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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Bob Lingard, Debra Hayes and Martin Mills

This history of the politics of moves towards school‐based management in Queensland education is located within a broader historical and political analysis of such moves…

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Abstract

This history of the politics of moves towards school‐based management in Queensland education is located within a broader historical and political analysis of such moves across Australia since the Karmel Report. This paper specifically focuses in on developments in Queensland. The Queensland analysis traces the moves from Labor’s Focus on Schools through the Coalition’s Leading Schools and the most recent Labor rearticulation in the document Future Directions for School‐based Management in Queensland State Schools. The analysis demonstrates that the concept of school‐based management has no stipulative meaning, but rather is a contested concept. More generally, the paper provides an account and analysis of new forms of governance in educational systems and the tension between centralising and decentralising tendencies as school‐based management is adopted in order to address a number of competing policy objectives.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Yin Cheong Cheng

Aims to develop the conception and theory of school‐basedmanagement and map its characteristics of school functioning forfacilitating the ongoing discussion and effort for…

Abstract

Aims to develop the conception and theory of school‐based management and map its characteristics of school functioning for facilitating the ongoing discussion and effort for school management reforms in local or international contexts. School‐based management employs theories of “equifinality” and “decentralization”, assumes that “school is a self‐managing system” and regards “initiative of human factor” and “improvement of internal process” as important. When compared with externally‐controlled schools, the characteristics of school‐based managing schools are very different in school functioning. They should have clear school mission and strong organizational culture. In these schools, managing strategies should encourage participation and give full play to members′ initiative; there should also be considerable autonomy of procuring and using resources to solve problems in time; the role of people concerned should be active and developmental; human relationship is open, co‐operative with mutual commitment; administrators should be high quality and always learning; and evaluation of school effectiveness should include multilevel and multi‐facet indicators of input, process and output in order to help the school learn to improve.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Megan Kimber and Lisa Catherine Ehrich

The paper seeks to apply the theory of the democratic deficit to school‐based management with an emphasis on Australia. This theory was developed to examine managerial…

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2796

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to apply the theory of the democratic deficit to school‐based management with an emphasis on Australia. This theory was developed to examine managerial restructuring of the Australian Public Service in the 1990s. Given similarities between the use of managerial practices in the public service and government schools, the authors draw on recent literature about school‐based management in Australia and apply the democratic deficit theory to it.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual in focus. The authors analyse literature in terms of the three components of the democratic deficit – i.e. the weakening of accountability, the denial of the roles and values of public employees, and the emergence of a “hollow state” – and in relation to the application of this theory to the Australian Public Service.

Findings

A trend towards the three components of the democratic deficit is evident in Australia although, to date, its emergence has not been as extensive as in the UK. The authors argue that the democratic principles on which public schooling in Australia was founded are being eroded by managerial and market practices.

Practical implications

These findings provide policy makers and practitioners with another way of examining managerial and market understandings of school‐based management and its impact on teachers and on students. It offers suggestions to reorient practices away from those that are exclusively managerial‐based towards those that are public‐sector based.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is that it applies the theory of the democratic deficit to current understandings of school‐based management.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Pak Tee Ng and David Chan

This paper aims to examine and compare the school excellence model (SEM) approach adopted by Singapore and the school‐based management (SBM) approach adopted by Hong Kong…

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2877

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine and compare the school excellence model (SEM) approach adopted by Singapore and the school‐based management (SBM) approach adopted by Hong Kong. It discusses the implications of such a strategy and the challenges that both Singapore and Hong Kong schools face in navigating a new paradigm of managerialism while satisfying the requirements of quality assurance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilises a comparative approach to analyse the development of educational quality assurance and the movement to decentralise power to the schools in Singapore and Hong Kong. The framework of analysis involves: approach to decentralisation; effects of education marketisation; school leaders, teachers and the profitable use of quality models.

Findings

Both Singapore and Hong Kong utilise a centralised decentralisation approach though with different intent. Education marketisation accentuates the underlying dynamics of fierce competition and accountability through performance indicators. To use the quality models profitably, the main challenge will be for schools to satisfy the spirit of the law rather than the letter of the law.

Practical implications

The comparative study of Singapore and Hong Kong serves as a mirror to other developing countries in understanding how a quality framework coupled with self‐assessment and external inspections can lead to changes in the school system, both positive ones and undesirable side‐effects.

