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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Radovan Vrana

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from the research of aspects of journal publishing in the field of social sciences in Croatia in changing working…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from the research of aspects of journal publishing in the field of social sciences in Croatia in changing working conditions caused by the rapid development of information and communication technology.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an online survey of 79 journals in the field of social sciences in Croatia.

Findings

Findings indicate a dual publishing nature of the scientific journals as they exist both in the traditional paper based and in the electronic environment. In addition to slow shift towards publishing exclusively in the electronic environment, editorial teams cope with insufficient financial support for the publication of printed versions of their journals, low‐quality of article submissions, badly formatted articles, lack of help to the editor, etc. Researched journals use the internet for the improvement of the interaction with authors, reviewers and readers and digital repositories for long‐term storage of articles. To remain relevant to the scientists in Croatia, researched journals must be led by professional editorial teams whose only job will be management of the journal they work for.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the growing body of knowledge about current developments in scientific journal publishing under the influence of information and communication technology.

Details

Library Review, vol. 60 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Turid Hedlund and Annikki Roos

Open access to scientific publications is in this study looked at from the perspective of Finnish biomedical research. In the study we outline the development of open…

Abstract

Open access to scientific publications is in this study looked at from the perspective of Finnish biomedical research. In the study we outline the development of open access in Finland and the different channels for open access publishing as well as the recommendations from officials. We argue that the discipline-specific patterns of communicating research should be taken into account when studying open access adoption, and when planning for initiatives and recommendations. We have in the case study on the prevalence of open access articles on the Internet, in the field of biomedical research, found that incentives to publish in open access channels could be developed and that the impact of open access in research publishing is growing and therefore future research is needed.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-484-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Kate Bloor

This paper focuses on academic, scientific publishing, as a form of documentation and communication of scientific findings in the changing world of converging information…

Abstract

This paper focuses on academic, scientific publishing, as a form of documentation and communication of scientific findings in the changing world of converging information and communication technologies. It assesses the current state of technologies and forms of publishing electronically, and future trends and possibilities. This is linked to a discussion of the nature of the publishing industry, its form in relation to economic issues in demand and supply within publishing and specifically electronic publishing in this area. The paper suggests that the recent policy document from the European Commission, Strategic Developments for the European Publishing Industry towards the Year 2000 may present a number of difficulties for the scientific publishing industry. This strategy outlines a number of possibilities for increasing the extent of electronic publishing. These possibilities conflict with the particular situation of scientific publishers, which are generally small businesses with limited resources and expertise, and without the financial stability to be able to set up or initiate electronic publishing. The analysis of the policy suggests that the publishing industry and its representatives may need to work more closely with small publishers, so that the infrastructure may be developed to overcome these problems for these exciting new technologies, and methods of utilising them for electronic publishing, exchange of information and communication, to be fully utilised.

Details

Library Review, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1956

The First International Congress on Documentation of Applied Chemistry‐was held at the Institut Français, London, S.W. 7 on 22–25 November 1955. It was organized by the…

Abstract

The First International Congress on Documentation of Applied Chemistry‐was held at the Institut Français, London, S.W. 7 on 22–25 November 1955. It was organized by the Society of Chemical Industry at the request of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. Some 300 persons attended, of whom about 100 were from overseas; these numbers included chemists and documentalists.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2017

Justin J. W. Powell, Frank Fernandez, John T. Crist, Jennifer Dusdal, Liang Zhang and David P. Baker

This chapter provides an overview of the findings and chapters of a thematic volume in the International Perspectives on Education and Society (IPES) series. It describes…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter provides an overview of the findings and chapters of a thematic volume in the International Perspectives on Education and Society (IPES) series. It describes the common dataset and methods used by an international research team.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter synthesizes the results of a series of country-level case studies and cross-national and regional comparisons on the growth of scientific research from 1900 until 2011. Additionally, the chapter provides a quantitative analysis of global trends in scientific, peer-reviewed publishing over the same period.

Findings

The introduction identifies common themes that emerged across the case studies examined in-depth during the multi-year research project Science Productivity, Higher Education, Research and Development and the Knowledge Society (SPHERE). First, universities have long been and are increasingly the primary organizations in science production around the globe. Second, the chapters describe in-country and cross-country patterns of competition and collaboration in scientific publications. Third, the chapters describe the national policy environments and institutionalized organizational forms that foster scientific research.

Originality/value

The introduction reviews selected findings and limitations of previous bibliometric studies and explains that the chapters in the volume address these limitations by applying neo-institutional theoretical frameworks to analyze bibliometric data over an extensive period.

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Steffen Bernius

This paper aims at analysing the impact of open access (OA) on the creation, retrieval and transfer of scientific knowledge. In doing so, the focus is set on scientific

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at analysing the impact of open access (OA) on the creation, retrieval and transfer of scientific knowledge. In doing so, the focus is set on scientific research as one core function of higher education institutions. It also aims to identify potential advantages of OA over traditional subscription‐based publishing models from the viewpoint of academic scientists.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach of this study can be classified as analytical conceptual research. First the SECI model of organisational knowledge creation is applied to knowledge management in science (with the university as organisation). In a second step the resulting framework is used to describe influences of OA on the management of scientific knowledge.

