Search results

1 – 10 of 639
Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Sarah Lewis

Downloads
499

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Ruth Lewis-Morton, Sarah Harding, April Lloyd, Alison Macleod, Simon Burton and Lee James

The purpose of this paper is to explore the process of co-producing a formulation alongside a service user and the clinical team within a secure inpatient service. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the process of co-producing a formulation alongside a service user and the clinical team within a secure inpatient service. This paper has been co-authored by the service user and members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT).

Design/methodology/approach

An open-ended focus group discussion was facilitated with the service user and members of her MDT. The process of thematic analysis was applied to the focus group transcript.

Findings

The following themes highlighted important outcomes of co-producing a formulation within a secure inpatient setting; “Meaningful Collaboration”, “Co-Produced Understanding” and a “Shift in Power Differential”. This paper demonstrates the importance of meaningful co-production within a secure inpatient service whilst also highlighting the challenges and tensions of working in a co-produced way within this context.

Research limitations/implications

This paper explores the process of co-producing and developing a formulation from the perspective of one service user and their MDT within a secure inpatient setting. It would be unhelpful to extrapolate broad assumptions from this case study although this study does raise important considerations for future research and encourages an emphasis on a co-produced design and dissemination.

Practical implications

This case study highlights the importance of co-production in clinical endeavours, service delivery and development perspectives and in the dissemination of this information.

Originality/value

The importance of co-producing and co-authoring alongside service users have been highlighted in this paper. This approach to co-production and co-authorship is highly recommended in future research endeavours.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

James Lewis and Sarah A.V. Lewis

The purpose of this paper is to emphasise how vulnerability is not only “place-based” and to explore by example how vulnerability to hazards in England may comprise…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasise how vulnerability is not only “place-based” and to explore by example how vulnerability to hazards in England may comprise additional economic, social and psychological contributors to poverty. The mutuality of poverty and vulnerability is demonstrated, as are examples of susceptibility of the vulnerable to stigmatic disregard and cruelty.

Design/methodology/approach

“Place-based” vulnerability is exemplified by coastal vulnerabilities and causes of their increase. Poverty and its causes are explained, followed by examples of possible contributors, indicators and consequences in incomes, living costs and debt; housing welfare and homelessness; food, nutrition, health and mental ill-health. Susceptibility to stigmatic behaviours exacerbate personal vulnerabilities.

Findings

Dynamics of mutual inter-relationships between poverty and vulnerability are demonstrated. Behavioural responses to either condition by individuals and by society at large, to which those who are vulnerable or in poverty are susceptible, are described in the present and from history.

Research limitations/implications

Findings form a “theoretical reality” upon which some measures may follow. An additional need is identified for long-term social field research to follow adults’ and childrens’ experiences, and consequences of poverty in vulnerable situations.

Practical implications

Vulnerability accrues irrevocably between disasters, the results of which may be exposed by disaster impacts.

Social implications

Recognition of linkages between economic and social vulnerability and disasters is essential for subsequent action to reduce the impact of disasters upon society.

Originality/value

Though vulnerability has been explored for many years, the dynamics of its contributing processes require further explanation before their wider comprehension is achieved.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Sarah Lewis

The purposes of this paper are: to view the credit crunch as a decline in certainty and predictability in the world at present, and to examine the challenge this decline

Downloads
1711

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper are: to view the credit crunch as a decline in certainty and predictability in the world at present, and to examine the challenge this decline presents to leaders, to identify leadership errors that can occur, and to suggest successful leadership strategies relevant to the current challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first explains Taleb's analysis of the effect of unpredictable events and then identifies both common errors and helpful strategies of leadership, giving examples.

Findings

It is found that the recent changes in the commercial and financial world, the credit crunch, create considerable leadership challenges. It is also shown that there are things leaders can do to increase or maintain their effectiveness as leaders and there are methodologies they can employ with their organisation to increase the organisation's effectiveness in the face of unfolding uncertainty.

Practical implications

The paper gives clear guidance both on the approach leaders would be wise to avoid and a helpful approach to offering leadership in times of uncertainty.

Originality/value

Taleb's work offers a unique and timely way of understanding how unhelpful behaviour can occur when conditions change suddenly or unpredictably. The paper draws out the implications of his philosophical and intriguing work in a pragmatic, practical, way to make clear its relevance to leadership during the credit crunch.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Sarah Lewis, Jonathan Passmore and Stefan Cantore

The purpose of this paper is to explain the appreciative inquiry change methodology and to demonstrate how it can be applied to a specific work challenge.

