a major new collaborative socio‐economic research programme involving five higher education institutions in Wales. This paper introduces the work of the WISERD data integration team and describes their plans for the development of an online geo‐portal. Their aim is to support WISERD researchers by providing a framework for integrating, managing and disseminating quantitative and qualitative socio‐economic data in Wales. This paper outlines the goals of this major project, discusses the concept of the WISERD geo‐portal and reports on initial investigations into geo‐portal development using free and open‐source (FOSS) software. The paper concludes with a brief summary of the future work of the WISERD data integration team.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Book part
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Barrie Gunter

Abstract

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Gambling Advertising: Nature, Effects and Regulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-923-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Gayle Porter and Nada K. Kakabadse

The aim of this study is an exploration of the behavioural addictions to work (workaholism) and to use of technology (technolophilia), particularly as they overlap in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is an exploration of the behavioural addictions to work (workaholism) and to use of technology (technolophilia), particularly as they overlap in managers' work routines and expectations placed on their employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a qualitative analysis of managers' comments from structured interviews and focus groups in several countries.

Findings

This research culminated in a model of various adaptations to both work pressure and need to use technology in today's business work, including the potential to over‐adapt or lapse into a pattern of addiction.

Research limitations/implications

The consolidation of multi‐disciplinary literature and the framework of the model will serve as a reference points for continuing research on behavioural addictions related to work and technology.

Practical implications

Human resource professionals concerned with employee well‐being can utilize the components of this model to proactively recognize problems and generate remedies. Specific suggestions are offered to offset undesirable adaptations.

Originality/value

This is the first study to focus on the mutually reinforcing addictions to work and use of technology – an important step forward in recognizing the scope of the issue and generating further research with practical application in business world.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2009

Scott S. Wiltermuth

Dominance complementarity, which is the tendency for people to respond oppositely to others along the control dimension of interpersonal behavior, is a means by which…

Abstract

Dominance complementarity, which is the tendency for people to respond oppositely to others along the control dimension of interpersonal behavior, is a means by which people create and perpetuate informal forms of interpersonal hierarchy within social relationships (Tiedens, Unzueta, & Young, 2007b). In the present chapter, I explore the likely effects of such complementarity on group creativity. I propose specifically that expressions of dominance, even those borne not out of formal hierarchy but rather out of such factors as expertise and enthusiasm for the task, are likely to elicit submissive responses from fellow group members when the group is trying to generate creative ideas. As group members behaving submissively are likely to contribute fewer ideas to group discussion, I argue that group members who behave dominantly may, through their influence on other group members, reduce both the number and diversity of ideas generated within the group. I, therefore, propose that dominance complementarity may impair groups' abilities to generate creative ideas.

Details

Creativity in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-583-3

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Haya Ajjan, William F. Crittenden and Amaleya Goneos-Malka

South Africa is one of the most unequal societies in the world with women substantially less likely to be economically active than men. This chapter draws from the theory…

Abstract

South Africa is one of the most unequal societies in the world with women substantially less likely to be economically active than men. This chapter draws from the theory of planned behavior to examine the enablers and barriers to entrepreneurship in South Africa. Specifically, we examine how attitude toward entrepreneurship, subjective norms in the South African collectivist culture, and behavioral controls of resources influence women’s intentions to start a business. Based on interviews with two successful women entrepreneurs in South Africa, we highlight the key role that government, self-efficacy, and technology-based platforms can have in establishing women’s entrepreneurial intentions.

