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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Scott A. Snell and Amy Lemley

Can the return of its founding CEO turn a lagging Starbucks around? Howard Shultz must map a strategy that addresses the company's decreasing sales and perhaps too rapid…

Abstract

Can the return of its founding CEO turn a lagging Starbucks around? Howard Shultz must map a strategy that addresses the company's decreasing sales and perhaps too rapid growth. Had the previous CEO's efforts to streamline operations compromised the Starbucks experience or was a changing economy to blame? Schultz considers whether to close existing stores, slow U.S. growth while expanding overseas, and improve the customer experience, which he believed had eroded the company's value proposition.

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Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Scott A. Snell and Gerry Yemen

This case is currently taught in Darden's ““First-Year Strategy”” course. Scott Snell also teaches it in his second year elective, ““Developing Organizational…

Abstract

This case is currently taught in Darden's ““First-Year Strategy”” course. Scott Snell also teaches it in his second year elective, ““Developing Organizational Capability””. The case would be useful in any course that examines the topic of core capabilities, organizational change, or strategic alignment. This field-based case provides an overview of reorganization at AstraZeneca UK Limited (AZN) and focuses on the processes, systems, and people (human and social capital) in the R&D unit. It allows for an examination of AZN’s core capabilities and how enterprise leadership requires making an explicit connection between investments in people and performance that benefit the firm. The strategy includes: build a pipeline with new prescription drugs that were unique enough to provide a differentiated benefit to patients, grow the business globally, streamline the organization and increase efficiency, and build a culture of courage, creativity, and collaboration. What areas of R&D should the company invest in, and what would the R&D transformation look like?

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Scott A. Snell and Shad S. Morris

The knowledge that is embedded within people, relationships, and organizational routines present key, but varied, sources of capabilities needed to compete. The value of…

Abstract

Purpose

The knowledge that is embedded within people, relationships, and organizational routines present key, but varied, sources of capabilities needed to compete. The value of this knowledge depends on the investment costs and benefits that come as employees draw on and utilize these different forms of knowledge to respond to global challenges. But something as intangible as knowledge can be a major source of misunderstanding and mismanagement. The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework that explores the underlying path of how knowledge assets might be configured to overcome misunderstanding and mismanagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a framework to help scholars and organizations understand how to manage their different knowledge assets to ensure continual organizational effectiveness. To do this, the authors juxtapose three classes of knowledge assets – human capital, social capital, and organizational capital – against three types of learning – knowledge generation, transfer, and application.

Findings

The framework the authors develop provides both theoretical and practical insight into how organizations can manage their knowledge assets to overcome learning challenges.

Practical implications

The framework helps understand how organizations might align learning with their strategic challenges. It is useful in helping organizations develop a better understanding of the costs and benefits of different knowledge-management interventions according to the nature of the task and the learning needs of their organizations. When firms are confronted with challenges that present a great deal of uncertainty and they are in need of knowledge generation, transfer, and/or application, the framework could help them to identify which assets to invest in as well as the potential benefits of the investments.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in that it provides a framework linking knowledge assets with organizational learning in a way that has not been done before. It also outlines specific human resource approaches to managing these different configurations.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

In today’s highly competitive business environment, all functions in an organization are increasingly expected to justify their existence by the contribution they make to…

Abstract

In today’s highly competitive business environment, all functions in an organization are increasingly expected to justify their existence by the contribution they make to that organization’s competitive advantage. This is especially true for administrative functions: traditional perceptions must be overcome and effectiveness successfully “marketed” internally. This article looks at perceptions of HR effectiveness and argues that such perceptions challenge HR departments to think and operate strategically.

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Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2018

Manuel Alejandro Ibarra Cisneros and Felipe Hernandez-Perlines

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the relationship between the various components of intellectual capital (IC) (human, organizational, technological and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the relationship between the various components of intellectual capital (IC) (human, organizational, technological and relational) and organization performance (OP) in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the manufacturing sector in the region of Baja California, Mexico.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 127 surveys was applied to CEOs, CFOs or managers of SMEs. In order to test the research hypotheses, a multiple regression was run prior to the development of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses.

Findings

The results showed that the four capitals have a positive influence on OP; the evidence is consistent with several studies in Mexico and abroad. Furthermore, knowledge management was introduced as a moderating variable and the result was that it negatively moderates the relationship between IC and OP.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this research is that it only focused on one region and a single sector in Mexico. However, future research at the national level might verify the hypotheses tested.

Originality/value

This research contributes to enrich the theoretical framework for the Mexican context regarding IC; additionally, it allows contrasting the evidence with other studies at national and international levels.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Elizabeth Barber and James Warn

To demonstrate two distinct leadership requirements for project managers and establish a theoretical basis for distinguishing between these two types of leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

To demonstrate two distinct leadership requirements for project managers and establish a theoretical basis for distinguishing between these two types of leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework linking transactional and transformational leadership qualities with project management attributes is developed.

