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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Rohit Gumber, John Devapriam, David Sallah and Sayeed Khan

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the current competencies and training needs for being an expert witness of trainees (CT3, ST4-6) and career grade psychiatrists…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the current competencies and training needs for being an expert witness of trainees (CT3, ST4-6) and career grade psychiatrists (consultants and staff grade, associate specialist and specialty doctors) in a UK health and well-being Trust.

Design/methodology/approach

This was completed through an online survey, developed by the authors, of all career grade and trainee psychiatrists within the Trust.

Findings

Only 9 per cent of respondents reported that they felt they had adequate training to feel competent as an expert witness. Despite low levels of training and confidence, 73 per cent of respondents had written an expert report. As well as shortage of training opportunities for psychiatrics acting as expert witnesses, the findings indicated increasing fear of litigation and lack of direct experience of court proceedings during training.

Practical implications

Doctors need to be offered formal training opportunities including simulated training, ideally organised within Trust, Continuing Professional Development (CPD) committees or Education committees. Implementation of the RCPsych report guidance into speciality curricula and CPD opportunities for doctors would ensure a robust curriculum-based delivery of these essential skills.

Originality/value

A wealth of guidance is available for expert witnesses, but no previous study had identified the specific training issues and overall confidence in competency to act as an expert witness amongst psychiatrists. It will be valuable to all psychiatrists involved in court work and organisations involved in training psychiatrists, especially in light of recent relevant court cases and removal of expert witness immunity.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 July 2022

Shamsul Huq Bin Shahriar, Sayed Arafat, Intijamul Islam, J. M. Ekram Hossain Nur, Saifur Rahman, Syful Islam Khan and M. Sayeed Alam

The extreme measures that have been taken by governments across the globe to minimize the spread of COVID-19 have had significant impacts on almost all the public sectors…

Abstract

Purpose

The extreme measures that have been taken by governments across the globe to minimize the spread of COVID-19 have had significant impacts on almost all the public sectors, especially on the economy and education. This study aims to address the approaches and prospective of online-based training and e-learning for employee learning and development during this COVID-19 crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

With an emphasis on the qualitative approach and considering the complex COVID-19 emergency, required data were collected from in-depth interviews to interpret the experiences of the respondents.

Findings

The findings suggested that the digital learning ecosystem offered flexibility of time, place and pace, which provided essential convenience during the COVID-19 crisis. From the human resource (HR) perspective, the e-learning culture has enabled the organizations to quickly adopt the new normal, secure sustainable continuity of organizational development and ensure decent work and growth within and across organizations. The adoption of e-learning and flexible working conditions following the setback has enabled the organizations to quickly cope up with the new normal, causing a significant paradigm shift in the organizational culture and corporate sector of Bangladesh.

Research limitations/implications

The study will assist the HR of any organization to contemplate e-learning systems as effective alternative training methods. Also, the study will be suggestive to traverse new dimensions and skillsets for the pedagogues.

Originality/value

This study offers new evidential scenarios regarding the emergence of effective e-learning initiatives and online-based learning programs for developing the workforce to be efficient and productive even in distressful and inconvenient COVID-19 situations.

Details

Management Matters, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2279-0187

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Md Jakiul Islam, Md Abu Sayeed, Shakil Akhtar, Md Sakhawat Hossain and Afroza Akter Liza

The purpose of this paper is to conduct consumer profile analysis for chicken, beef, mutton, fish and egg to better adapt the marketing mix for each type of food in Bangladesh.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct consumer profile analysis for chicken, beef, mutton, fish and egg to better adapt the marketing mix for each type of food in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates the mean consumption frequency of chicken, beef, mutton, fish and egg, following 658 questionnaire survey results. The sociodemographic variables used in this study were: sex, age, gender, educational level, social class, number of family members in the home, the presence of minors less than 18 years in the home and geographical area. Frequency distribution, factor and cluster analysis were performed to understand the food consumption frequency and food-related lifestyle segment, respectively. The statistical significance for differences among the mean values of different foods was tested by Snedecor’s F-test.

