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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Meredith Gresham, Liz Taylor, Sarah Keyes, Heather Wilkinson, Danielle McIntosh and Colm Cunningham

The purpose of this paper is to to describe development of a framework for use in the evaluation of the effectiveness of signage to assist people with dementia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to to describe development of a framework for use in the evaluation of the effectiveness of signage to assist people with dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study consisted of two parts. Workshops held in both Sydney and Edinburgh using “world café” methodology with 28 knowledgeable participants produced a pool of statements. These were subsequently used in a three-round Delphi process administered to 38 participants in order to generate ideas and develop consensus content for a signage evaluation framework.

Findings

This process resulted in a framework consisting of Delphi statements which had a 70 per cent level of agreement and a series of prompt questions. Both intrinsic factors and wider environmental, extrinsic factors in signage for wayfinding were identified.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study were the small number of participants, including only four people with dementia, and the unresolved problems inherent in designing signage that may simultaneously be universally relevant and readily understood, yet meets the idiosyncratic needs of each individual living with dementia.

Originality/value

As there is little prior work in this field concerning signage use by people with dementia, this framework provides an original preliminary tool that may be used in further research on evaluating signage effectiveness. In designing signage and testing its effectiveness, it was concluded that the direct involvement of people with dementia is essential.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Rebecca Drill, Johanna Malone, Meredith Flouton-Barnes, Laura Cotton, Sarah Keyes, Rachel Wasserman, Kelly Wilson, Monica Young, Holly Laws and Jack Beinashowitz

The purpose of this paper is to address the barrier to care experienced by LGBTQIA+ populations by binary language for gender, sexual orientation and relationship status.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the barrier to care experienced by LGBTQIA+ populations by binary language for gender, sexual orientation and relationship status.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the research that shows linguistic barriers are a significant obstacle to healthcare for LGBTQIA+ communities. The authors describe both a process and revisions for addressing language bias in psychiatric intake/research research materials as well as quantify its impact in an adult psychotherapy clinic in a public hospital.

Findings

Patients self-identified their gender, sexual orientation and relationship status in a variety of ways when not presented with binaries and/or pre-established response choices. In addition, the non-response rate to questions decreased and the authors received positive qualitative feedback. The authors also present the revisions to the intake/research materials.

Practical implications

Other healthcare settings/clinicians can revise language in order to remove significant barriers to treatment and in doing so, be welcoming, non-pathologizing and empowering for LGBTQIA+ consumers of mental health services (as well as for non-LGBTQIA+ consumers who are in non-traditional relationships).

Social implications

This work is one step in improving healthcare and the healthcare experience for LGBTQIA+ communities and for those in non-traditional relationships.

Originality/value

This work is set in a public safety-net hospital providing care for underserved and diverse populations. This paper describes the process of revising psychiatric materials to be more inclusive of the range of self-identity are: gender, sexual orientation and relationship status.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2020

Rosie Elizabeth Allen, Jerome Carson, Bethany Merrifield and Stacey Bush

The purpose of this paper is to compare a group of service users with mental health problems with a community comparison group of gym attenders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare a group of service users with mental health problems with a community comparison group of gym attenders.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional questionnaire surveys were conducted at a large gym (n = 181) and two community mental health facilities (n = 127) in the Greater Manchester area using a convenience sample approach. All participants completed the PERMA Scale, a measure of flourishing.

Findings

Gym attenders scored significantly higher on the five elements of PERMA. Their physical health ratings were almost double. They also had significantly lower levels of negative emotions and loneliness and higher levels of overall happiness.

Research limitations/implications

This study only considered levels of flourishing. Previous studies of quality of life have shown similar disparities between people with mental health problems and others.

Practical implications

Professor Seligman has claimed that improving levels of flourishing is the main aim of positive psychology. The present study suggests this may be especially challenging for people with mental health problems.

Social implications

The concept of flourishing could provide a more positive non-medical focus for mental health services, in the development of what some have called positive psychiatry. This complements the current recovery model.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first studies to compare flourishing levels between individuals with mental health problems and a community comparison group using the PERMA Scale.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Sunil Chopra and Murali Veeraiyan

Jim Keyes, CEO of Dallas-based Blockbuster Inc., was facing the biggest challenge of his career. In March 2010 Keyes was meeting with Hollywood studios in an effort to negotiate…

