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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2018

Ravi Shekhar Kumar, Satyabhusan Dash and Naresh K. Malhotra

This study aims to propose and empirically test new improved customer-based brand equity (CBBE) creation framework, which advocates marketing activities create CBBE…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose and empirically test new improved customer-based brand equity (CBBE) creation framework, which advocates marketing activities create CBBE through customer experience (CE). The proposed framework is in contrast to extant literature suggesting marketing activities directly create CBBE.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interviews with patients, followed by interaction with respondents using a structured questionnaire, were used to collect the data.

Findings

The results suggest that CE is the focal mediating variable for the relationship between marketing activities and CBBE. Out of 15 marketing activities, 8 positively impacted CBBE through CE and 2 negatively affected CBBE through CE. Among the remaining five, three had only a direct positive impact on CBBE and two neither directly nor indirectly impacted CBBE.

Research limitations/implications

The effects of only individual marketing activity, and not of the interaction among marketing activities, were assessed.

Practical implications

The study provides insights into the importance of CE in building CBBE for credence-dominant services (e.g. healthcare). This work will help managers in implementing experiential marketing by designing suitable activities for creating service CBBE.

Originality/value

The study outlines service CBBE creation through CE, offering specific insights for the healthcare market.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Naresh Malhotra and Satyabhusan Dash

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Ravi Shekhar Kumar, Satyabhusan Dash and Prem Chandra Purwar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of brand experience on hospital brand equity; also to assess the effects of different brand equity dimensions on overall…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of brand experience on hospital brand equity; also to assess the effects of different brand equity dimensions on overall customer‐based hospital brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

Measurement items for each variable are developed by integrating existing literature and qualitative in‐depth interviews with patients who have either used, or are using hospital services in India. Face‐to‐face interviews with patients were conducted to obtain 902 usable data points. Psychometric properties of the measurement instrument were satisfactory. Data were analyzed using structural equation modelling to test the influences of different dimensions of brand experience on brand equity dimensions and on overall hospital brand equity.

Findings

The study found that brand experience is an important factor influencing hospital brand equity. The study provides evidence that the brand experience dimensions (sensory, affective, behavioural and intellectual) positively influence the five brand equity dimensions (brand awareness, brand association, perceived quality, brand trust and brand loyalty). The study also confirms the influence of brand equity dimensions (brand awareness, brand association, perceived quality, brand trust and brand loyalty) on customer‐based hospital brand equity.

Originality/value

The distinctive contribution of this research is that it examines the effect of brand experience on customer‐based brand equity in the context of a credence‐based service in an emerging economy. Such a work is essential in understanding the importance of experiential marketing in an emerging economy for building a strong service brand.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Joe Choon Yean Chai, Naresh K Malhotra and Satyabhusan Dash

– The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of relational bonding on intention and loyalty and the mediating role of commitment foci in the service context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of relational bonding on intention and loyalty and the mediating role of commitment foci in the service context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a cross-sectional and quantitative mail survey approach. Bank customers in New Zealand were surveyed, and multiple analytical techniques were used to measure the relationships between consumer bonding, commitment foci and loyalty behavioral intentions and the mediating role of commitment foci in service relationships.

Findings

The results confirm that commitment foci or targets of commitment are important mediators in the relationships between bonding and loyalty-related behavioral intentions. The findings provide new theoretical knowledge about the mediating effect of the commitment foci in service relationships and significantly enhance knowledge about consumers’ intention and loyalty.

