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Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2016

Paul J. Riccomini, Jiwon Hwang and Stephanie Morano

While deficits for students with learning disabilities (LD) are prevalent in almost all aspects of mathematics, difficulty in the application and understanding of…

Abstract

While deficits for students with learning disabilities (LD) are prevalent in almost all aspects of mathematics, difficulty in the application and understanding of problem-solving tasks are much more challenging to remediate than computational and procedural skills. Given the complexities involved in authentic problem-solving activities emphasized in current mathematics standards and the inherent challenges presented to students with LD, the importance of using strategies and techniques guided by evidence-based practices is paramount. Yet, ineffective instructional strategies for problem solving are still widespread in both mathematics curricula and available teacher resources. In this chapter, we provide a description of a commonly used ineffective problem-solving strategy (i.e., the keyword strategy), an overview of the keyword research, and an explanation for its ineffectiveness. We conclude with a description of three evidenced-based problem-solving approaches and practices that significantly improve the mathematical performance of students with LD.

Details

Instructional Practices with and without Empirical Validity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-125-8

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Sugumar Mariappanadar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible consequences of the intra-individual level-based perceptions of participative, supportive and instrumental leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible consequences of the intra-individual level-based perceptions of participative, supportive and instrumental leadership styles and the dissonance factors of leadership styles perceptions on employee engagement using the information-processing and connectionist perspectives of leadership perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses relating to direct and moderated effects of perceptions of leadership styles on employee engagement were tested using a two-stage intra-individual level study (n=172 in each stage). Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings revealed that perceptions of preferred and experienced supportive leadership styles are individually important predictors of employee engagement. It was also revealed that differentiated leadership styles have stronger (complementary) effect on employee engagement when the perceptions of experienced participative and supportive leadership styles were aligned with perceptions of respective preferred leadership styles. Furthermore, it was also found that the low level compared to the high level of dissonance factor or the difference between preferred and experienced instrumental leadership style acted as a complementer on employee engagement.

Research limitations/implications

This study has made contributions to facilitate scholars to build better information-processing models and implicit theories for differentiated leadership and employee engagement links. Finally, the study provides new information on the consequence of perceptions of leadership style and the dissonance factor of leadership perceptions on followers’ actions such as employee engagement.

Originality/value

This will be the first empirical study examining the relationships between the dissonance factor of leadership perceptions of participative, supportive and instrumental styles and employee engagement.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Nadia Steils, Alain Decrop and Dominique Crié

As traditional paper manuals and step-by-step instructions have shown to discourage new product learning because of a lack of exploration, the purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

As traditional paper manuals and step-by-step instructions have shown to discourage new product learning because of a lack of exploration, the purpose of this paper is to investigate consumer learning from an online and andragogical, that is, adult learning, perspective by identifying relevant consumer e-learning processes in new product learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses thematic and trace analyses on a multi-method data collection, that is, extant e-learning courses, in-depth interviews and non-participant observations.

Findings

Emerging findings give light on customized, interactive and iterative e-learning processes depending on consumers’ previous experiences, their learning orientation as adult learners and the characteristics of the online environment. Results provide evidence for the existence of three learning strategies and show how the online environment comes shifting traditional consumer learning paradigms.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on consumer behavior on two levels. First, the findings highlight the importance of taking an andragogical standpoint to provide a more nuanced and realistic view on consumers’ learning processes in new product learning. Second, the results show how the exploration and interactivity provided by the online environment present beneficial prerequisites for effective consumer learning. More than just being an alternative, online learning is complementary to offline modes of learning to improve consumers’ overall learning experience.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Abstract

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Georgios Halkias

This paper aims to review the notion of schemata in consumer behavior, placing particular emphasis on the conceptualization of brand knowledge, and illustrate how schema…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the notion of schemata in consumer behavior, placing particular emphasis on the conceptualization of brand knowledge, and illustrate how schema theory may act as a unifying conceptual framework to study what consumers know about products and brands. Extant research on how consumers conceptualize brands lacks a single, coherent theoretical framework. The literature is fragmented into different approaches that may prevent comparisons across studies and make it difficult to draw conclusive results.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the central tenets of schema theory and then presents the structure of schematic knowledge and the main typology of consumer schemata. It focuses on the brand schema, delineating its internal properties and drawing analogies with other approaches used to describe consumers’ mental representation of brands.

Findings

Schema theory can provide a comprehensive framework to analyze how consumers perceive brand information. A cognitive schema specifies the parameters of knowledge content, discriminates between different types of information and indicates how various pieces of information relate to one another. Importantly, the internal structure of schemata remains stable across conceptual domains, allowing to investigate brand-specific knowledge in different contexts and in conjunction with superordinate and subordinate knowledge structures.