Downloads
1716

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the appreciative inquiry change methodology and to demonstrate how it can be applied to a specific work challenge.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first explains the appreciative inquiry method and gives an account of how the approach was applied to a sales team development event.

Findings

Appreciative inquiry is a change approach that is growing in popularity. This paper demonstrates the flexibility of this approach within the context of change and development. In the case study under examination the incorporation of appreciative inquiry based practice enhanced both the development experience and post event performance.

Practical implications

This paper gives clear guidance on the basic model of appreciative inquiry and how it can be practically employed in a familiar context.

Originality/value

Appreciative inquiry offers an alternative approach to organisational development to either personality based or problem solving based development. By calling on the human facilities of imagination, emotion, conversation, engagement, orientation, and self‐direction it offers a truly psychological approach to human group development

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Sarah Lewis, Craig A. White and Liam Dorris

The purpose of this article is to identify the range of psychosocial care components used by a multidisciplinary breast cancer team.

Downloads
952

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to identify the range of psychosocial care components used by a multidisciplinary breast cancer team.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed to assess the range of psychosocial care components used by the team, their confidence using them and their training needs in relation to them. A total of 15 people completed the questionnaire from seven different professions.

Findings

The breast cancer team carried out a wide range of psychosocial care components despite little formal training to support their work. They valued the importance of psychosocial interventions and recognised their learning needs in relation to them.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size limited ability to detect correlations and significant trends within the data. Future research could sample other cancer teams and use the questionnaire before and after training to detect changes in the use of psychosocial care components.

Practical implications

The psychosocial needs of cancer patients are best met when all members of the team are aware of and respond to those needs. This study suggests that team members' confidence in using psychosocial care components should be regularly assessed and training provided. It is proposed that a questionnaire is a valuable way of gathering information and evaluating training.

Originality/value

This paper would be of value to a manager or clinician aiming to develop a multidisciplinary approach to the psychosocial care of cancer patients.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Trevor Hassall, Alex Dunlop and Sarah Lewis

Examines the nature of professional competence, using the field of Internal Audit as an exemplar. Attempts to describe the professionalization process and thus the context…

Downloads
2362

Abstract

Examines the nature of professional competence, using the field of Internal Audit as an exemplar. Attempts to describe the professionalization process and thus the context in which the concept is normally encountered. Reviews the nature and influence of pressures for change currently affecting the Internal Audit profession. Examines the differing approaches to the definition and interpretation of professional competence, including the consideration of the factors which underpin it and the role therein played by knowledge. Considers current UK and US proposals and developments in Internal Auditor education in the light of conclusions drawn from the preceding sections. Concludes that it is likely that a major influential role will be played by current developments in NVQ methodology and that, at least in the short term, a case study approach to teaching and assessment would be beneficial. It further posits that there will be, in all probability, a major role to be played in the future by formally structured workplace based competence led assessment.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

Sarah Lewis, Joan Bloom, Jennifer Rice, Arash Naeim and Stephen Shortell

This study sought to identify the organizational factors associated with team and network effectiveness of the Athena Breast Health Network, a multi-site collaboration…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to identify the organizational factors associated with team and network effectiveness of the Athena Breast Health Network, a multi-site collaboration between five University of California health systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Providers, managers, and support staff completed self-administered surveys over three years. Statistical analyses at the network and medical center levels tested hypotheses regarding the correlates of effective teams and perceived network effectiveness over time.

Findings

Perceived team effectiveness was positively correlated with group culture and environments which support collaboration, negatively correlated with hierarchical culture, and negatively associated with professional tenure at year two. As measured by increasing team effectiveness scores over time and Athena’s potential impact on patient care, perceived network effectiveness was positively associated with team effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

Results do not allow us to conclude that a certain type of culture “causes” team effectiveness or that team effectiveness “causes” greater perceptions of progress over time. Subsequent studies should examine these variables simultaneously. Further research is needed to examine the role of payment incentives, internal reward systems, the use of electronic health records, public disclosure of performance data, and depth of leadership within each organization and within the network overall.

Practical implications

Focusing on group affiliation and participation may improve team member perceptions regarding effectiveness and impact on patient care.

Originality/value

Relatively little is known about the adaptive processes that occur within inter-organizational networks to achieve desired goals, and particularly the roles played by multi-disciplinary inter-professional teams. We studied a network comprising multiple campuses actively involved in better understanding, preventing, and treating a complex disease.

Details

Population Health Management in Health Care Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-197-8

Keywords

1 – 10 of 639