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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Satya P. Das and Chetan Ghate

373

Abstract

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Satya P. Das

3

Abstract

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Satya P. Das

The purpose of this paper is to develop a political‐economy model to show how political imperatives lead to reforms in administering direct tax collection.

1291

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a political‐economy model to show how political imperatives lead to reforms in administering direct tax collection.

Design/methodology/approach

A static, political‐gain approach was used to model employment in the tax collection sector and then the implications of an increase in revenue pressure were derived through a comparative statics method.

Findings

As revenue pressure increases, the “political value” in terms of granting employment falls and thus efficiency resulting from purely political motives decreases.

Originality/value

This paper is an original work.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Satya P. Das and Anuradha Saha

This paper aims to understand the impact of land acquisition and the provision of rehabilitation and remuneration (R & R) transfers included in it, toward the…

573

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the impact of land acquisition and the provision of rehabilitation and remuneration (R & R) transfers included in it, toward the short-run and the long-run growth of an economy as well as on the welfare of farmers and industrialists over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a two-sector model of growth with agriculture and manufacturing in which land is an essential input to production in both sectors. Industrialists buy land from farmers and deals include R & R payments. Individuals live for one period and at its end, bequeath land and capital assets to their child. There is Hicks-neutral technical progress in each sector.

Findings

The R & R policy has no effect on the long-run sectoral growth or land allocation. While such a policy benefits the farmers initially, after a certain period, it reduces their welfare. The R & R scheme makes the industrialist worse-off in all periods. It was found that besides the standard convergence effect, land acquisition by the industrial sector increases the growth rate of capital. This may lead to non-monotonic growth rate of capital.

Research limitations/implications

The two-sector model abstracts from labor and labor markets. Hence, sectoral employment mobility or changes in the skill-wage premium over time are not captured.

Originality/value

First, this paper developed a two-sector growth model with land as a factor of production and an asset. Second, it examined growth and distributive impacts of the R & R package embodied in land transactions.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

626

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

Margaret Adolphus

331

Abstract

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

461

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

Jaideep Roy and Prabal Roy Chowdhury

In a global environment where terrorist organisations based in a poor country target a rich nation, this paper aims to study the properties of a dynamically incentive…

Abstract

Purpose

In a global environment where terrorist organisations based in a poor country target a rich nation, this paper aims to study the properties of a dynamically incentive compatible contract designed by the target nation that involves joint counter-terror tasks with costly participation by each country. The counter-terror operations are however subject to ex post moral hazard, so that to incentivise counter-terror, the rich country supplies developmental aid. Development aid also helps avoid unrest arising from counter-terror activities in the target nation. However, aid itself can be diverted to non-developmental projects, generating a novel interlinked moral hazard problem spanning both tasks and rewards.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a dynamic model where the aid giving countries and aid receiving countries behave strategically. Then they solve for the sub game perfect Nash equilibrium of this game.

Findings

The authors characterise the optimal contract, showing that the dynamic structure of counter-terror resembles the shock-and-awe discussed by military strategists. The authors then prove that it is not necessarily the case that a more hawkish (resp. altruistic) donor is less pro-development (resp. softer on terror). In addition, the authors show that it may be easier to contract for higher counter-terror inputs when the recipient is more sympathetic to terrorists. The authors also discuss other problems faced by developing nations where this model can be readily adopted and the results can endorse appealing policy implications.

Originality/value

The authors characterise the optimal contract, showing that the dynamic structure of counter-terror resembles the shock-and-awe discussed by military strategists. It is proved that it is not necessarily the case that a more hawkish (resp. altruistic) donor is less pro-development (resp. softer on terror). In addition, the authors show that it may be easier to contract for higher counter-terror inputs when the recipient is more sympathetic to terrorists. Other problems faced by developing nations are also discussed where this model can be readily adopted, and the results can endorse appealing policy implications. These results have important policy implications, in particular in today’s world.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2018

Bhavisha P. Sheth, Satya Ranjan Acharya and S.B. Sareen

Scientific innovation has resulted in the development of newer technologies for the betterment of humankind. Academic and research organizations are the places where these…

Abstract

Purpose

Scientific innovation has resulted in the development of newer technologies for the betterment of humankind. Academic and research organizations are the places where these technologies are actually ideated and/or invented. However, the process of technology transfer and its eventual successful commercialization covers many other facets, in addition to the scientific research alone. This study aims to draw attention towards certain policy gaps and thereby suggest plausible solutions for the improvement of technology transfer process in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

Here, the authors present an extensive Web survey of technologies available for transfer/commercialization in 12 major Indian research organizations, namely, Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), Indian Council of Medical Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Defence Research and Development Organisation, Department of Atomic Energy, Department of Biotechnology, Indian Space Research Organisation, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, IIT Delhi, IIT Kharagpur and IIT Kanpur.

Findings

A total of 2,921 technologies were found to be available with respect to the above-mentioned organizations, with the highest of these in agricultural sciences and the maximum reported by ICAR.

Research limitations/implications

Certain significant policy interventions of this study include the need of a central framework for deposition, management and dissemination of institutionally developed technologies. More attention and support is required for the technologically less developed research areas, and there is a need for the promotion of funding mechanisms for the prototype development, in addition to the already available funding schemes for other stages of technology commercialization.

Practical implications

Hence, the successful commercialization of the innovation from the Indian research labs requires the restructuring of the existing policies to eventually facilitate the economic growth of the nation.

Originality/value

This study discusses the major policy gaps of the Indian technology transfer process. For this, an extensive Web survey was carried out to enlist the various technologies available for transfer and commercialization in India from 12 major research organizations. The study presents the results and some major policy implications of the technology transfer and commercialization process in the Indian context.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

Satya Prasad Padhi

The paper underpins an advanced domestic manufacturing that comes with some advanced employment specialization status of individual industries as the key determinant of…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper underpins an advanced domestic manufacturing that comes with some advanced employment specialization status of individual industries as the key determinant of foreign direct investment (FDI) and considers how FDI in the food processing industry in India relates to this focal point.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates how inward FDI inflows relate to domestic investment and revival in the industry using Auto Regressive Distributed lags (ARDL) model over the period 2000–2017. The model allows for different specifications to study whether FDI is responsible for the revival or the prior revival induces the FDI.

Findings

The results show the lack of proper advanced specialized employment status of the food processing industry. FDI in food processing is mainly guided by exports and imports opportunities and FDI plays no role in the revival of advanced growth in the industry. This finding explains why FDI in the industry is predominantly service sector oriented.

Originality/value

The paper underlines (1) the proper conceptualization of human capital as an important determinant of FDI; (2) reinterpretation of Kaldor's technical progress function that uncovers how employment dynamics embedded in intermediate goods specializations play a key role in supporting a higher pace of investment (and FDI); (3) labor costs' importance should involve not only the wage rate but also the advantages that a specialized employment base and (4) FDI in manufacturing demands a greater policy focus on developing domestic bases of intermediate goods specializations.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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