Search results

1 – 10 of 376
Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Sarah Stewart-Brown

Downloads
145

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Sarah Stewart-Brown, Mizaya Cader, Thomas Walker, Sabah Janjua, Emma Hanson and Anne-Marie Chilton

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evaluation of a universal, mental well-being and mindfulness programme in a UK graduate entry medical school.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evaluation of a universal, mental well-being and mindfulness programme in a UK graduate entry medical school.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods used in the paper were the measurement of mental well-being and mindfulness in two cohorts at three time points over 15 months; descriptive, regression and repeated measures analysis with post hoc pairwise comparisons; qualitative interviews with purposive sample of 13 students after one year analysed thematically; and spontaneous anonymous feedback on the course.

Findings

The course was a surprise to students, and reactions were mixed. Respect for its contents grew over the first year. Most students had actively implemented a well-being strategy by the end of the course, and an estimated quarter was practicing some mindful activity. In the context of an overall decline in well-being and limited engagement with mindfulness practice, increases in mindfulness were protective against this decline in both cohorts (p<001). A small minority of students thought that the course was a waste of time. Their attitudes influenced engagement by their peers. The mindfulness and well-being practices of the facilitators were evident to students and influenced perceived effects.

Research limitations/implications

The uncontrolled nature of this observational study and low response rates to the survey limit conclusions. Further research in other medical education settings is needed.

Practical implications

Results are encouraging, suggesting modest benefit in terms of changing attitudes and practices and a modest protective effect on the well-being of students who engaged.

Originality/value

This is the first study of a universal well-being and mindfulness programme in a UK medical school. Universal programmes are rare and evaluation studies are scarce.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Jane Wells, Jane Barlow and Sarah Stewart‐Brown

Reviews previous studies of the universal approach to mental health promotion, and disease prevention programmes or interventions in schools. Over 8,000 publications were…

Downloads
12081

Abstract

Reviews previous studies of the universal approach to mental health promotion, and disease prevention programmes or interventions in schools. Over 8,000 publications were identified initially and 425 studies obtained for further review. The inclusion criteria were met by 17 (mostly US) studies investigating 16 interventions. Positive evidence of effectiveness was obtained for programmes that adopted a whole‐school approach, were implemented continuously for more than a year, and were aimed at the promotion of mental health as opposed to the prevention of mental illness. Provides evidence that universal school mental health promotion programmes can be effective and suggests that long‐term interventions promoting the positive mental health of all pupils and involving changes to the school climate are likely to be more successful than brief class‐based mental illness prevention programmes.

Details

Health Education, vol. 103 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Ruth Tennant, Cristina Goens, Jane Barlow, Crispin Day and Sarah Stewart‐Brown

There is a growing policy imperative to promote positive mental health as well as prevent the development of mental health problems in children. This paper summarises the…

Abstract

There is a growing policy imperative to promote positive mental health as well as prevent the development of mental health problems in children. This paper summarises the findings of published systematic reviews evaluating such interventions. A search was undertaken of ten electronic databases using a combination of medical subject headings (MeSH) and free text searches. Systematic reviews covering mental health promotion or mental illness prevention interventions aimed at infants, children or young people up to age 19 were included. Reviews of drug and alcohol prevention programmes and programmes to prevent childhood abuse and neglect were excluded because these have been the subject of recent good quality reviews of reviews. A total of 27 systematic reviews were included. These targeted a range of risk and protective factors, and a range of populations (including parents and children). While many lacked methodological rigour, overall the evidence is strongly suggestive of the effectiveness of a range of interventions in promoting positive mental well‐being, and reducing key risk factors for mental illness in children. Based on this evidence, arguments are advanced for the preferential provision of early preventive programmes.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Sarah Stewart‐Brown

This paper reviews current evidence of the significance of interpersonal relationships ‐ at community, workplace, school and family levels ‐ in influencing mental health…