Originality/value

The first comparative study between Singapore's school excellence model with Hong Kong's school‐based management.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Yin Cheong Cheng and Wing Ming Cheung

School‐based management (SBM) or school self‐management has been an important worldwide school restructuring movement since 1980s. This paper aims to map out how SBM in…

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1222

Abstract

School‐based management (SBM) or school self‐management has been an important worldwide school restructuring movement since 1980s. This paper aims to map out how SBM in terms of self‐management at the school, group and individual levels is related to school performance at different levels. From a sample of 82 schools, the strength of multi‐level self‐management in school was found to be strongly related to the quality indicators of organizational performance, moderately correlated to the quality indicators of group social norms of teachers, and individual teacher job performances. The profiles of strong and weak self‐management schools were also found to be significantly different in most indicators of school performance at different levels. The findings provide preliminary evidence to support that the success of SBM implementation for achieving school quality depends on the involvement of the school, groups and individual teachers as a whole in continuous self‐management and self‐learning cycles.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Gerald Dunning and Tony Elliott

Abstract

Details

Making Sense of Problems in Primary Headship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-904-6

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Yin Cheong Cheng

This paper aims to analyse the reform syndrome, bottle‐neck effects and their impacts on teachers and school education in the last ten years and highlight the direction of…

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3883

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the reform syndrome, bottle‐neck effects and their impacts on teachers and school education in the last ten years and highlight the direction of new developments.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines educational reforms in Hong Kong in the last decade.

Findings

Echoing the international trends of educational reforms, Hong Kong, as an international city, has initiated a series of educational reforms in the past decades. The experiences of educational reforms in Hong Kong may provide a good case for understanding the dynamics of educational reforms and drawing theoretical and practical implications for research, policy formulation and implementation not only in Hong Kong but also in other international communities.

Originality/value

From the analysis of the reform syndrome, particularly the bottle‐neck effect, there should be seven key aspects for policy‐makers, educators and stakeholders in Hong Kong to address the emergent key issues in educational reforms and work for the further development of their education system in the coming few years.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

James Ko, Yin Cheong Cheng and Theodore Tai Hoi Lee

The purpose of this paper is to trace the development of school autonomy and accountability and related multiple changes and impacts in key areas of school education in…

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1166

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to trace the development of school autonomy and accountability and related multiple changes and impacts in key areas of school education in Hong Kong since implementing school-based management (SBM) from 1990s.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore the evolution and the uniqueness of autonomy and accountability in the Hong Kong school system, the paper begins with an historical account, followed by an evaluation of the effects of SBM as shown in policy documents, local research, international reviews and illustrative findings from a case study. The local and international implications of SBM for research and practice are then discussed.

Findings

This paper shows the links between school autonomy and accountability by exploring the potential effects of both of these factors on educational management and student achievement, which are increasingly emphasised in educational policies. The investigation shows that the assumed links and effects are not always consistent or empirically supported. The positive effects that school autonomy has on school governance and management, teachers’ work, school-based curriculums and student learning are all significant when there is also strong leadership, comprehensive continuous professional development and a positive, collaborative school climate. These key elements work alongside school autonomy to facilitate positive change.

Research limitations/implications

School autonomy and accountability should be viewed as necessary, but not sufficient, conditions for school improvement and development. Further characterisation of the processes happening in schools is needed to explore the different realisations of school autonomy and accountability.

Originality/value

This investigation of school autonomy and accountability in Hong Kong provides the international audience with a deeper understanding of the dynamics involved in the development of SBM.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Mobarak Hossain

School inspection or supervision is one of the core institutional mechanisms for ensuring the quality of education. While analyzing the practices of this quality assurance…

Abstract

School inspection or supervision is one of the core institutional mechanisms for ensuring the quality of education. While analyzing the practices of this quality assurance tool at the basic education level in six developing and emerging economies, this paper found that there has been a major shift in exercising supervision system pushed by the policy dynamics of both international actors and state institutions. The school supervision system has been shaped by decentralization, school-based management, monitoring, data gathering, and output-focused governance. These are also known as the elements of New Public Management (NPM). The growing practice of NPM in all these countries has made the external supervision a less prioritized issue, which is evident in its stagnated and sometimes deteriorated state. On the other hand, the pro-NPM management system advocating for greater autonomy, decentralization and results has not evidently yielded any major positive outcomes, especially in lower-income countries. Thus, the absence of an effective supervision system, both support and control, has created a vacuum in the educational quality assurance instruments. By oversimplifying local contexts in situating NPM, this foreign-emerged management system also has shown reluctance toward fundamental crises of weak institutions in lower-income countries, including resource constraints, skills shortage, and service recipients’ lack of trust, among others. In short, developmental level and institutional capacity matter for the successful implementation of NPM.

Details

Cross-nationally Comparative, Evidence-based Educational Policymaking and Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-767-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Evia O.W. Wong

The 1990s are an important era of the Hong Kong education system. The introduction of school‐based management arouses a number of school reforms to keep up with the…

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2815

Abstract

The 1990s are an important era of the Hong Kong education system. The introduction of school‐based management arouses a number of school reforms to keep up with the changing demands of the community which synthesizes into a global and knowledge‐based economy emphasizing the development of attitudes towards life‐long learning and multiple intelligence. The school reforms arouse a number of critical impacts on the school governance and management targeting at providing students with learning opportunities in an authentic and meaningful context. This in turn raises the importance of leadership style for effective school‐based management covering the aspects of vision, mission and goals; change and strategic thinking; people as well as school culture.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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