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Article

John Watson, Elizabeth J. Gatewood and Kate Lewis

In this paper, the authors aim to develop a framework that provides a holistic approach to the assessment of entrepreneurial performance outcomes (EPOs) incorporating the…

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, the authors aim to develop a framework that provides a holistic approach to the assessment of entrepreneurial performance outcomes (EPOs) incorporating the multitude of factors (such as entrepreneurial goals and cultural norms) that research suggests can impact the entrepreneurial process.

Design/methodology/approach

In developing the suggested framework, the authors draw on both the existing literature and the findings provided in the five papers selected for this special issue.

Findings

The framework the authors advance suggests that the satisfaction male and female entrepreneurs derive from their ventures is principally determined by a combination of the goals they set for their business and the outcomes/outputs achieved. There is also some evidence to suggest that, other things equal, females may experience higher levels of satisfaction with their ventures than males. Other key issues the authors have incorporated into the framework that are important to a better understanding of the entrepreneurial process include the resources the entrepreneur has available (human, financial and social); various external environmental factors (for example, government support programmes); and gender (for example, to the extent that women are more risk averse than men they may set more modest goals for their ventures).

Originality/value

The holistic framework the authors present for assessing (and better understanding) the entrepreneurial process should help direct/focus: future research concerned with assessing, evaluating and understanding EPOs; government policies designed to promote entrepreneurial initiatives; and those providing advice to the sector.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article

Nancy J. Yanchus, Ryan Derickson, Scott C. Moore, Daniele Bologna and Katerine Osatuke

– The purpose of this paper is to explore employee perceptions of communication in psychologically safe and unsafe clinical care environments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore employee perceptions of communication in psychologically safe and unsafe clinical care environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Clinical providers at the USA Veterans Health Administration were interviewed as part of planning organizational interventions. They discussed strengths, weaknesses, and desired changes in their workplaces. A subset of respondents also discussed workplace psychological safety (i.e. employee perceptions of being able to speak up or report errors without retaliation or ostracism – Edmondson, 1999). Two trained coders analysed the interview data using a grounded theory-based method. They excerpted passages that discussed job-related communication and summarized specific themes. Subsequent analyses compared frequencies of themes across workgroups defined as having psychologically safe vs unsafe climate based upon an independently administered employee survey.

Findings

Perceptions of work-related communication differed across clinical provider groups with high vs low psychological safety. The differences in frequencies of communication-related themes across the compared groups matched the expected pattern of problem-laden communication characterizing psychologically unsafe workplaces.

Originality/value

Previous research implied the existence of a connection between communication and psychological safety whereas this study offers substantive evidence of it. The paper summarized the differences in perceptions of communication in high vs low psychological safety environments drawing from qualitative data that reflected clinical providers’ direct experience on the job. The paper also illustrated the conclusions with multiple specific examples. The findings are informative to health care providers seeking to improve communication within care delivery teams.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Antonia Mercedes García-Cabrera, Ana Maria Lucía-Casademunt and Laura Padilla-Angulo

This paper examines how the institutional distance between immigrants' country of residence and country of origin, as well as the regulative and normative aspects of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how the institutional distance between immigrants' country of residence and country of origin, as well as the regulative and normative aspects of institutions in immigrants' country of residence, social context variables and individual psycho-behavioural factors, condition immigrants' entrepreneurial motivation (i.e. mainly by necessity, by a combination of necessity and opportunity, or mainly by opportunity), which is in contrast to the previous literature on immigrant entrepreneurship that mainly focuses on micro-level factors.

Design/methodology/approach

By using hierarchical linear regression models to test our hypotheses, the authors analyse 468 first-generation immigrant entrepreneurs settled in 31 European countries using data from the European Working Conditions Survey (6th EWCS; Eurofound, 2015 database) combined with other datasets to derive the macro-level variables (i.e. the Doing Business Project; Hofstede et al., 2010).

Findings

The authors find that distance in the normative aspects of institutions harms entrepreneurial opportunity motivation. At the same time, however, opportunity motivation is likely to benefit from both the normative aspects of institutions that reduce locals' opportunity motivation and the distance in the regulative aspects of institutions.

Originality/value

This article analyses immigrant entrepreneurship in Europe, which has been under-examined in the extant literature, and takes into account the micro-, meso- and macro-level factors affecting the entrepreneurial motivation of immigrants in Europe. This analysis responds to the need already highlighted by previous research to include not only micro-level factors but also meso- and macro-level factors in the analysis of immigrant entrepreneurship (Aliaga-Isla and Rialp, 2013).