Findings

Explains how reactive decisions relating to monitoring of schedules and budgeting data of projects has received the greatest attention in the literature but this is only one aspect of project control. Project leadership that is proactive in controlling projects is more effective.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of our findings are substantive. Project managers who focus on proactive leadership behaviour will be more successful in completing projects on time, on budget and to the specified standard as well as achieving the strategic purpose of the project.

Practical implications

Project managers need to pay more attention to the progress of their projects and forestall any problems rather than just being reactive problem solvers.

Originality/value

The paper provides a framework for establishing the linkage between proactive decisions that impact on the direction that the project is progressing and reactive decisions that solve the existing problems of project management. It is a different focus to the traditional project management leadership knowledge base.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Saba S. Colakoglu, Niclas Erhardt, Stephanie Pougnet-Rozan and Carlos Martin-Rios

Creativity and innovation have been buzzwords of managerial discourse over the last few decades as they contribute to the long-term survival and competitiveness of firms…

Abstract

Creativity and innovation have been buzzwords of managerial discourse over the last few decades as they contribute to the long-term survival and competitiveness of firms. Given the non-linear, causally ambiguous, and intangible nature of all innovation-related phenomena, management scholars have been trying to uncover factors that contribute to creativity and innovation from multiple lenses ranging from organizational behavior at the micro-level to strategic management at the macro-level. Along with important and insightful developments in these research streams that evolved independently from one another, human resource management (HRM) research – especially from a strategic perspective – has only recently started to contribute to a better understanding of both creativity and innovation. The goal of this chapter is to review the contributions of strategic HRM research to an improved understanding of creativity at the individual-level and innovation at the firm-level. In organizing this review, the authors rely on the open innovation funnel as a metaphor to review research on both HRM practices and HRM systems that contribute to creativity and innovation. In the last section, the authors focus on more recent developments in HRM research that focus on ambidexterity – as a way for HRM to simultaneously facilitate exploration and exploitation. This chapter concludes with a discussion of future research directions.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-852-0

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2006

Bryan Sacks

Despite its stated intention to be independent, impartial and thorough, the 9-11 Commission was none of the three. The Commission was structurally compromised by…

Abstract

Despite its stated intention to be independent, impartial and thorough, the 9-11 Commission was none of the three. The Commission was structurally compromised by bias-inducing connections to subjects of the investigation, and procedurally compromised, among other reasons, by (1) its failure to take up promising lines of inquiry and its failure to try to force the release of key documents that were closely guarded by the Bush administration, the FBI and various intelligence agencies; (2) its distortion of information about pre-9-11 military preparedness, foreknowledge of the attacks or attacks of like-kind; and (3) omissions of information related to the funding of the plot and the specific whereabouts of key officials on the morning of September 11, 2001.

These structural compromises and procedural failings converged to assure that the Commission would not challenge core elements of the “official story” of the 9-11 attacks. This failure was compounded by the Commission's desire to produce a final report that would read as a “historical narrative” rather than as an exhaustive set of findings on the critical unanswered questions that arose after the attacks. The Commission's unquestioning acceptance of the official narrative also meant that it missed a perhaps larger opportunity to challenge key myths associated with American exceptionalism. Thus, the 9-11 Commission ultimately functioned as an instrument of cultural hegemony, extending and deepening the official version of events under the guise of independence and impartiality.

Details

The Hidden History of 9-11-2001
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-408-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Graeme Wines

This experimental study investigates the connotative (measured) meaning of the concept “auditor independence” within three audit engagement case contexts, including two…

Abstract

This experimental study investigates the connotative (measured) meaning of the concept “auditor independence” within three audit engagement case contexts, including two acknowledged in the literature to represent significant potential threats to independence. The study’s research design utilises the measurement of meaning (semantic differential) framework originally proposed by Osgood et al. (1957). Findings indicate that research participants considered the concept of independence within a two factor cognitive structure comprising “emphasis” and “variability” dimensions. Participants’ connotations of independence varied along both these dimensions in response to the alternative experimental case scenarios. In addition, participants’ perceptions of the auditor’s independence in the three cases were systematically associated with the identified connotative meaning dimensions.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Jacqueline Scott

Uses data from 1994 International Social Survey Programme to examine how attitudes to maternal employment at different stages of child rearing vary across and within eight…

Abstract

Uses data from 1994 International Social Survey Programme to examine how attitudes to maternal employment at different stages of child rearing vary across and within eight nations in the European Union, UK, Germany, Austria, the Netherlands, Sweden, Ireland, Italy and Spain. Considers whether a mismatch exists between belief in a women’s right to work and the “traditional” family ideology. Highlights a north/south divide in attitude and differing welfare policies and gender‐role beliefs.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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