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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Abdullah M. Abu-Tineh

This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of the school-based support program (SBSP) as perceived by teachers who participated in this program. SBSP was designed to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effectiveness of the school-based support program (SBSP) as perceived by teachers who participated in this program. SBSP was designed to collectively build the capacity and promote the overall quality of teaching and learning in identified independent schools in the State of Qatar.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is quantitative in nature and was conducted using a survey methodology as its research design. A variety of statistical techniques were utilized in this research. Means, standard deviations, t-test, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were utilized to analyze gained data.

Findings

The findings indicated that teachers perceived the effectiveness of SBSP to be moderate-to- high. Further, there was a significant difference between male and female teachers in their perceptions of the effectiveness of SBSP overall. Male participant teachers perceived SBSP overall to be more effective than female participant teachers did. However, there were no significant differences among participant teachers in perceiving the effectiveness of SBSP that is attributed to their teaching experience or academic qualifications.

Originality/value

This study suggests a common level of satisfaction of the SBSP program that was launched just two years ago. At the same time, however, many recommendations and implications were discussed and suggested to enhance the effectiveness of the program.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Abstract

Details

Innovations in Science Teacher Education in the Asia Pacific
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-702-3

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Emily Lewanowski-Breen, Aoibhinn Ni Shuilleabhain and Maria Meehan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the long-term impact of participating in school-based lesson study on mathematics teachers' professional community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the long-term impact of participating in school-based lesson study on mathematics teachers' professional community.

Design/methodology/approach

A study was conducted with six mathematics teachers, from two post-primary schools in the Republic of Ireland, following up on their participation in school-based lesson study over the academic year 2012/13 (see Ni Shuilleabhain, 2016). Qualitative data were generated through one-to-one, semi-structured interviews with the participating teachers and analysed using an empirical framework for teacher community formation (Grossman et al., 2001).

Findings

Analysis of the interview responses suggests that the mathematics teachers in both schools, Doone and Crannog, had developed a mature professional community during their participation in lesson study in 2012/13. Furthermore, the research finds that, in the absence of any other professional development intervention, both teacher communities have been sustained at this level six years later. These findings suggest that a lesson study may serve as a potential structure to foster the development of sustainable professional communities within subject-based teacher groups.

Originality/value

While a lesson study has been shown to support the development of teacher professional communities, previous research has not addressed the sustainability of the communities which emerge. This study, therefore, adds to the existing literature by investigating teachers' perceptions of the long-term impact of lesson study participation on their professional community.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Eric C.K. Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to present a model to assist school leaders in managing the professional development activities of teachers. The model illustrates the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a model to assist school leaders in managing the professional development activities of teachers. The model illustrates the important role of principals in promoting continuing professional development (CPD), chiefly by cultivating a collaborative learning culture and formulating policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study tested a framework based on the input of 103 CPD coordinators in Hong Kong, who participated in a quasi-experimental design questionnaire survey. Factor analysis and reliability tests were applied to verify the constructed validity and reliability of a self-developed instrument. A Structural Equation Model (SEM) was then applied to confirm the model.

Findings

The result of the SEM shows that principal support has a predictive effect on CPD policy and a collaborative learning culture, while the effectiveness of a CPD plan is predicted by collaborative culture and management strategy.

Originality/value

This study contributes theoretically to existing literature and practically to school leaders, by supplying a model for managing teacher CPD.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Jeanne Lonergan, Geraldine Mooney Simmie and Joanne Moles

The purpose of this paper is to share findings from a Master's study exploring teacher professional learning needs with the purpose of elucidating the needs of teachers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share findings from a Master's study exploring teacher professional learning needs with the purpose of elucidating the needs of teachers, and mentor teachers, within the school cultural context in the Republic of Ireland. This study coincides with a relentless neo‐liberal drive to outsource most of what was traditionally seen as state investment across all public services, including education.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology is a small scale qualitative research study exploring the perceptions of experienced teachers in two secondary schools. It examines the conditions which may account for different levels of engagement in this regard.