Abstract

This paper reviews current evidence of the significance of interpersonal relationships ‐ at community, workplace, school and family levels ‐ in influencing mental health and well‐being. It argues that the parent‐child relationship is of pre‐eminent importance both because of its direct effect on future mental health and because it sets the scene for future relationships. It also argues that, because of the reciprocal nature of the relationships, the mental health of society can be improved by improving the mental health of any of its individual members. From this it follows that to focus mental health promotion programmes entirely on the most vulnerable limits the potential for improvement, because working with people who are not mentally ill will increase their ability to support those who are. Universal mental health promotion programmes should therefore have relationships ‐ and parent‐child relationships in particular ‐ at their heart, aiming to improve everyone's capacity to relate supportively and respectfully to others.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Sarah Stewart‐Brown

The paper's purpose is to participate in a debate about the role of randomised controlled trials in evaluation of preventive interventions for children.

Downloads
133

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's purpose is to participate in a debate about the role of randomised controlled trials in evaluation of preventive interventions for children.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a response to critiques on Stewart‐Brown et al. published in the Journal of Children's Services, Vol. 6 No. 4, pp. 228–35.

Findings

Randomised controlled trials are likely to be at their best in the evaluation of interventions that do not require the active engagement and personal development of participants. The latter may depend on a series of interventions and events that potentiate each other over time. Randomised controlled trials are likely to be least valuable in evaluating universal level interventions that aim to change population norms. Because of the challenges involved in conducting RCTs in this setting they cannot be relied upon to give accurate estimates of programme effect and therefore do not deserve the privileged position that has been accorded them in the hierarchy of evidence.

Originality/value

This paper develops the argument that the privileged position of RCTs in the evidence hierarchy of preventive services for children is undeserved.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Jane Barlow, Doug Simkiss and Sarah Stewart‐Brown

The aim of this article is to summarise the available evidence from systematic reviews about the effectiveness of interventions to prevent or treat child physical abuse…

Abstract

The aim of this article is to summarise the available evidence from systematic reviews about the effectiveness of interventions to prevent or treat child physical abuse and neglect. A computerised search was undertaken of major electronic databases up to December 2005 using key search terms. Only systematic reviews were included in which the primary studies evaluated the effectiveness of targeted or indicated interventions for child physical abuse or neglect. A total of 31 systematic reviews were identified and 15 met all the inclusion criteria. They covered a range of interventions/services, including home visiting, parenting programmes, multi‐component interventions, intensive family preservation services, family‐focused casework and multi‐systemic family therapy. There was limited evidence of the effectiveness of services in improving objective measures of abuse and neglect, due in part to methodological issues involved in their measurement, but good evidence of modest benefits in improving a range of outcomes that are associated with physical abuse and neglect, including parental and family functioning and child development. The results also showed some interventions (eg. media‐based and perinatal coaching) to be ineffective with high‐risk families. The evidence provided by these reviews has clear implications for children's services in the UK and other western developed countries.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Michael Little and Nick Axford

Downloads
184

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Michael Little and Nick Axford

Downloads
406

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Sarah Stewart‐Brown, Rebecca Anthony, Lynsey Wilson, Sarah Winstanley, Nigel Stallard, Helen Snooks and Douglas Simkiss

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have been offered a privileged position in terms of the evidence base for preventive interventions for children, but practical and…

Downloads
550

Abstract

Purpose

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have been offered a privileged position in terms of the evidence base for preventive interventions for children, but practical and theoretical issues challenge this research methodology. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses practical and methodological issues of using RCTs within children's preventive services and presents the results of a qualitative study using data collected from parents who were asked to take part in an RCT of a preventive intervention.

Findings

Well recognised issues include the impossibility of blinding participants, the problem of identifying a pre‐eminent outcome measure for complex interventions, and problems with limiting access to equivalent interventions in real world settings. A further theoretical problem is the exclusion from RCTs of families who are most ready to change, resulting in a reduced level of intervention effectiveness. Qualitative evidence from one recent RCT suggests that this problem could be operating in some prevention trials. Increasing sample sizes can overcome some of these problems, but the cost of the necessarily huge trials becomes disproportionate to the intervention?

Originality/value

Given the limitations on RCTs in preventive settings, the paper argues their privileged position in terms of research evidence maybe undeserved.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

1 – 10 of 376