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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Karen Williams Middleton, Antonio Padilla-Meléndez, Nigel Lockett, Carla Quesada-Pallarès and Sarah Jack

The purpose of this paper is to explores the influence of socialization upon the constitution and integration of learning leading to the development of entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explores the influence of socialization upon the constitution and integration of learning leading to the development of entrepreneurial competence while at university, from the learner perspective. Self-reported learning is analyzed to illustrate ways in which students make use of institutional and social contributions of the university context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates entrepreneurial journeys of 18 participants, either currently attending or recently graduated from three universities in three countries with both comparable and distinctive contextual elements. In depth analysis of individual life stories, focusing on self-identified critical incidents, is used to illustrate ways in which students, while at university, develop entrepreneurial competence for current and future practice.

Findings

Formal and non-formal learning remain important foundations for entrepreneurial competence development, delivered through designed content-centric structures. Informal learning – particularly mentor supported socialised learning – centring around the learner is key to solidifying learning towards entrepreneurial competence, through know-how and access to resources. The university emerges as an entrepreneurial learning space where students constitute and integrate learning gained through different forms.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-cultural analysis is limited as the paper emphasizes the individual’s learning experience relative to the immediate university context.

Practical implications

Universities play a critical role as entrepreneurial learning spaces beyond formal and non-formal learning. This includes dedicating resources to orchestrate informal learning opportunities and enabling interaction with the different agents that contribute to socialised situated learning, supporting entrepreneurial competence development. Universities need to take responsibility for facilitating the entirety of learning.

Originality/value

Socialised learning in combination with other forms of learning contributes to student development of entrepreneurial competence while situated in the university context.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Ian Gordon and Sarah Jack

The need to develop a greater understanding about the creation of social capital and how this might impact on entrepreneurship and the development of the small‐ to…

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1802

Abstract

Purpose

The need to develop a greater understanding about the creation of social capital and how this might impact on entrepreneurship and the development of the small‐ to medium‐sized enterprise (SME) sector requires further research. This paper aims to consider to what extent engagement with higher education institutions (HEIs) by SMEs creates social capital and network benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows the experiences of five SME owners who participated in the Lancaster University LEAD programme (a leadership programme for owner/managers who want to develop their leadership capabilities and grow their business) between 2004 and 2006. Qualitative techniques are used to consider networking activities, use and development of social capital and experiences. A framework for data collection and analysis was developed from the literature review.

Findings

Results show that the experience of engaging with the HEI sector was beneficial. Networks provided the opportunity to create social capital and had a positive impact on the development of the SME and the individual. A number of key elements supported this process namely trust in the individuals running the programme, the creation of a supportive environment where individuals were able to share experiences and social events.

Originality/value

This paper has implications for practitioners and the designers of SME engagement programmes at HEIs. For practitioners, this paper demonstrates that by engaging with the HEI sector, entrepreneurial networks can be extended. For designers, this paper demonstrates that the creation of trust and sociability are key aspects for the success of the experience of engaging. However, this must be coupled with content that is rich in reflection.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2006

Sarah Drakopoulou Dodd, Sarah Jack and Alistair Anderson

Although the literature addressing entrepreneurial networking is reaching a fairly high degree of sophistication and scope, there are certain critical areas where…

Abstract

Although the literature addressing entrepreneurial networking is reaching a fairly high degree of sophistication and scope, there are certain critical areas where important questions remain unanswered. Specifically, research into the processes of entrepreneurial networking has been hindered by a paucity of longitudinal studies. Thus, the consideration of change over time is de facto limited. Moreover, accounts of how individuals actually use networks to learn about entrepreneurship, its practices and processes remain sparse. Yet, we know that learning is a social process, so the research gap lies in relating networks, as social contexts to the entrepreneurial learning process. Furthermore, since social relations are fundamental to everyone's life, and emerge, develop and change throughout their life course, people are embedded in social situations that put them in touch with others (Kim & Aldrich, 2005). Consequently, learning is often “located in the relations among actors” (Uzzi & Lancaster, 2003, p. 398). As well as direct learning through network contacts, network transitivity also facilitates learning by one embedded network member, through the knowledge held by a second member, about a third, as shown in Uzzi and Gillespie's (2002) study. Accordingly, in many ways how entrepreneurs go about using their networks and with whom they network may be critical for entrepreneurship and thus warrants investigation. It is to this end that we now consider the shape, content and process of entrepreneurial networking.

Details

Entrepreneurship: Frameworks And Empirical Investigations From Forthcoming Leaders Of European Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-428-7

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Alistair R. Anderson, Sarah Drakopoulou Dodd and Sarah L. Jack

The purpose of this paper is to consider why entrepreneurship theorising has become fragmented and how the research problem might be resolved.

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6122

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider why entrepreneurship theorising has become fragmented and how the research problem might be resolved.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first examine how entrepreneurial constructs reflect only part of what we “mean” by the construct to argue that we use different social constructions. This explains why theories are fragmented. But the authors then ask how we might use and reconcile this diversity, pointing to the utility of the constructs as part of a complex whole. The authors discuss entrepreneurship as a complex adaptive system showing how connections and relatedness help explain the power of entrepreneurship to use and adapt to change.