Findings

The key findings show very different levels of engagement in school based teacher professional learning in the two secondary schools.

Research limitations/implications

These findings have serious implications for the type of whole school mentoring that needs to be offered within schools at a time when policymakers are mandating teacher professional learning and requiring the development of critical reasoning capacities for all pupils in a global knowledge world.

Originality/value

This study is concerned with the readiness of the experienced teacher to mentor beginning teachers, and student teachers, in ways that value co‐inquiry, care, agency and critical thinking within the ecology of a whole school environment. Mentoring has become a popular construct in everyday usage. The originality of this research lies in the use of productive mentoring as a framework developed by the authors and under continual interrogation.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Christine Grima-Farrell

The purpose of this paper is to examine the critical features and outcomes of an Australian collaborative university- and school-based immersion project for mentoring…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the critical features and outcomes of an Australian collaborative university- and school-based immersion project for mentoring final year pre-service primary teachers in the area of special education as they embed theory and practice in inclusive classrooms for a full year, to respond to diverse student needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a three-year qualitative study design, data were gathered through pre surveys and post surveys, two one-to-one semi-structured interviews, and reflexive journal entries. Analysis using triangulation of data sources and inter-rater reliability was employed to reach consensus on the key themes.

Findings

Findings suggest that mentors proved critical to reducing pre-service teacher anxieties and to enhancing their personal and professional knowledge, confidence and skills as they differentiated instruction and assessment techniques to cater for students with a diverse range of abilities.

Research limitations/implications

This research suggests that maintaining the balance of theory and practice through genuine extended school engagement experiences provided opportunities for collaborative connections on multiple levels across the school. This mentoring pathway enhanced and reinforced pre-service teachers’ professional capacity, confidence and employability potential. Limitations such as small sample size and lack of secondary school representation must be noted.

Originality/value

This work identified the importance of the unique features of a mentoring programme within a university-school partnership, including the benefits of a full-year immersion experience, financial reward, responsibility, empowerment and enhanced employability status of final year pre-service teachers as they transition to classroom teachers. This paper provides useful insights for researchers, practitioners and teacher education policy developers.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2021

Loes de Jong, Tom Wilderjans, Jacobiene Meirink, Wouter Schenke, Henk Sligte and Wilfried Admiraal

In professional learning communities (PLCs), teachers collaborate and learn with the aim of improving students' learning. The aim of this study is to gain insight into…

Abstract

Purpose

In professional learning communities (PLCs), teachers collaborate and learn with the aim of improving students' learning. The aim of this study is to gain insight into teachers' perceptions of their schools' changing toward PLCs and conditions which support or hamper this change.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were completed by a total of 2.111 teachers from 15 Dutch secondary schools for three years. With the use of multilevel regression analyses, the research questions were answered.

Findings

Although the development of a school toward a PLC seems to be a slow process, the findings demonstrate the influence of school conditions on this development. Human resource management (HRM) stands out, as this school condition has a direct and longitudinal effect on the change.

Practical implications

The main recommendation is to embed PLC elements in HRM policies such as facilitating teachers to collaboratively work and learn and aligning teachers' professional development with schools' vision and ambitions.

Originality/value

PLCs have been studied occasionally in longitudinal in-depth case studies or in large-scale, cross-sectional research. This large-scale longitudinal study provides insights into the sustainability of schools as PLCs and the school conditions that are associated with sustainability.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Neil Johnson

The current thrust towards devolution of power to schools has alteredand expanded the principal′s role. Principals are being made responsiblefor school review and…

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Abstract

The current thrust towards devolution of power to schools has altered and expanded the principal′s role. Principals are being made responsible for school review and planning, local selection of staff, school‐based staff development, performance appraisal, financial management, and the establishment of school councils. Principals need professional development to cope successfully with these new requirements. Reviews the immediate administrative training needs of school leaders, and then examines the dilemma universities face in providing appropriate administrative development. A new fee‐paying programme is proposed as a way for universities to fulfil academic responsibilities while providing school leaders with knowledge, skills and confidence for their emerging school self‐management responsibilities.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Hasan Mohsen Alwadi, Naashia Mohamed and Aaron Wilson

