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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1972

Joel Montague, Margot Higgins and Saul Helfenbein

The operational, economic, and cultural obstacles to pre‐school nutrition programs outlined in the first half of this paper have arisen largely because few nationwide programs…

Abstract

The operational, economic, and cultural obstacles to pre‐school nutrition programs outlined in the first half of this paper have arisen largely because few nationwide programs have as yet gone beyond the thinking of a nutrition program as being more than the mere distribution of food. Reaching the pre‐school child is often perceived only as a logistic exercise in delivery and distribution, and the success of the program is thus judged solely on the basis of the speed, economy and efficiency of distributive systems. Under those circumstances, available resources are not used to their fullest potential and program effectiveness, in terms of demonstrable nutritional benefits to the recipient and institution building, continues to be disappointing when weighed against the cost and effort involved. The per capita cost of reaching the pre‐school child, given the difficulty of distribution via an inadequate number of scattered and ill‐attended centers, will probably continue to be exorbitant in most places as long as pre‐school feeding programs are regarded as exactly comparable with school feeding in all respects except the age of the beneficiary.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1972

Joel Montague, Margot Higgins and Saul Helfenbein

Current research indicates that early protein‐calorie malnutrition, which in some developing countries may affect 20% of all pre‐schoolers, is a serious deterrent to social and…

Abstract

Current research indicates that early protein‐calorie malnutrition, which in some developing countries may affect 20% of all pre‐schoolers, is a serious deterrent to social and economic development because of its deleterious effect on the health, education, and productivity of the adult. Chronic undernourishment, though its manifestations are less apparent, may be equally damaging. Benefits expected from the ‘Green Revolution’ certainly cannot reach most of the world's population at need soon enough to prevent the erosion of human resources, and the existence of malnutrition must be recognized as a threat to national development, not merely a moral problem whose solution is thought of in medical or public health terms. Unfortunately however, national nutrition programmes undertaken in developing countries have thus far, by and large, shown disappointing results.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 72 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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