Research implications

The authors' proposition of entrepreneurial endeavours as a complex adaptive system provides a fresh theoretical platform to examine aspects of entrepreneurship and improve theorising.

Practical implications

The authors argue that this idea of connecting can also be used at the level of practice – how the connections that entrepreneurs use may help to explain some of what goes on in entrepreneurial practice.

Originality/value

The paper's contribution is a relatively novel way of connecting diverse theorising.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Mary Rose and Sarah Jack

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365

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Jon M. Wargo

Plugging into the multimodal aesthetics of youth lifestreaming, this article examines how three lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ) youths use digital…

Abstract

Purpose

Plugging into the multimodal aesthetics of youth lifestreaming, this article examines how three lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ) youths use digital media production as an activist practice toward cultural justice work. Focusing on the queer rhetorical dimensions of multimodal (counter)storytelling, the communicative practice used to (re)name, remix and challenge epistemic notions of objective reality, this paper aims to highlight how youth worked to (de)compose and (re)author multiple identities and social relationships across online/offline contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Through sustained participant observation across online/offline contexts, active interviewing techniques and visual discourse analysis, this paper illuminates how composing with digital media was leveraged by three LGBTQ youths to navigate larger systems of inequality across a multi-year connective ethnographic study.

Findings

By highlighting how queer rhetorical arts were used as tools to surpass and navigate social fault lines created by difference, findings highlight how Jack, Andi and Gabe, three LGBTQ youths, used multimodal (counter)storytelling to comment, correct and compose being different. Speaking across the rhetorical dimensions of logos, pathos and ethos, the author contends that a queer rhetorics lens helped highlight how youth used the affordances of multimodal (counter)storytelling to lifestream versions of activist selves.

Originality/value

Reading LGBTQ youths’ lifestreaming as multimodal (counter)storytelling, this paper highlights how three youths use multimodal composition as entry points into remixing the radical present and participate in cultural justice work.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Sarah L. Jack and Alistair R. Anderson

The enterprise culture is founded on the premise that entrepreneurship is the engine that drives the economy. One aspect of this cultural pervasion is the increase in the…

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9289

Abstract

The enterprise culture is founded on the premise that entrepreneurship is the engine that drives the economy. One aspect of this cultural pervasion is the increase in the numbers of educational institutions teaching entrepreneurship courses. Yet this hegemony of the encouragement of new business start‐up, almost for its own sake, needs to be critically reviewed. One aspect is the enigmatic nature of entrepreneurship itself; what is it, and can it be taught? Another aspect is the very different expectations of those stakeholders promoting entrepreneurship education. Argues that the process of entrepreneurship involves both art and science; consequently our students need more than SME management skills. Graduating enterprise students must be innovative and creative to satisfy the need for entrepreneurial novelty ‐ the art. Yet, paradoxically they also need to be competent and multifunctional managers ‐ the science. Explores both these areas to argue that theory can bridge the art and science. The final section explains briefly how the recent research and practice at Aberdeen University attempts this synthesis. The intended outcome of our educational process are reflective practitioners, fit for an entrepreneurial career.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Marzia Mortati and Leon Cruickshank

The purpose of this paper is to address social network theory from the perspective of design research and propose a new conceptual approach to understanding and developing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address social network theory from the perspective of design research and propose a new conceptual approach to understanding and developing social networks. These ideas are embodied in a new strategic tool to help companies appreciate, proactively develop and exploit their social networks through visualisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors illustrate how design‐inspired approaches can transform the understanding of social networks through a practical tool to foster innovation and transformation in and between firms. This was developed through an action‐research process and tested with 22 high‐tech, small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Findings

Entrepreneurs are found to benefit from their network by activating the most useful nodes to solve a problem. Conceptually a sub‐group of contacts exists that are activated at different times to extract different resources, that is nodes operate depending on the use they are put to. The authors call these NETS, highly functional portions of networks that catch things. By visualising parts of a network while looking at a number of dimensions, the authors have successfully demonstrated a tool that helps the exploration of a wide variety of relationships to build a strategy for innovation.

Practical implications

The NETS concept represents a tool for facilitating innovation by helping entrepreneurs understand and exploit their social network. It fills the gap between theoretical findings in social network literature and successful application of such ideas.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the highly debated field of social networks by introducing new activities for engagement and analysis crossing the academic/outreach divide; it opens up a new interface between social networks and design research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Jeremy Howells, Ronnie Ramlogan and Shu‐Li Cheng

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and impact of higher education institution (HEI) in a distributed, open innovation system using a survey of some 600…

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1962

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature and impact of higher education institution (HEI) in a distributed, open innovation system using a survey of some 600 firms in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data are used from a postal questionnaire survey of 600 firms across three UK regions: Wales, the North West and the East of England.

Findings

The analysis reveals significant differences in firm collaboration with HEIs across the UK and the value and impact that such collaborations have on firm development. The nature and effects of such collaboration vary significantly between the type of firm involved and their location and the analysis investigates this in relation to various aspects of innovative activity and firm performance.

Originality/value

Although much of the nature and effects of such collaboration are as one would expect, some of the results are counter‐intuitive and highlight the care we should place on assessing the role of universities and other HEIs in open innovation systems.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Sarah Robinson

Downloads
439

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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