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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Obaid Almotairy, Margarita Maria Lenk and Norman Schultz

The stock market in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is quickly developing and maturing. While the inefficiencies of this market have already been attributed to its mechanics…

Abstract

The stock market in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is quickly developing and maturing. While the inefficiencies of this market have already been attributed to its mechanics (Abdeen and Shook, 1984; Butler and Malaikah, 1992; Abdelkader, 1993), information concerning the market players has not been available. This research reports descriptive results of 74 interviews with Saudi investors. The results provide insight into the information that is used for investing decisions, support prior evidence of market inefficiency, and encourage more research in this area.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Mohammad I. At‐Twaijri

A study is described involving the use of questionnaires toinvestigate the situational factors (economy, government, technology,competition, culture, demography) that…

Abstract

A study is described involving the use of questionnaires to investigate the situational factors (economy, government, technology, competition, culture, demography) that affect the banking industry in Saudi Arabia. The results reveal that culture and technology are viewed as less important than the government and the economy. It is advisable for banking strategists to start thinking about the importance of culture, demography, and technology in Saudi Arabia. Considering the rise in Islamic awareness, bankers should in some way create an atmosphere to benefit from this trend and change it to a positive factor. More attention should be directed towards integrating technology, culture and demography.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Mohammed I. At‐Twaijri, Abdelaziz A. Al‐Dukhayyil and Ibrahim A. Al‐Muhaiza

This article reports the results of a field study that aims to investigate the differences, if any, that exist between Saudi Arabian and U.S. supervisors, as perceived by…

Abstract

This article reports the results of a field study that aims to investigate the differences, if any, that exist between Saudi Arabian and U.S. supervisors, as perceived by their subordinates. It is assumed that any differences that exist are culturally bound and have a positive or negative effect on subordinates by making the work environment pleasant or unpleasant. The findings point to the existence of differences between Saudi Arabian and U.S. supervisors with regard to the subordinates' welfare, claiming subordinates' original ideas, performance evaluation, control, knowledge of the job, willingness to explain job duties to subordinates and motivation. Suggestions have been provided to reduce these differences in the work climate.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1979

Ziauddin Sardar

Saudi Arabia is one of the most rapidly developing members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). The rapidly growing economy of Saudi Arabia has a…

Abstract

Saudi Arabia is one of the most rapidly developing members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). The rapidly growing economy of Saudi Arabia has a number of important features which make it quite different from any other major economy. With a growth rate of over 60 per cent, the Saudi economy is dominated by the petroleum sector. However, the growth rate of the non‐oil sector, the diversification of which is the main objective of Saudi development policies, is no less spectacular: currently it is registering a growth rate of over 10 per cent. Agriculture accounts for about 3 per cent of the GDP, and manufacturing activities slightly less than 2 per cent. Net factor income payments to the rest of the world are negative and hence the gross national product is smaller than the gross domestic product.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Bjorn Bjerke and Abdulrahim Al‐Meer

Analyses the Saudi Arabian culture in terms of Hofstede′s fourdimensions: power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism, andmasculinity. Bases the analysis on a…

Abstract

Analyses the Saudi Arabian culture in terms of Hofstede′s four dimensions: power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism, and masculinity. Bases the analysis on a survey of Saudi Arabian MBA students and their co‐workers. Saudi Arabia is a “typical” Moslem country, except for the fact that it scores very high on “power distance”. Discusses the Saudi culture′s consequences in terms of effective management behaviour, intuition, and organizational structures and questions the applicability of American management theories in the Saudi context.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Ugur Yavas and Secil Tuncalp

Consumer susceptibility to country of origin effects has been demonstrated in the past. Formulation of a successful export marketing strategy for Saudi Arabia can be…

Abstract

Consumer susceptibility to country of origin effects has been demonstrated in the past. Formulation of a successful export marketing strategy for Saudi Arabia can be assisted by gaining insight into how the Saudi consumers view a particular “made‐in” label. This study examines Saudi consumers' attitudes toward a “made‐in UK” label. The authors also discuss several strategies that can be used to promote the “made‐in UK” label in Saudi Arabia.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2021

Suad Dukhaykh and Diana Bilimoria

The purpose of this study is to explore the factors that influence Saudi Arabian women to persist in nontraditional work careers, which are primarily in gender-integrated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the factors that influence Saudi Arabian women to persist in nontraditional work careers, which are primarily in gender-integrated work environments and male-dominated industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted based on semistructured interviews with 30 Saudi women – 18 of whom were working in nontraditional careers and 12 of whom had worked in nontraditional careers but subsequently left to pursue more traditional, female-associated career opportunities. Interview data were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using grounded theory methods.

Findings

Distinct similarities and differences between the two subsamples emerged from the data. Similarities between the two groups included men's underestimation of women's performance, lack of access to workplace sites and resources, male colleagues' cultural fears of violating gender norms and social rejection of women in the workplace. Women who persisted in nontraditional work careers articulated a high level of self-efficacy, an optimistic future vision, positive relationships with male colleagues and family support, which enabled them to persevere despite numerous difficulties associated with working in a male-dominated environment. A conceptual model is developed that integrates the findings explaining Saudi women's persistence in nontraditional work careers.

Research limitations/implications

Self-reported data and a small sample size are the main limitations of this study.