Findings

Egg was the most frequently consumed; 77 per cent of respondents ate egg once daily. Chicken was the second most consumed (62 per cent), whereas fish was third (59 per cent). Mutton was in the fourth place of consumption frequency level. However, 24 per cent of respondents did not consume mutton. The same types of behaviour were observed for beef, which was the least consumed (7 per cent) once daily, 48 per cent once a week, whereas 13 per cent did not consume it. There was no specific consumer behaviour pattern for the sociodemographic variables and types of food studied here.

Originality/value

This research provides the status of consumer preferences towards chicken, beef, mutton, fish and egg consumption in Bangladesh.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Abdullah Z. Sheikh

The purpose of the paper is to report on an in‐depth study of “pay‐rolling” agencies. Pay‐rolling agencies are a particular form of employment intermediaries through which…

1382

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to report on an in‐depth study of “pay‐rolling” agencies. Pay‐rolling agencies are a particular form of employment intermediaries through which employers attempt to bypass statutory obligations concerning workers' benefit entitlements and trade union rights, simply by paying workers through an agency. The paper was prompted by the growing amount of anecdotal evidence suggesting proliferation of pay‐rolling agency systems in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper involved a total of 97 interviews were undertaken in six case studies across three industrial sectors with employees, employers, agency and union officials and industry specialists.

Findings

Findings revealed sufficient evidence on the use of pay‐rolling agencies. The results confirmed the anecdotal evidence that some employment agencies are not truly genuine. The evidence suggested that there is a growing trend for agencies to be simply a sham arrangement, refuting the notion that temporary agency work has only been a natural and inevitable response to changes in the economy.

Originality/value

The paper furthers the understanding of the motives and characteristics of agency employment beyond the conventional model of genuine agency work.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Nadeem Yousaf

Transformational and transactional leadership have become a fascinating issue for research since the work of Burns (1978) and Bass (1990). The purpose of this paper is to…

1655

Abstract

Purpose

Transformational and transactional leadership have become a fascinating issue for research since the work of Burns (1978) and Bass (1990). The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the usefulness of the concept of transformational leadership using examples of political leadership from South Asia. It is argued that the construct of transformational leadership is practically non-existent. And, if the concept of transformational leadership exists, it cannot be specifically applied to the leaders who gain popularity and achieve their goals. It is also argued that positive and negative connotation with transformational and transactional leadership, respectively, is false. The popular leadership may be good for “one-point agenda,” but not necessarily transform the system.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods, historical analysis, and discourse analysis have been employed to understand the leaders’ actions and behaviors.

Findings

The discussion around the empirical examples show that the popular-successful leadership does not necessarily a transformational leadership even though the leadership achieves the goals.

Originality/value

The popular or so-called transformational leadership may be good to achieve one-point agenda, but it may not bring the required change and fruitful results to all stakeholders if it is not backed by a transactional strategy. Future research may turn the attention in three directions: whether or not the achieved goals were transformational or transactional; evaluation of leaders’ behavior from the perspective of consequential leadership; and the role of transactional leaders in the growth and strengthening of micro and macro organizations.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Toseef Azid, Rana Ejaz Ali Khan and Adnan M.S. Alamasi

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the factors that influence the decision of married women (in the age group of 16‐60 years) to participate in labor force activities.

1890

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the factors that influence the decision of married women (in the age group of 16‐60 years) to participate in labor force activities.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an empirical study employing the non‐linear maximum likelihood probability (probit) function on primary data (3,911 observations).

Findings

Besides other variables it has been observed that poverty remains an important determinant of female labor participation.

Research limitations/implications

On the basis of this paper, a socio‐economic policy can be formulated for a developing country like Pakistan.

Practical implications

A development policy (especially considering the gender aspects) can be formulated on the basis of this research for the enhancement of human resource development for a developing and an orthodox economy like Pakistan.

