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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

William Walker Wroe, Jessica Gladstone, Tim Phillips, Scott Fish, Joseph Beaman and Austin McElroy

This paper aims to establish a method to verify in real time the quality of a part being built using Selective Laser Sintering (SLS).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish a method to verify in real time the quality of a part being built using Selective Laser Sintering (SLS).

Design/methodology/approach

A SLS build of 30 Nylon 12 tensile bars was done while using an infrared camera to record the thermal history of each bar. The thermal history was then compared to the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of each bar. In addition, an attempt was made to identify where the fracture of each bar occurred based on its thermal history.

Findings

Several analysis techniques were used to compare the thermal history of each bar to its UTS. The strongest correlation found was 0.746. In addition, multiple strategies for predicting the break location where used, with the most successful making a correct prediction on 46 per cent of the bars.

Originality/value

This paper studies the feasibility of in-situ build verification, a technique that if successful would greatly help the further adoption of SLS as a method of manufacturing.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Briony Anderson and Mark A. Wood

This chapter examines the phenomenon of doxxing: the practice of publishing private, proprietary, or personally identifying information on the internet, usually with…

Abstract

This chapter examines the phenomenon of doxxing: the practice of publishing private, proprietary, or personally identifying information on the internet, usually with malicious intent. Undertaking a scoping review of research into doxxing, we develop a typology of this form of technology-facilitated violence (TFV) that expands understandings of doxxing, its forms and its harms, beyond a taciturn discussion of privacy and harassment online. Building on David M. Douglas's typology of doxxing, our typology considers two key dimensions of doxxing: the form of loss experienced by the victim and the perpetrator's motivation(s) for undertaking this form of TFV. Through examining the extant literature on doxxing, we identify seven mutually non-exclusive motivations for this form of TFV: extortion, silencing, retribution, controlling, reputation-building, unintentional, and doxxing in the public interest. We conclude by identifying future areas for interdisciplinary research into doxxing that brings criminology into conversation with the insights of media-focused disciplines.

Details

The Emerald International Handbook of Technology-Facilitated Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-849-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

D. Scott Brandt

Why is it so hard to put your finger on electronic information? Is it because it doesn't exist as an entity, a document or book which we can hold in our hands? Is it…

Abstract

Why is it so hard to put your finger on electronic information? Is it because it doesn't exist as an entity, a document or book which we can hold in our hands? Is it because it's almost indistinguishable from the software used to produce it? For librarians, continued attempts to classify electronic information using traditional approaches haven't resolved these questions. The amount of electronic information added to the Internet is increasing constantly, and will begin competing with conventional print in making demands on resources.

Details

Academic and Library Computing, vol. 9 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-4769

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Xiaojing Zhang

This paper presents a micrograting‐based force sensor integrated with a surface micromachined silicon‐nitride probe suitable for characterizing microsurgery force on a…

Abstract

This paper presents a micrograting‐based force sensor integrated with a surface micromachined silicon‐nitride probe suitable for characterizing microsurgery force on a single cell or embryo. The probe is supported by springs of a known spring constant, and the surgical penetration force is determined from displacement measurements. The optical‐encoder force sensor exhibits configurable sensitivity and dynamic range, allowing monitoring over a wide range of forces. The periodicity of the encoder response can be used for calibration of the injector displacement and to obtain information about the localized elastic properties of the target. We used a force sensor with a measured spring constant of 1.85 N/m for penetration force measurements on Drosophila embryos, and found a penetration force of 52.5 μN (±13.2 percent) and a membrane displacement of 58 μm (±5.2 percent).

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Peter J. Batt

Using an analysis of marketing margins and the key dimensions of long‐term buyer‐seller relationships, it is possible to demonstrate that the supply chain for potatoes…

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1582

Abstract

Using an analysis of marketing margins and the key dimensions of long‐term buyer‐seller relationships, it is possible to demonstrate that the supply chain for potatoes cultivated in the Red River Delta (Vietnam) is surprisingly efficient. While the prices paid to farmers are ultimately determined by supply and demand, the price farmers receive from traders and collector agents is influenced by tuber quality and the costs of transportation. Farmers are seldom dependent on their preferred trading partner and indicate that numerous alternative traders are available to purchase the potatoes they have harvested. While the traders similarly enjoy a strong positive relationship both with farmers and collector agents and their down‐stream customers, wholesalers report that they are much less satisfied in their exchange relationship with both the traders and the retailers. Wholesalers are more dependent on both their up‐stream and down‐stream trading partners and are more dissatisfied and less trusting of their exchange partners.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Kelum Jayasinghe and Dennis Thomas