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Go-to-Market Strategies for Women Entrepreneurs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-289-4

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2021

Stephen Hunt

This chapter uses discourse analysis to explain why entrepreneurship has become a primary response to Africa’s youth employment challenge. It analyses almost 20 years of…

Abstract

This chapter uses discourse analysis to explain why entrepreneurship has become a primary response to Africa’s youth employment challenge. It analyses almost 20 years of academic literature and publications from one of the world’s foremost authorities on entrepreneurship: the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM). The study found that youth were positioned within a discourse of entrepreneurial essentialism; where entrepreneurship was narrativised as the only option for youth employment; and youth were framed as entrepreneurship being the natural solution for them. Youth were concurrently framed within numerous contradictory entrepreneurial discourses which were used to elevate and legitimise entrepreneurship as the key pathway for addressing Africa’s youth employment challenge. An important finding in this study was that the dominant model of entrepreneurship being promoted by GEM to address the challenge is a mainly skills-based pathway to self-employment and low-growth microenterprise development. This is concerning for two reasons: firstly, global evidence does not demonstrate much support for such an approach, and secondly, it undermines other responses to youth unemployment, particularly those which seek to address more structural, demand-side barriers to employment.

Details

Enterprise and Economic Development in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-323-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Tom Kauko

It is well‐known from the literature that locational externalities influence the price formation of residential property. This effect is usually studied empirically with…

Abstract

It is well‐known from the literature that locational externalities influence the price formation of residential property. This effect is usually studied empirically with the hedonic price models, by including various neighbourhood and proximity variables in the model. These regression based techniques have, however, been criticised for a number of reasons. The arguments pertain partly to technical issues such as model flexibility, functional discontinuity and nonlinearity, and data quality, and partly to more fundamental problems regarding the nature of the value formation process. The criticism has attracted experiments with new modelling approaches, each of which adds something substantial to the hedonic approach. The study comprises two parts: it first highlights the rationale behind each broad approach composed of specific modelling techniques currently available, and then demonstrates an improvement of the demand side analysis by applying the analytic hierarchy process. This method enables quantification of qualitative expert judgements, and may lead to conclusions that go beyond the purely economic value framework.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Scott Williams and Jonathan Williams

While a return to work following trauma exposure can be therapeutic, this is not always so. As with many topics related to traumatic stress in organizations, several…

Abstract

Purpose

While a return to work following trauma exposure can be therapeutic, this is not always so. As with many topics related to traumatic stress in organizations, several contingency factors complicate the effort to draw an overarching conclusion about whether returning to work is therapeutic. The purpose of this paper is to present important determinants of whether work is therapeutic or triggering for those with traumatic stress conditions. The need for contingency approaches in the study of traumatic stress in organizations is illustrated.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature on traumatic stress in organizations is reviewed.

Findings

Three of the key determinants of whether a return to work is therapeutic or triggering for traumatic stress sufferers are trauma-type contingencies, condition-type contingencies and work-setting contingencies. For instance, human-caused and task-related traumas are more likely than natural disasters to make a return-to-work triggering. Additionally, the time since developing a traumatic stress condition is inversely related to the degree of improvement in that condition through the experience of working. Moreover, managerial actions can affect how therapeutic an employee’s return to work is.

Practical implications

These findings suggest the challenges of reintegrating a traumatized employee to the workplace can be highly situation-specific. Careful consideration of the traumatic event suffered by each traumatic stress victim, their traumatic stress condition, and the work setting to which they would return are recommended.

Social implications

Promoting mental health in organizations can contribute to employers’ social performance.

Originality/value

Examination of the factors that complicate predicting whether work is therapeutic posttrauma demonstrates how contingency approaches can advance research on trauma in organizations.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

K.A. Van Peursem, M.J. Prat and S.R. Lawrence

A bewildering variety of performance measures and indicators inhealth management is evident in the literature and in practice. Reviewsmeasures useful for health management…

Abstract

A bewildering variety of performance measures and indicators in health management is evident in the literature and in practice. Reviews measures useful for health management performance accountability, and expands on the traditional notion of health performance measures to incorporate nominal and ordinal measures. The research is performed in the interest of stimulating discussion in the public domain and with the intent of expanding current notions of the term “performance indicator”. Develops a comprehensive framework from measurement and accountability theory, and the medical management, accounting and accountability literatures are reviewed. Highlights the importance of using non‐ratio measures to capture outcomes, structure and processes influenced by management; and suggests that disclosures which include measures from all elements of the framework would most closely account for management activity.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Abstract

Details

Urban Dynamics and Growth: Advances in Urban Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44451-481-3

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