Practical implications

The research provides several noteworthy insights into the role of social and structural bonding in consumers’ commitment and loyalty in the service context, as well as provides an important implication for segmentation.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the service research on consumers’ intention and loyalty behavior toward the commitment foci. Introducing the role of commitment foci as a mediating mechanism within the context of a service encounter is new in the services marketing literature. This study provides a better understanding of consumers’ perceptions of and behaviors toward the commitment foci, as well as their intention and loyalty.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Shashi Shekhar Mishra and K.B. Saji

The purpose of this paper is first, to identify the institutional variables that influence the technology acquisition intent (TAI) in new high‐tech product development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is first, to identify the institutional variables that influence the technology acquisition intent (TAI) in new high‐tech product development (NPD) process; second, to identify and confirm the consequence of TAI in the Stage‐Gate system of NPD process; and third, to validate the moderating role of Perceived Risk and Project Duration on the “TAI to new product commercialization (NPC) relationship” in the NPD process.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design for this generic study involved two phases: exploratory and descriptive. The theoretical framework emanated from the exploratory phase and is validated by conducting a global survey on 215 high‐tech product marketing firms.

Findings

The institutional variables – Dominant Design and Network Externalities – directly influence a firm's TAI that in turn leads to NPC. While the study confirms that the longer project duration negatively moderates to TAI to NPC relationship, no support was found for the influence of increased risk perception on the same.

Practical implications

The study explains the rationale for marketer's efforts toward dominant design and network externalities. Also, the NPD teams should be cautious about project duration, as uncertainty associated with longer project duration reduces the TAI, and thereby inhibits the successful NPC.

Originality/value

By empirically investigating the influence of institutional variables on a firm's TAI, the study significantly contributes to extant theories on NPD. Also, the study results have significant implications for high‐tech product marketing theory and practice in the context of emerging market economies.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Satyabhusan Dash, Ed Bruning and Kalyan Ku Guin

The purpose of this cross‐cultural study is to examine the moderating effect of power distance on perceived interdependence and relationship quality in a bank‐corporate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this cross‐cultural study is to examine the moderating effect of power distance on perceived interdependence and relationship quality in a bank‐corporate client relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through surveys administered to bank customers in India and Canada. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Multiple Regression were employed to assess the relationships among model variables.

Findings

Results indicate that Power distance moderates the Interdependence and Relationship Quality Relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to only Indian and Canadian customers and their banks. Only one dimension of culture was used as a moderator of the Interdependence and Relationship Quality relationship. The study is limited to a single dimension of service banking.

Practical implications

Buyer‐seller relationships are dependent on the specific cultural basis of the parties. Managers must be cognizant of the cultural values of the buyer/client in order to understand the most effective means of establishing and nurturing the buyer‐seller relationship.

Originality/value

Given that Values, Interdependence, Interdependence Asymmetry, Trust and Commitment are critically important to the development of effective relationships, statistical data are presented supporting the fact that an element of national culture (Power Distance) moderates the degree of interdependence and the strength of the trust‐commitment linkage. To date, these relationships have not been explored in an eastern cultural context.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Suraksha Gupta and Naresh Malhotra

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a model for fostering innovation in marketing by virtue of the competitiveness that is an outcome of the collaboration…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a model for fostering innovation in marketing by virtue of the competitiveness that is an outcome of the collaboration between international and local firms working together in emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the case of an international brand and local firms in an emerging economy to illustrate and support the proposed framework.

Findings

The extant literature on competitiveness advocates the fit between business partners in association based on mutual value creation. This paper adopts a resource‐based view to support this approach. It contributes to knowledge about emerging markets by reflecting on the benefits gained by both international firms and local firms that are based in emerging markets as partners in association for business purposes.

Practical implications

The study draws on managerial practices and existing literature to develop a conceptual framework that explains how a resource‐based association drives individual competitiveness, and how the integration of the competitiveness of both partners facilitates innovation in marketing.

Originality/value

This study uses a resource‐based view to explain the relationship between an international brand and its resellers in emerging markets. It contributes to the business‐to‐business marketing literature that discusses innovation as an important outcome of collaboration between international firms and their local business customer firms in emerging markets.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Satyabhusan Dash, Ed Bruning and Kalyan Ku Guin

The purpose of this paper is to describe a cross‐cultural study which examined individualism's moderating effect on the relationship between bonding and commitment between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a cross‐cultural study which examined individualism's moderating effect on the relationship between bonding and commitment between banks and their corporate clients.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through surveys completed by corporate customers from 126 Canadian companies and 156 Indian companies. Multiple regression analysis was used to calculate relative effects of structural and social bond on commitment across the two samples. Hierarchical moderated regression analysis was used to examine individualism's moderating effect on the bonding‐commitment relationship.