Abstract

Jim Keyes, CEO of Dallas-based Blockbuster Inc., was facing the biggest challenge of his career. In March 2010 Keyes was meeting with Hollywood studios in an effort to negotiate better terms for the $1 billion worth of merchandise Blockbuster had purchased the year before. In recent years, Blockbuster's share of the video rental market had been sharply decreasing in the face of competitors such as the low-cost, convenient Redbox vending machines and mail-order and video-on-demand service Netflix. While Blockbuster's market capitalization had dropped 47 percent to $62 million in 2009, Netflix's had shot up 55 percent to $3.9 billion that year. The only hope for Blockbuster, as Keyes saw it, was to shift its business model from primarily brick-and-mortar physical DVD rentals to increased digital and mail-order video delivery. In Keyes's favor, the studios were more than willing to provide him with that help. Hollywood wanted to see Blockbuster win the video-rental wars. Consumers still made frequent purchases of DVDs at its store—purchases which were much more profitable for studios than the rentals that remained Blockbuster's primary business. Blockbuster had made efforts at making its business model more nimble, but the results had been disappointing, and its debt continued to skyrocket. By the end of 2009, the company's debt had climbed to $856 million, its share of the $6.5 billion video rental business had fallen to 27 percent, and its revenues had tumbled 23 percent to $4.1 billion.

The objective of this case is to discuss how different business models and supply chain structures impact the financials of the firms in the DVD rental business. In particular, the goal is to convey that the characteristics of the movie (recent/big hit or old/eclectic) affect whether it is best rented from a centralized or decentralized model. In addition, as streaming gains market share, the impact will be different for movie types and business models.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Line Nielsen, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Mathilde Vinther-Larsen, Charlotte Meilstrup, Bjørn E. Holstein and Vibeke Koushede

It is important within public health goals to promote adolescents’ mental health and to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in mental health. Among adults there are indications that…

Abstract

Purpose

It is important within public health goals to promote adolescents’ mental health and to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in mental health. Among adults there are indications that the socioeconomic pattern of low positive mental health (PMH) differs from the socioeconomic pattern of high PMH. Knowledge regarding the social epidemiology of PMH among young people is lacking. The purpose of this paper is to examine the socioeconomic patterning of aspects of low and high PMH among adolescents.

Design/methodology/approach

The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Methodology Development Study 2012 provided data on 3,670 adolescents aged 11-15 in two municipalities in Denmark. Socioeconomic differences in aspects of low and high PMH (self-esteem, social competence and self-efficacy) were investigated by calculating sex-specific prevalence of PMH in socioeconomic groups measured by parents’ occupational social class. Using multi-level logistic regression analyses, odds ratios for low and high PMH compared to moderate PMH were estimated.

Findings

In age-adjusted analyses there seemed to be a graded relationship with increasing odds for low PMH with decreasing socioeconomic position, but no indication of a socioeconomic patterning of high PMH. The prevalence of high self-esteem and high self-efficacy was higher among boys than girls. High social competence and high self-efficacy increased with age.

Research limitations/implications

Public health research has primarily focused on risk factors and mental health problems. Research highlighting more detailed aspects of PMH is needed.

Originality/value

The socioeconomic pattern of high PMH may be different from the socioeconomic pattern of low PMH.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2024

Emily Bouck, Larissa Jakubow and Sarah Reiley

This chapter sought to answer the following questions: (a) what does special education means for students with intellectual disability?, (b) what is being done, and (c) how do we…

Abstract

This chapter sought to answer the following questions: (a) what does special education means for students with intellectual disability?, (b) what is being done, and (c) how do we maintain tradition? The answers, while complicated, suggest special education for students with intellectual disability historically and currently involves attention to what, how, and where, with the how being the key elements of special education for students with intellectual disability. This chapter discussed the what, how, and where for students with intellectual disability in a historical and current framework while also providing evidence-based practices for students with intellectual disability to implement to maintain the tradition of high-quality services.

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Katherine M. Johnson, Richard M. Simon, Jessica L. Liddell and Sarah Kington

There has been substantial interest in US cesarean rates, which increased from 5% of deliveries in the 1970s to nearly one-third of births by the mid-2000s. Explanations typically…

Abstract

There has been substantial interest in US cesarean rates, which increased from 5% of deliveries in the 1970s to nearly one-third of births by the mid-2000s. Explanations typically emphasize individual risk factors (e.g., advanced maternal age, increased BMI, and greater desire for control over delivery) of women giving birth, or address institutional factors, such as the medicalization of childbirth and the culture of liability leading physicians to practice defensive medicine. We focus here on another non-medical explanation – childbirth education (CBE). CBE is an important, underexplored mechanism that can shape women’s expectations about labor and birth and potentially lead them to expect, or desire, a cesarean delivery as a normalized outcome. We analyze data from three waves (2002, 2006, 2013) of the Listening to Mothers national survey on US women’s childbearing experiences (n = 3,985). Using logistic regression analysis, we examined both mode of delivery (vaginal versus cesarean), and attitudes about future request for elective cesarean among both primiparous and multiparous women. Despite previous research suggesting that CBE increased the likelihood of vaginal delivery, we find that CBE attendance was not associated with likelihood of vaginal delivery among either primiparous or multiparous women. However, both primiparous and multiparous women who attended CBE classes were significantly more likely to say they would request a future, elective cesarean. Furthermore, these effects were in the opposite direction of effects for natural birth attitudes. Our findings suggest that contemporary CBE classes may be a form of “anticipatory socialization”, potentially priming women’s acceptance of medicalized childbirth.