The paper aims to examine how indigenous accounting practices are mobilised in the daily life of a subaltern community, and how and why the members of that community have…

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2475

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine how indigenous accounting practices are mobilised in the daily life of a subaltern community, and how and why the members of that community have managed to preserve such practices over time despite external pressures for change.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethno‐methodological field study is employed to produce a text that informs readers about the ways in which people engage in social accounting practices. It uses the concepts of structuration theory to understand how indigenous accounting systems are shaped by the interplay between the actions of agents and social structures.

Findings

The case study suggests that it is the strongly prevailing patronage based political system, as mobilised into the subaltern social structure, which makes individuals unable to change and exercise their agencies, and tends to “preserve” and “sustain” indigenous accounting systems. Social accounting is seen as the common language of the inhabitants in their everyday life, as sanctioned by the unique form of autonomy‐dependency relationship shaped by patronage politics.

Research limitations/implications

The findings imply that any form of rational transformations in indigenous accounting systems in local subaltern communities requires a phenomenological analysis of any prevailing and dominant patronage political systems.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study that focuses on how and why local subaltern communities preserve their indigenous accounting practices over time. This contrasts with previous work that has focused on the presence or absence of accounting beyond work organisations.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Alana Mann

Abstract

Details

Food in a Changing Climate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-725-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

The long interval between the last abortive attempt to negotiate entry to the European Economic Community and the present time, when, if we read the signs aright, the…

Abstract

The long interval between the last abortive attempt to negotiate entry to the European Economic Community and the present time, when, if we read the signs aright, the atmosphere is more favourable, seems to have been a period of reflection for great numbers of people. Nothing has changed politically; “getting into Europe” is the official policy of both Government and Opposition, but many of the so‐called Marketeers are now ready to admit to there being problems. What has emerged, however, in the last year or two is that to the British people, the Common Market is not a political question; there are probably as many against it in both camps; big business remains for it, but the spate of letters in the correspondence columns of newspapers from people who, having had time to think, expressing misgivings, cannot have escaped observation by the policy‐makers. A few politicians confess to having second thoughts, mainly from concern at the price the British public may be called upon to pay.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 72 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Gessuir Pigatto, Raiane Real Martinelli, Timoteo Ramos Queiroz and Ferenc Istvan Bánkuti

This study aims to present a methodological framework to evaluate the relationship between social network centrality, individual competitiveness and network competitiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a methodological framework to evaluate the relationship between social network centrality, individual competitiveness and network competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Tilapia fish farmers in the Canoas I hydroelectric dam (states of São Paulo and Paraná, Brazil) were provided with a roster of all actors in their network and interviewed to obtain information on relational and competitiveness variables. UCINET was used to calculate the degree centrality of each farmer. Seven competitiveness drivers were combined into a single indicator to determine the level of competitiveness. A four-quadrant matrix was constructed to investigate the relationship between degree centrality and level of competitiveness.

Findings

A positive relationship was found between degree centrality and level of competitiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Agents upstream or downstream of fish farming were not interviewed, precluding an in-depth analysis of competitiveness in terms of market structure and market relations. The authors suggest that future studies should investigate the influence of upstream and downstream agents on the social network and competitiveness of fish farmers. It is also important to monitor changes in the level of competitiveness of fish farmers in the event of a national economic crisis.

Originality/value

Development of a novel methodological framework on the basis of two methodologies, social network analysis and competitiveness analysis.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Owen Fraser and Sam Sumar

Presents the compositional and spoilage changes in fish ‐ useful for determining the freshness for eating. Chemical and microbiological methods are focused on. Breakdowns…

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1189

Abstract

Presents the compositional and spoilage changes in fish ‐ useful for determining the freshness for eating. Chemical and microbiological methods are focused on. Breakdowns in chemical components lead to detectable changes ‐ odour, flavour and texture. Changes to the fats, protein, nucleotides, non‐protein nitrogen compounds and enzymes are examined. These means are more valid when dealing with preserved and frozen fish and can give accurate assessment as to fish quality.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 98 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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