Originality/value

This paper is beneficial to researchers, policy makers, and social scientists for the enhancement of the level of social welfare and equity through its findings.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Santosh Mehrotra and Mario Biggeri

The aim of the paper is to understand whether children in home‐worker (HW) households in Pakistan and Indonesia are more likely to work than other children, and, if so…

1427

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to understand whether children in home‐worker (HW) households in Pakistan and Indonesia are more likely to work than other children, and, if so, how this impacts their capabilities. The paper also aims to outline some policy implications for the two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are drawn from two ad hoc surveys and country studies carried out in Pakistan and Indonesia in 2000/2001. The paper examines the incidence and reasons of child work and child schooling in home‐worker households, the work conditions, and gender issues. A bivariate probit is applied to analyse the determinants of child activity status.

Findings

Children from HW households have a higher probability of working. There is evidence of the feminisation of home work from childhood. This is dramatic in Pakistan while little evidence is found for Indonesia. In Pakistani urban slums the majority of children are working, but in Indonesia they are in school. The mother's education and per capita income/expenditure or assets in the household are important determinants of the child's activity status.

Research limitations/implications

The model cannot use the control group for econometric analysis since the number of households and children interviewed (although randomly chosen) are not sufficient.

Practical implications

Collective action plays a role in the reduction of children “only working”. The number of hours that children work in Pakistan suggests that their ability to do school‐related activities is likely to be impacted.

Originality/value

Although child labour is common in home‐based manufacturing activities in the informal sector in most Asian developing countries research on child labour remains scarce. This paper contributes to this area of research.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2012

Riaz Ahmed Shaikh

The question of civilian supremacy over managing state affairs has been revisiting Pakistan time and again; the case is the same these days. Assuming its strategic…

Abstract

The question of civilian supremacy over managing state affairs has been revisiting Pakistan time and again; the case is the same these days. Assuming its strategic location at the crossroads of Middle East-Central South Asia, the country has a lot of potential not only to prosper and progress, but it can play a pivotal role in restoring peace and stability in the region.

Pakistan's civilian leadership has mostly supported the concept of peaceful coexistence with all neighboring countries, but the theory of animosity propagated by Pakistan's army with its neighbor, especially India, has kept the world's sixth most populous nation in a state of war ever since its inception. This chapter discuses the perpetual conflict between the civil-military approaches and how it is effecting regional peace.

Details

Cooperation for a Peaceful and Sustainable World Part 1
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-335-3

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Muin‐ud‐din Ahmad Khan

Significance of Knowledge The functional name of the Holy Quran is ‘huda’, the guiding light. It focuses divine light on each and every object separating thereby the right…

1037

Abstract

Significance of Knowledge The functional name of the Holy Quran is ‘huda’, the guiding light. It focuses divine light on each and every object separating thereby the right from the wrong' (al‐furqan). As this is accomplished by dint of knowledge (al‐ 'ilm). All these three guiding elements namely huda, furqan and ilm, are lined‐up by Allah, the Lord Providence (Rabb‐ulalamin), for earthly welfare (hasanah) and other‐worldly salvation (falah) of human beings. In Quranic context, knowledge, therefore, carries a great significance.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2009

Riaz Ahmed Shaikh

The prolonged army rule in the country has affected the policymaking procedure of the state. Specifically, defence and foreign policies of the country are normally decided…

Abstract

The prolonged army rule in the country has affected the policymaking procedure of the state. Specifically, defence and foreign policies of the country are normally decided by the armed forces of Pakistan as per their own priorities, which is against the norms of democratic culture and supremacy of the civilian rule.

The control of important decision-making process in the hands of the armed forces has generated an arms race in the subcontinent. The major portion of the national budget is being spent on the defence forces and other sectors such as education and health and social welfare are not getting their due share from the revenue of the country. The continued sense of insecurity and animosity with neighbour countries, especially India, has resulted in speeding the acquisition of sophisticated arms in the country.

This research discusses the effects of the military's role in the decision-making of the country and its impacts on the relations between India and Pakistan. The confidence building measures and peacemaking process in South Asia is dependent on the attitude of the military of both the countries.

Details

Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-893-9

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