This study arises from a recent school-based professional development (PD) programme conducted for English language teachers (ELTs) in a secondary school in the Kingdom of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study arises from a recent school-based professional development (PD) programme conducted for English language teachers (ELTs) in a secondary school in the Kingdom of Bahrain, where a participatory lesson study (PLS) strategy was implemented to develop four ELTs' teaching skills and their senior teacher's leadership. The influence of the PLS on creating a participatory PD experience for the participants was investigated through exploring their perceptions of their professional growth during their PLS experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a qualitative interpretive approach, a total of eight lesson study cases and 16 meetings were conducted and analysed.

Findings

The main factors that influenced the participants' perceptions of their professional growth in PLS were high self-efficacy and confidence; dominancy of their peers; the informality of the PLS practice; and reflective practice. Relatedly, the results revealed critical thoughts about PLS as a means for ELT's self-directed PD in non-native English-speaking contexts.

Originality/value

The study provides an alternative approach to PD that can be offered for ELTs in any ESL/EFL context that focusses on supporting non-native English-speaking teachers' practices by associating theory with practice. This approach has enabled them to gain the practical skills they need and develop their awareness about the theoretical principles of these practices. For the first time, teachers were given the role to act as the trainers and the theorisers of their own teaching practices.

Details

International Journal for Lesson & Learning Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Yanping Fang

Emerging research on education reform in Shanghai for the last decade or so has either focused on broad contexts and trends of the second-cycle curriculum reform or the…

Abstract

Purpose

Emerging research on education reform in Shanghai for the last decade or so has either focused on broad contexts and trends of the second-cycle curriculum reform or the professional development in response to the reform or a few detailed cases of teaching improvement to meet the reform demand. Little attention has been paid to how schools as institutions have been made to respond to and enact the reform. Through three detailed school cases, the purpose of this paper is to understand their distinctive responses to reform in terms of how they interpreted, enacted and sustained their reform efforts and how more importantly lesson-case study and multi-tiered research projects has become a reinvigorated form of Chinese lesson study and teaching research to significantly mediate the school’s curriculum reform efforts. Features of sustainable development behind these cases are conceptualized by Lave and Wenger’s notion of transparency of the mediating technology of a community of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on master’s thesis reports of school leaders (2010-2016), school research publications and lesson cases as secondary data sources, an instrumental multi-case research design was adopted to build detailed case narratives and tease out cross-case comparisons.

Findings

Building on unique strengths and legacies to solve school problems, the three secondary schools responded to, enacted and sustained the reform in unique ways: case 1, a municipal key school, has focused on “three translations (of curriculum)” involving all teaching research groups (TRGs) in specifying broad curriculum standards and turning them into concrete, actionable designs and student tasks which are tested and refined through iterative cycles of lesson-case study, with the decision making for each translation informed by research projects studying problems arising. Case 2, a district key school, has capitalized on its strong TRGs and used research projects and lesson-case study to unite teaching, research and PD into a whole; and case 3, a regular neighborhood school, has aimed to build a structured PD system to tackle teacher stagnation by stressing the reflection components of each cycle of lesson-case study, challenging teachers to learn in the district-level curriculum integration experiment, and nudging them into their own research projects with well-staged support. In all the three cases, research projects have been networked connecting municipal, district, school and teachers in building a research climate. The lesson-case study has turned designs into refined actions to ensure quality of curriculum implementation and teacher growth.

Originality/value

This study yields insights into the inner workings of Shanghai’s recent curriculum reform. With strategic injection of research into the familiar institutional structures and organic cultural forms of collegiality, school innovations can be built on familiarity to create a sense of continuity, coherence and institutional identity so that teachers learn from doing with least disruption. The slow and steady work of sustaining innovations and reform goes beyond simple notions of scaling up and relies on building internal drive and institutional and teacher capacity for deep learning in responding to reform.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

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