Findings

OA accelerates the creation and widens the dissemination of scientific knowledge. Subject‐based repositories are suggested to provide the best conditions for retrieval of scientific knowledge. Furthermore, in terms of economic efficiency, OA has the potential to significantly decrease the costs of scholarly communication.

Research limitations/implications

In this paper the focus of investigation is academic research. Thus in order to get the “big picture” the influence of openly accessible information on knowledge management processes in teaching and administration should also be evaluated. The approach used in this paper seems to be suitable for such an analysis.

Practical implications

The findings of the paper are of interest for policy makers in higher education institutions – especially when facing decisions regarding the (financial) support of OA initiatives.

Originality/value

The paper adds a theoretically sound approach of analysing OA impacts to the existing literature in this field.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Bo‐Christer Björk and Turid Hedlund

The scientific publishing process has during the past few years undergone considerable changes. The socio‐economic structures have, however, not changed much, and many…

Abstract

The scientific publishing process has during the past few years undergone considerable changes. The socio‐economic structures have, however, not changed much, and many academics and librarians view the current situation as highly unsatisfactory. This has triggered a number of initiatives to set up e‐print repositories and electronic peer reviewed journals, which usually offer the full text for free on the Web. Serious in‐depth research studying the way the scholarly communication system is affected by the Internet is needed. In this article a formal process model of the scientific publishing process is presented (the Scientific Publication Life‐Cycle Model). The model has been developed in particular to provide a basis for studying the cost implications of different business models. It describes the life‐cycle of the single publication, in particular the refereed journal article, from the research leading to it and writing it, to being read by other researchers years later or used as a catalyst for practical implementation. Conclusions are drawn about the usefulness of the modelling methodology for this particular purpose as well as of future uses of the model itself. In addition to providing a basis for cost studies the model could function as a road map for different types of open access initiatives.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Claudia Koltzenburg

The purpose of this paper is to discuss phenomena in publishing that usually escape recognition. The aim of the research is to address exclusionary practices surrounding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss phenomena in publishing that usually escape recognition. The aim of the research is to address exclusionary practices surrounding digital objects, including those in open access journals.

Design/methodology/approach

The subject scope focuses on digital objects and how their contexts come to matter in open‐ended processes of “metadating”. The new concept of a digital object in context (doic) marks the difference between an author's file and the metadata work undertaken on it. The theoretical scope of the paper is feminist technoscience. An analogy to piezoelectric transducer technology in ultrasonography (Barad) is transferred to the context at hand. Barad's concept of “apparatus” is employed to shed new light on publishing.

Findings

The paper finds that contextual metadata should be given due attention. Metadata may show exclusionary practices that need reconsideration.

Research limitations/implications

Technology is closely intertwined with technoscientific issues and user perspectives. Yet, user perspectives are not all there is to publishing. Future research might address if exclusionary practices in publishing differ from one scientific community to another.

Practical implications

The analytical distinction between a file and its metadata serves to get a digital object on the track to better visibility. The provisional checklist helps reconsider current practices in publishing.

Originality/value

The paper infuses the open access debate with current technoscientific research and introduces Karan Barad's concept of “apparatus” to a wider audience. To research authors this paper gives crucial information for the placement decisions of their upcoming articles. For readers and innovative publishing initiatives the checklist is helpful for reflecting one's own practices. For anyone concerned with research publishing, including commercial enterprises as well as library and information scientists, the new concept of a doic generates ideas when linked to research communication as being first and foremost an economy based on gift giving for recognition.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1998

Joost G. Kircz

The development of electronic publishing heralds a new period in scientific communications. Besides the obvious advantages of an almost endless storage and transport…

Abstract

The development of electronic publishing heralds a new period in scientific communications. Besides the obvious advantages of an almost endless storage and transport capacity, many new features come to the fore. As each technology finds its own expressions in the ways scientific communications take form, we analyse print on paper scientific articles in order to obtain the necessary ingredients for shaping a new model for electronic communications. A short historical overview shows that the typical form of the present‐day linear (essay‐type) scientific article is the result of a technological development over the centuries. The various characteristics of print on paper are discussed and the foreseeable changes to a more modular form of communication in an electronic environment are postulated. Subsequently we take the functions of the present‐day scientific article vis‐à‐vis the author and the reader as starting points. We then focus on the process of scientific information transfer and deal essentially with the information consumption by the reader. Different types of information, at present intermingled in the linear article, can be separated and stored in well‐defined, cognitive, textual modules. To serve the scientists better in finding their way through the information overload of today, we conclude that the electronic information transfer of the future will be, in essence, a transfer of well‐defined, cognitive information modules. In the last part of this article we outline the first steps towards a new heuristic model for such scientific information transfer.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 54 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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