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Article

Jane Farmer, Tracy De Cotta, Katharine McKinnon, Jo Barraket, Sarah-Anne Munoz, Heather Douglas and Michael J. Roy

This paper aims to explore the well-being impacts of social enterprise, beyond a social enterprise per se, in everyday community life.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the well-being impacts of social enterprise, beyond a social enterprise per se, in everyday community life.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory case study was used. The study’s underpinning theory is from relational geography, including Spaces of Wellbeing Theory and therapeutic assemblage. These theories underpin data collection methods. Nine social enterprise participants were engaged in mental mapping and walking interviews. Four other informants with “boundary-spanning” roles involving knowledge of the social enterprise and the community were interviewed. Data were managed using NVivo, and analysed thematically.

Findings

Well-being realised from “being inside” a social enterprise organisation was further developed for participants, in the community, through positive interactions with people, material objects, stories and performances of well-being that occurred in everyday community life. Boundary spanning community members had roles in referring participants to social enterprise, mediating between participants and structures of community life and normalising social enterprise in the community. They also gained benefit from social enterprise involvement.

Originality/value

This paper uses relational geography and aligned methods to reveal the intricate connections between social enterprise and well-being realisation in community life. There is potential to pursue this research on a larger scale to provide needed evidence about how well-being is realised in social enterprises and then extends into communities.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Article

Sarah-Anne Munoz

Current policy context in the UK promotes the “co-production” of health and care services – with service users and providers working in partnership. However, the…

Abstract

Purpose

Current policy context in the UK promotes the “co-production” of health and care services – with service users and providers working in partnership. However, the assumption that all individuals and communities have the personal resources, skills and willingness to get involved in co-produced services may have implications for social and geographical equity of access to health and care services. The paper presents the results of a nine-month action research project with a remote and rural community in Scotland to discuss the implications of co-produced health and care services for remote and rural community members – particularly those with ageing populations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research project worked with community members, health care providers and commissioners to develop a community social enterprise model for home care delivery. Textual resources collected during this action research process were subject to thematic analysis in order to explore community perceptions and experiences of service co-production development in the remote and rural context.

Findings

The qualitative analysis showed that community members identified some positive aspects of being involved in service co-production relating to sense of community, empowerment and personal satisfaction. However, negative impacts included increased feelings of pressure, strain and frustration among those who took part in the co-production process. Overall, the community was reluctant to engage with “transformative” co-production and traditional provider-user dynamics were maintained.

Originality/value

The example is used to demonstrate the types of resources that rural individuals and communities draw on in order to create social enterprises and how the potentially negative impacts of co-produced services for different types of social and geographical community may be overlooked in contemporary policy and practice.

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Article

Sarah‐Anne Muñoz

Research on social enterprise and social entrepreneurship has sought to examine the role that can be played by selling to the public sector in the generation of social…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on social enterprise and social entrepreneurship has sought to examine the role that can be played by selling to the public sector in the generation of social enterprises' traded income. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the perceived barriers to engaging in a procurement relationship from the point of view of social enterprise practitioners and public sector procurement professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper stems from focus group work carried out during 2007 with social enterprise practitioners and public sector procurement professionals.

Findings

The analysis of these “voices” demonstrates the progress that has been made in various parts of the UK towards a procurement relationship between the public sector and the social enterprise sector that is more mutually beneficial. However, it also permits reflection on the barriers and challenges that still remain for social enterprises that wish to sell to the public sector.

Originality/value

This paper, therefore, highlights the key areas of support that are needed by both sides in order to create a more productive two‐way relationship. In turn, this allows the paper to reflect on how future research into this topic can support action “on the ground”.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Article

Sarah-Anne Munoz, Jane Farmer, Rachel Winterton and Jo Barraket

The purpose of this paper is to present an Australian case study and to explore how social enterprises may be conceptualised as spaces of well-being, that is the ways in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an Australian case study and to explore how social enterprises may be conceptualised as spaces of well-being, that is the ways in which social enterprises, not explicitly delivering health services, may be producing health and well-being benefits for those who come into contact with them.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study in Australia is used to explore in depth the mechanisms of well-being production. Data were collected using ethnographic observation, focus groups and walking interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis, GIS and the lens of therapeutic assemblage.

Findings

The case study social enterprise produces well-being as integration, capability, security and therapy. The social enterprise acts as a therapeutic assemblage with well-being “spoken”, “practiced” and “felt” within the social enterprise. The ways in which well-being is generated are often linked to the productive element of enterprise – and have the potential to contribute to tackling several contemporary health challenges and inequalities relating to, for example, a lack of physical activity and levels of social isolation.

Research limitations/implications

This paper draws on a single Australian case study but points to the need for further in-depth work in the area of social enterprise and health.

Originality/value

The paper advances our understanding of how social enterprises may be linked to health and well-being. It goes beyond quantification of, for example, number of clients helped, to consider the wider experience of well-being for those who come into contact with social enterprises.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Content available
Article

Bob Doherty

Abstract

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Content available

Abstract

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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