Findings

The paper's findings indicate that social and structural bonding are both antecedent to commitment, but that social bonding is given higher importance in the low individualism Indian society, while structural bonding is more important in the high individualism Canadian society. Individualism moderates the relationship between both social and structural bonding and commitment.

Practical implications

Bank relationships are dependent upon specific cultural contexts in which buyers and sellers interact. The type of bonding relationship (e.g. social or structural) determines the strength of commitment. Bank managers must understand the proper emphasis to place on developing social connections versus business transactional relationships with clients in individualistic versus collective cultures.

Originality/value

This paper dramatizes the importance of understanding ways in which bonding relates to commitment, particularly when societal values vary and thus alter the relative importance of forms of bonding that generate commitment. Through empirical analyses, the paper demonstrates the moderating effect of individualism on the social bonding‐commitment and structural bonding‐commitment linkages in the context of an important service sector. To date, these relationships have not been explored in either the Indian or Canadian context.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Dianne Cyr, Gurprit S. Kindra and Satyabhusan Dash

With the rapid expansion of global online markets including India, researchers and practitioners are challenged to understand drivers of customer satisfaction, trust and…

Abstract

Purpose

With the rapid expansion of global online markets including India, researchers and practitioners are challenged to understand drivers of customer satisfaction, trust and loyalty towards web sites. The paper aims to focus on web site design, which is expected to influence whether customers revisit an online vendor.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants in India evaluated a local and foreign web site of the same online vendor. Surveys and interviews were used to collect the data.

Findings

The results indicate significant preference for the local web site in almost all design categories. Further, the local site instilled greater trust, satisfaction and loyalty. Data collected for this study are compared with parallel work conducted using the same procedures in four other countries.

Research limitations/implications

The current investigation is relevant for researchers who aim to expand knowledge concerning the impact of web site design related to user trust, satisfaction and loyalty. The work also has implications for web designers or managers who seek to enhance the market attraction and retention of online web sites. Limitations of the study are that both the local and foreign web sites used were Samsung web sites and that only a single task (searching for a cell phone) was used.

Originality/value

Few studies have examined web design in relation to user outcomes such as trust, satisfaction and loyalty in international markets.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Satyabhusan Dash, Ed Bruning and Manaswini Acharya

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between Canadian and Indian consumers' national cultural orientations and banking service quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between Canadian and Indian consumers' national cultural orientations and banking service quality expectations. Using two of Hofstede's five cultural dimensions operationalized at the individual level, and five dimensions of service quality from Parasuraman et al.'s SERVQUAL scale, the aim is to develop and test hypotheses relating national culture values to service quality expectations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is quantitative in nature, using surveys (online and written) from respondents in Canada and India. Data were analyzed using dummy variable regression and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results show that the importance of various SERVQUAL dimensions is related to Hofstede's power distance and individualism cultural dimensions both at the individual and national levels. More specifically, consumers low on power distance expect highly responsive and reliable service. High power distance customers attach higher importance to tangible service attributes. Consumers high on individualism expect lower empathy and assurance from service providers. Furthermore, Indian consumers attach higher importance to tangible attributes, whereas Canadian consumers find service reliability more important. However, differences in overall service quality expectations are not significantly different across the two countries.

Practical implications

The results suggest that managers must be aware of the cultural values of the buyer/client in order to fully understand the most effective means of establishing and nurturing the service delivery process and, consequently, establishing service quality expectations. Banks will be more successful when service delivery is in tune with cultural imperatives, particularly sub‐group cultural imperatives.

Originality/value

The study provides an original insight into the manner in which national culture impacts on service quality expectations. Furthermore, the study identifies individual sub‐cultural influences that shape service quality expectations.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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