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article

John Watson, Michael Stuetzer and Roxanne Zolin

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating effect of an owner’s growth goal on the relationship between the gender of new venture owners and the growth outcomes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the mediating effect of an owner’s growth goal on the relationship between the gender of new venture owners and the growth outcomes of their ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study using a large, national database and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings indicate that the negative relationship between gender and growth outcomes is fully mediated by the growth goals of new venture owners, their available internal resources and the amount of time and money they are able (prepared) to invest in their new venture.

Research limitations/implications

The research implications include the need to better understand the impact of goal setting on new venture performance outcomes.

Practical implications

The government policies (for example, to stimulate firm growth) need to be designed by having a proper understanding of the various motives/goals that entrepreneurs might have when launching a new venture. Similarly, anyone providing advice to individuals involved in establishing a new venture should, before providing that advice, ensure that they have a clear understanding of the individual’s goals.

Social implications

Social implications include a need to better understand the negative impact that lower available human and financial capital can have on the goals set by female new venture owners and the outcomes achieved by those ventures.

Originality/value

This research makes an original contribution to the literature by demonstrating: the impact of gender on human, social and financial capital; the influence of these resources on new venture goals; and, in turn, the influence of goals on new venture performance outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article

Mei Chen, Peijie Ni, Torger Reve, Jing Huang and Ren Lu

Previous studies primarily focus on how to achieve better performance in the international markets, but few centers on whether internationalization is a promising strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies primarily focus on how to achieve better performance in the international markets, but few centers on whether internationalization is a promising strategy for new ventures’ growth and development. Based on two pioneering frameworks Conservative, Predictable, and Pacemaker (CPP) model and the 7-P model, this paper fills this gap by analyzing how exporting exert heterogeneous effects on two types of growth, sales growth and employment growth. Accordingly, this paper aims to favor market-oriented new ventures to make a strategy on expanding international markets.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on firm-level data from the Chinese Industrial Enterprises Database. The year 2005 was used as the shock year. By conducting the propensity score matching method, 793 couples of matched new ventures were collected with sales growth and 686 couples with employment growth. The difference-in-differences method was applied to analyze the various influences that exporting has on new ventures’ sales growth and employment growth.

Findings

The main finding of this paper is that new ventures that exported can achieve better sales growth than their counterparts that only operated domestically, whereas new ventures that remain in the domestic market have no difference in employment growth from those that exported.

Research limitations/implications

This study shows that exporting is especially beneficial for market-seeking new ventures. Because the study is based on Chinese data, scholars of international business can conduct further research on other countries with different economic structures.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this paper contributes to both international business theory and entrepreneurship theory by combining the CPP model and the 7-P model. Practically, this paper shows that exports mainly benefit the sales growth of new ventures. This suggests that business practitioners should consider their growth goals before they choose to enter the global market.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Abstract

Details

Delivering Tourism Intelligence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-810-9

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Book part

Dwan V. Robinson, Desireé Vega, James L. Moore, Renae D. Mayes and Jacob R. Robinson

There has been a substantial increase in the number of successful African Americans. However, many students, especially African American males, continue to encounter…

Abstract

There has been a substantial increase in the number of successful African Americans. However, many students, especially African American males, continue to encounter numerous academic obstacles. This chapter focuses on the factors (e.g., social, academic, personal, and familial) that African American males often have to navigate throughout their PreK-12 schooling. Hindrances, such as poverty, lack of academic readiness, poor school experiences, teacher quality, and peer influences, often negatively impact the academic progress of these students and their access to higher level or gifted instruction. In this chapter, the authors discuss strategies that best counter these factors and support and supplement gifted black boys’ educational experiences. Additionally, educational practice and policy recommendations are provided.

Details

African American Male Students in PreK-12 Schools: Informing Research, Policy, and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-783-2

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Book part

Renae D. Mayes, Paul C. Harris and Erik M. Hines

There has been a substantial increase in research concerning the identification and support of twice exceptional students. However, much of the scientific and theoretical…

Abstract

There has been a substantial increase in research concerning the identification and support of twice exceptional students. However, much of the scientific and theoretical literature exclude the experiences and perspectives of twice exceptional African American students. This chapter focuses specifically on the experiences and needs of twice exceptional African American students, including those challenges around identification and navigating the school environment. In this chapter, the authors also discuss how school counselors may use a group counseling intervention to help twice exceptional African American students achieve healthy identities (i.e., race, giftedness, disability) needed to achieve their educational goals.

Details

Gifted Children of Color Around the World: Diverse Needs, Exemplary Practices, and Directions for the Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-119-4

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Progress in Psychobiology and Physiological Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12-542118-8

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