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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2006

Satish P. Deshpande

The purpose of this paper was to explore various labor relations strategies and tactics used by trucking companies in union elections in the United States. In addition…

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515

Abstract

The purpose of this paper was to explore various labor relations strategies and tactics used by trucking companies in union elections in the United States. In addition, the paper also examined how trucking firms changed their HRM practices after an election. The study, conducted in Summer of 2003, is based on a survey of trucking firms that had a union election between January 2001 and December 2002. Union suppression was the dominant and the most successful labor relations strategy. Some widely used management tactics during an election included hiring a labor lawyer, spreading rumors about job loss, and using a consultant known for breaking unions. After the election, significant increases in many progressive HRM practices were reported in firms regardless of the election outcome. But only firms where unions lost elections reported a significant increase in productivity and service quality. Implications for managers, educators, and union leaders in trucking are discussed.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 16 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2005

Satish P. Deshpande and Jacob Joseph

The objective of this research was to examine factors that impact union elections in the trucking sector. Since trucking firms are labor intensive, unions can have an…

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139

Abstract

The objective of this research was to examine factors that impact union elections in the trucking sector. Since trucking firms are labor intensive, unions can have an impact on the cost of doing business and competitiveness. One hundred and ninety‐nine union elections conducted by the National Labor Relations Board in trucking firms between January 2001 and December 2002 were examined. Type of union, size of bargaining unit, election delays, and voter turnout significantly impacted union win rates. Type of election, type of state, and type of bargaining unit did not impact union win rates. Implications for managers, educators, and union leaders in trucking are discussed.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Satish P. Deshpande, Jacob Joseph and Xiaonan Shu

This study examines the impact of perceived emotional intelligence of 118 Chinese respondents on perceived ethicality of various counter productive behaviours. Respondents…

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2680

Abstract

This study examines the impact of perceived emotional intelligence of 118 Chinese respondents on perceived ethicality of various counter productive behaviours. Respondents in the high emotional intelligence group perceived 6 of the 16 items to be more unethical than the low emotional intelligence group. There was a significant difference in aggregate counter productive behaviours between high and low groupings of three (self‐regulation, social awareness, and social skills) of the five facets of emotional intelligence and over all emotional intelligence. There was no significant difference in over all counter productive behaviour between the student and manager sub‐samples. Implications of the study are discussed.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Satish P. Deshpande and Jennifer Palthe

To examine union elections conducted by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in warehouse and storage facilities in the USA.

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740

Abstract

Purpose

To examine union elections conducted by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in warehouse and storage facilities in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on all 167 elections (October 1999 and February 2002) held in warehouse and storage facilities in the USA was obtained from the NLRB. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to study the impact of a number of factors on election outcomes.

Findings

The probability of union victory significantly improved in smaller bargaining units and when more than one union was on the ballot. Type of warehouse, type of election, procedural delays by management, and state's public policy did not significantly impact election outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The data are limited to union elections held during the period October 1999‐February 2002.

Practical implications

A very useful source of information for managers, union leaders, and researchers of warehouses and storage facilities.

Originality/value

This is the only study of its kind in the period covered.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Satish P. Deshpande and Claudio Milman

Surveys 200 Malaysian students at a US midwestern university to investigate attitudes towards corporate social responsibility. Refers to previous studies exploring the…

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5467

Abstract

Surveys 200 Malaysian students at a US midwestern university to investigate attitudes towards corporate social responsibility. Refers to previous studies exploring the link between corporate social responsibility and financial performance but asserts that there is little empirical evidence on corporate social responsibility and employee attitudes – hence this study. Describes how the survey was carried out (a questionnaire measured on a four‐point Likert scale). Uses t‐tests to evaluate the data. Aims particularly to establish whether or not individuals who value corporate social responsibility exhibit less tolerance of 17 identified counter productive behaviours (such as using organizational services for personal use, padding expense accounts and pilfering organizational supplies). Finds support for the notion that individuals who value corporate social responsibility rate the 17 behaviours as more unethical than individuals who do not especially value corporate social responsibility. Indicates, therefore, that these (more ethical) individuals are less likely to indulge in counter productive behaviour. Recommends ways to back up and extend this research.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Chockalingam Viswesvaran and Satish P. Deshpande

Investigates perceived ethical behaviour by surveying 150 Indian managers, recognizing that perceived ethicality of behaviour differs depending on an individual’s life…

Abstract

Investigates perceived ethical behaviour by surveying 150 Indian managers, recognizing that perceived ethicality of behaviour differs depending on an individual’s life experience and developed values. Hypothesizes that people over 40, women, and more highly educated people will interpret ethical business practice more stringently. Records the methodology used, including the demographic breakdown of the sample group. Uses Likert scales and t‐tests to assess the data. Finds significant gender, age and educational differences in perceived ethical behaviour. Recommends further research into the influence of other variables and wonders if national differences – this study was one of a very few that did not use Norther American samples – accounts for or affects ethical perceptions.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Damodar Y. Golhar, Satish P. Deshpande and Sanjay L. Ahire

In the total quality management (TQM) environment, a major responsibility of TQM implementation rests with supervisors who translate the top management strategies into…

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1308

Abstract

In the total quality management (TQM) environment, a major responsibility of TQM implementation rests with supervisors who translate the top management strategies into short‐term execution. Hence, the role of supervisors in the quality improvement efforts warrants a serious examination. Presents a comparison of the roles of supervisors in quality improvement strategies in TQM and non‐TQM firms. Based on a survey of 232 manufacturing firms in the USA and Canada, analyses the role of supervisors in TQM and non‐TQM firms using eight quality constructs. Major results indicate that, as compared with non‐TQM firms, supervisors in TQM firms receive more support and encouragement from top management, are under less tension, and possess a higher level of satisfaction. Also, participation of supervisors in the firm’s quality efforts is higher in TQM firms. The higher level of supervisors’ involvement, coupled with the top management commitment, results in higher quality of manufacturing processes and products for TQM firms than non‐TQM firms. Further, when implementing TQM strategies, non‐unionized firms are found to provide a better work environment for supervisors than the unionized firms.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Damodar Y. Golhar and Satish P. Deshpande

This empirical study investigates productivity performance of Canadian (n = 43) and US (n = 95) manufacturers in the automotive parts industry (SIC 3714) that have…

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786

Abstract

This empirical study investigates productivity performance of Canadian (n = 43) and US (n = 95) manufacturers in the automotive parts industry (SIC 3714) that have implemented the total quality management (TQM) philosophy. We identify three different categories of productivity measures: financial, customer related, and internal business related. TQM firms indicate improved performance on various productivity measures. Statistically significant differences exist between the two countries on some of the measures. The correlation analysis suggests that, to be customer oriented, a TQM firm must focus on improving internal business processes. Unlike the US sample, the Canadian sample did not show a significant positive correlation between financial measures, and the customer oriented or internal business related measures.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Jessica Mesmer-Magnus, Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Jacob Joseph and Satish P. Deshpande

Emotional intelligence (EI) is thought to offer significant benefit to organizational productivity through enhanced employee performance and satisfaction, decreased…

Abstract

Emotional intelligence (EI) is thought to offer significant benefit to organizational productivity through enhanced employee performance and satisfaction, decreased burnout, and better teamwork. EI may also have implications for the incidence of counterproductive workplace behavior. Survey results suggest EI is a significant predictor of individuals’ ethicality and their perceptions of others’ ethicality. Further, EI explains incremental variance in perceptions of others’ ethics over and above that which is explained by individual ethicality. High EI employees may be more adept at interpreting the ethicality of others’ actions, which has positive implications for ethical decision-making. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Abstract

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

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