Practical implications

Male managers of women in nontraditional work settings are encouraged to engage positively with women professionals in their teams and to provide opportunities for growth and development for all members of the workforce. Saudi public policy decision-makers, families, educators and organizations interested in retaining and increasing female workforce participation should take into account the factors influencing Saudi women's persistence in nontraditional work careers.

Originality/value

Although some studies in Western contexts have addressed the factors that influence the persistence of women in nontraditional careers, less work has been done in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) sociocultural context. Specifically, in the present study, the authors investigate the factors that influence women's persistence in nontraditional careers in Saudi Arabia's high gender-role-oriented culture.

Details

Career Development International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Abdulrahman Basahal, Chris Forde and Robert MacKenzie

The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to understand the degree to which the intended outcomes of Saudi’s Nitaqat labour market policy corresponds to the actual…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to understand the degree to which the intended outcomes of Saudi’s Nitaqat labour market policy corresponds to the actual responses from private companies. Second, to investigate how these gaps between policy intentions and actual outcomes have informed recent changes to Nitaqat policy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a qualitative approach with a case study design and thematic analysis procedures. Data were obtained from the following three sources: semi-structured interviews completed during the early stage of Nitaqat in 2013–2014 with nine policymakers and 44 key stakeholders from six private Saudi companies; policy documents and gray literature on the aims and effects of the Nitaqat program; and available peer-reviewed literature on the subject.

Findings

This paper sets out and analyses the following four main goals of Nitaqat: First, to increase the Saudi national employment rate, second, increase company efficiency, third, improve human resource capabilities, and fourth, increase female labour participation. This paper reveals that although Nitaqat has certainly resulted in a positive change in some of these areas, in other areas, there remain gaps between the intentions and the actual effects of Nitaqat. This paper analyses recent changes to Nitaqat and argues that further changes may be needed to achieve the full goals of Nitaqat.

Originality/value

This paper’s originality lies in its analysis of the aims of labour market policies and organisational responses. It highlights the reasons for disconnections between the policy aims and organisational practices and explores how policymakers react and respond to these implementation gaps.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Ibrahim El-Sayed Ebaid

The purpose of this study is to explore undergraduate accounting students' perceptions and understanding of the concept of sustainable development. Moreover, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore undergraduate accounting students' perceptions and understanding of the concept of sustainable development. Moreover, this study aims to explore students' perceptions of the integration of sustainable development issues in accounting education in Saudi Arabia as an emerging country.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was administered to a sample of accounting students from four Saudi universities. The questionnaire contained five groups of questions aimed at exploring the extent of students' awareness and understanding of the concept of sustainable development, their perceptions of the importance of sustainable development for society, their perceptions of the important role of accounting in sustainable development, their satisfaction with the level of integrating sustainable development issues in accounting education at the present time and their opinions about the appropriate approach to integrate sustainable development issues in accounting education.

Findings

The findings of the study revealed that although most of the students have heard about the concept of sustainable development from the media and perceive the importance of sustainable development for society, they have a low level of understanding of this concept due to the apparent weakness in integrating sustainable development issues in accounting education in Saudi universities. Students were unsatisfied with the sustainable development learning offered by Saudi universities. They also showed a positive attitude toward integrating sustainable development issues in their accounting education. They suggested that the appropriate approach to integrate sustainable development issues in accounting education is to treat these issues in the relevant courses included in their current accounting curricula.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide indications to the administrators of Saudi universities to start developing accounting curriculum to integrate sustainable development issues into accounting education. This will result in an increase in the effectiveness of the role of these universities in achieving the goals of the Saudi Vision 2030.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature concerning how students perceive sustainable development education by focusing on the accounting students in Saudi Arabia as context that has not previously examined.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2021

Mohammed Bajaher, Murya Habbash and Adel Alborr

This paper aims to examine whether board governance mechanisms and ownership structure play a role in foreign investors’ decisions when buying shares in Saudi listed companies

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether board governance mechanisms and ownership structure play a role in foreign investors’ decisions when buying shares in Saudi listed companies

Design/methodology/approach

Foreign investment in the Saudi capital market started in 2015 and reached a peak in 2019, with corporate governance regulations having been updated in 2017. The authors tested the proposed relationships using hand collected data for all Saudi non-financial firms in 2019.

Findings

This study found that it does not play a role in attracting foreign investment in the Saudi capital market. Foreign investors also seem to avoid firms with concentrated ownership that either have high government or director ownership; however, accounting and market variables show significant impact on foreign investors' decisions. The outcomes of this study provide empirical evidence that current foreign investors in the Saudi stock market do not place enough merit on board governance and their investment decisions tend to depend on share performance. Thus, the results show that the current governance changes and capital market regulations in Saudi Arabia may not have been sufficient to stimulate the inflow of institutional foreign investment to the country to date, but rather they have attracted individual retail foreign investors.

Originality/value

This empirical study is one of only a small number of studies to investigate the impact of internal corporate governance on foreign ownership in developing countries and the first in the Saudi context. In fact, most previous governance research in Saudi Arabia focused on how board governance and ownership structure influences firm performance. A review of the prior studies found that only Badawi et al. (2019) examined the determinants of foreign ownership among Saudi listed firms. Thus, the present investigation extends that study by examining the role of board governance in attracting foreign investors.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

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