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2023

Ziggi Ivan Santini, Ola Ekholm, Ai Koyanagi, Sarah Stewart-Brown, Line Nielsen, Charlotte Meilstrup, Vibeke Koushede and Lau Caspar Thygesen

Prior research on relations between mental health and pain has focused on negative mental health aspects (e.g. depression), while the literature is scarce in terms of positive…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior research on relations between mental health and pain has focused on negative mental health aspects (e.g. depression), while the literature is scarce in terms of positive aspects, such as mental well-being. This study aims to investigate prospective associations of mental well-being at baseline with pain and functional impairment due to pain in the following year.

Design/methodology/approach

Data stem from a Danish nationally representative survey of 5,000 adults (aged 15+) conducted in 2019 and 2020, which was linked to register data. The Short Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale was used to assess mental well-being, both continuously (range 7–35) and categorically (low, moderate, high). Logistic regressions were conducted to assess associations between mental well-being in 2019 and pain and functional impairment due to pain (among those reporting any pain) in 2020.

Findings

In the fully adjusted models, each point increase in mental well-being was inversely associated with pain (OR = 0.97, 95%CI 0.95–0.99) and functional impairment due to pain (OR = 0.96, 95%CI 0.94–0.99). As compared to low mental well-being, moderate mental well-being was associated with an OR of 0.76 (95%CI 0.58–0.99) for pain and an OR of 0.63 (95%CI 0.46–0.87) of functional impairment due to pain, while high mental well-being was associated with an OR of 0.56 (95%CI 0.40–0.77) for pain and an OR of 0.53 (95%CI 0.34–0.79) for functional impairment due to pain.

Originality/value

Higher mental well-being levels may be protective against pain and functional impairment due to pain. Wider mental health promotion may be considered to prevent pain and associated functional impairments in the general population.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Sarah Stewart-Brown, Mizaya Cader, Thomas Walker, Sabah Janjua, Emma Hanson and Anne-Marie Chilton

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evaluation of a universal, mental well-being and mindfulness programme in a UK graduate entry medical school.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the evaluation of a universal, mental well-being and mindfulness programme in a UK graduate entry medical school.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods used in the paper were the measurement of mental well-being and mindfulness in two cohorts at three time points over 15 months; descriptive, regression and repeated measures analysis with post hoc pairwise comparisons; qualitative interviews with purposive sample of 13 students after one year analysed thematically; and spontaneous anonymous feedback on the course.

Findings

The course was a surprise to students, and reactions were mixed. Respect for its contents grew over the first year. Most students had actively implemented a well-being strategy by the end of the course, and an estimated quarter was practicing some mindful activity. In the context of an overall decline in well-being and limited engagement with mindfulness practice, increases in mindfulness were protective against this decline in both cohorts (p<001). A small minority of students thought that the course was a waste of time. Their attitudes influenced engagement by their peers. The mindfulness and well-being practices of the facilitators were evident to students and influenced perceived effects.

Research limitations/implications

The uncontrolled nature of this observational study and low response rates to the survey limit conclusions. Further research in other medical education settings is needed.

Practical implications

Results are encouraging, suggesting modest benefit in terms of changing attitudes and practices and a modest protective effect on the well-being of students who engaged.

Originality/value

This is the first study of a universal well-being and mindfulness programme in a UK medical school. Universal programmes are rare and evaluation studies are scarce.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2005

Timothy J. Dowd, Kathleen Liddle and Maureen

Research on creative workers speaks to the relative lack of job opportunities available, the role that changing production logics play in shaping such opportunities, and gender…

Abstract

Research on creative workers speaks to the relative lack of job opportunities available, the role that changing production logics play in shaping such opportunities, and gender disparities in success. Tracking 22,561 hits found on Billboard's mainstream charts, we examine various factors that may spur or hamper the success of female recording acts. We find that the expanding logic of decentralized production eliminates the negative effect of concentration on the success of female acts and that the presence of successful female acts in one period bodes well for subsequent female acts, until a glass ceiling of sorts is reached.

Details

Transformation in Cultural Industries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-365-5

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