Originality/value

This is the first systematic review of the notion of schemata in consumer behavior. It thoroughly describes how schema theory from psychology has been applied in marketing research to describe the organization of market knowledge and illustrates how it may function as an analytical tool.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Simona D'Antone and Dwight Merunka

The purpose of this paper is to explore how brand origin (BO) cues affect the consumer’s association of a new brand with BO learning and the subsequent effects on brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how brand origin (BO) cues affect the consumer’s association of a new brand with BO learning and the subsequent effects on brand image (BO semiotics). An integrative theoretical framework is proposed that includes both processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model is based on analogical learning theory and triadic semiotic theory.

Findings

Two types of BO knowledge form BO meanings in consumer minds: country-related categories and exemplar brands, which have a classification and/or inferential role. The brand cues (indexes or icons) used by consumers to identify BO generate one or the other type of BO knowledge. Indexes trigger the classification function of country-related categories while icons trigger the inferential role of country-related categories and exemplar brands. BO knowledge informs the meaning transfer when consumers interpret the meaning of a new brand, leading to either a transfer of relations or a transfer of attributes to the new brand.

Practical implications

Marketers should monitor BO exemplar brands that consumers use as meaning sources and carefully select the signs used in their communications to evoke BO.

Originality/value

The proposed framework contrasts with dominant categorisation perspectives, re-establishing the dual role of categories and emphasising the relevance of brand cues in BO identification and BO exemplar brands in the BO meaning transfer process. A meaning-centred perspective is adopted to integrate BO identification and the related transfer mechanisms.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Kem Z.K. Zhang, Xiang Gong, Chongyang Chen, Sesia J. Zhao and Matthew K.O. Lee

Drawing from the spillover effect literature, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the spillover effect in consumers’ web-mobile payment extension behavior. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the spillover effect literature, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the spillover effect in consumers’ web-mobile payment extension behavior. The authors figure out two categories of factors associated with the spillover effect: relevant schema and schematic fit. Cognitive trust and emotional trust in web payment are used to capture relevant schema, while perceived similarity and perceived business tie are proposed to denote schematic fit in the web-mobile payment extension context.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey (n =552) was conducted to empirically test the model. The data were analyzed by structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

The results show that relevant schema and schematic fit factors positively influence perceived value of mobile payment (MP), which facilitates consumers’ behavioral intention of MP.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the extant literature by theoretically identifying the key factors of the spillover effect and empirically investigating its role during the web-mobile service extension process.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Wu Chen

Puts forward a new method for decomposing relational schemas by using semi‐equivalence relations based on pansystems methodology. A necessary and sufficient condition is…

Abstract

Puts forward a new method for decomposing relational schemas by using semi‐equivalence relations based on pansystems methodology. A necessary and sufficient condition is obtained for determining whether there exists a subschema logically available in a given relational schema decomposition.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2007

Jingshan Huang, Jiangbo Dang, Michael N. Huhns and Yongzhen Shao

The purpose of this paper is to present ontology alignment as a basis for mobile service integration and invocation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present ontology alignment as a basis for mobile service integration and invocation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an automated schema‐based approach to align the ontologies from interacting devices as a basis for mobile service invocation. When the ontologies are ambiguous about the services provided, compatibility vectors are introduced as a means of maintaining ontology quality and deciding which service to choose to reduce the ambiguity.

Findings

Both precision and recall measurements are applied in the evaluation of the alignment approach, with promising results. In addition, for the compatibility vector system, it is not only proved theoretically that the approach is both precise and efficient, but it also shows promising results experimentally.

Originality/value

In cases where sufficient resources are not available and only a certain number of mobile devices can be chosen for interaction, this approach increases the efficiency by choosing suitable mobile device(s).

Research limitations/implications

This current approach makes use of a center ontology, but introduces the problem of how to handle the vulnerability issue inherent in this centralized solution. To analyze and solve this problem is a potential research direction.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Emily Bouck and Rajiv Satsangi

Mathematics can be a challenging content area for all students and especially for students with disabilities. Assistive technology can support the access, participation…

Abstract

Mathematics can be a challenging content area for all students and especially for students with disabilities. Assistive technology can support the access, participation and achievement of students with disabilities in mathematics in general and in inclusive mathematics settings in particular. In this chapter, assistive technology to academic and functional mathematics will be discussed; particularly, manipulatives, calculators and other technology-mediated mathematics interventions (e.g., apps or computer programs) will be highlighted.

Details

Assistive Technology to Support Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-520-7

Keywords

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