Search results

1 – 10 of 108
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Jennifer L. Cox, Claire Ellen Seaman, Sarah Hyde, Katharine M. Freire and Jacqueline Mansfield

There are growing expectations that students graduating from health courses and current health professionals have some proficiency in using telehealth. However, there is…

Abstract

Purpose

There are growing expectations that students graduating from health courses and current health professionals have some proficiency in using telehealth. However, there is limited accessibility to multidisciplinary-based material to meet this need. This paper describes the development of an online telehealth education resource using a co-design approach and the strengths and challenges of embedding authentic learning principles in an open-access online course with a broad target audience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first describe the co-design process of the course and discuss the pedagogy underpinning the course design. Then learner enrolment data is discussed to evidence uptake across key characteristics. Finally, the authors assess the efficacy of the co-design approach by analysing feedback collected from learners at the end of the course.

Findings

The course is structured across four modules and comprises interactive content, reflective tasks, case studies and purposefully developed digital material. Responses from the working group and from learner feedback indicate that the course is an authentic and relevant introduction to telehealth practice for both health students and current health professionals, despite some limitations.

Originality/value

This case study demonstrates the value of a co-design process and key learning design choices in online course development to meet the educational needs of learners from broad disciplinary backgrounds, in various stages of learning/understanding of telehealth and/or requiring a practice-based resource in the context of a rapidly changing policy environment.

Details

Health Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Cheryl Henderson‐Smart, Tracey Winning, Tania Gerzina, Shalinie King and Sarah Hyde

To develop a method for benchmarking teaching and learning in response to an institutional need to validate a new program in Dentistry at the University of Sydney, Australia.

Downloads
3258

Abstract

Purpose

To develop a method for benchmarking teaching and learning in response to an institutional need to validate a new program in Dentistry at the University of Sydney, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

After a collaborative partner, University of Adelaide, was identified, the areas of teaching and learning to be benchmarked, PBL approach and assessment, were established. A list of quality indicators for these aspects of teaching and learning were first developed conceptually and then validated by the literature. Then, using a quality enhancement framework, levels of achievement for each indicator were developed.

Findings

The findings are represented as a set of tables. These were mutually developed with the benchmarking partner and represent an agreed model for a benchmarking project to progress to the next stages of implementation and evaluation.

Practical implications

This model can be adapted for any benchmarking project in all levels of education; primary, secondary, tertiary and continuing.

Originality/value

The issue of benchmarking is high on the educational agenda, especially in higher education. The literature reports on a number of projects but with no clear explanation of a method for benchmarking. The fact that this model is evidence‐based in its approach and that it focuses on learning and teaching, also marks it as original and a significant development in this area.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Ruth Abbey and Sarah Hyde

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on age and the digital divide by examining the uses of and attitudes toward information and communication…

Downloads
2074

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on age and the digital divide by examining the uses of and attitudes toward information and communication technologies (ICTs) by 26 politically senior citizens.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken involved in‐depth face‐to‐face interviews.

Findings

The majority of the respondents are informed and balanced cyber‐enthusiasts who have embraced the opportunities afforded by ICTs to enhance their lives in general, including their political activities.

Originality/value

These findings destabilize the dominant image of older people and their attitudes to and experiences of ICTs that appears in most of the literature on age and the digital divide. Those aged 65 and over represent the last cohort, in Western societies at least, for whom age as such is likely to be a decisive factor in their relationship to ICTs. It is therefore vital to get some insight into their views.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2014

Sarah Parry and Stephen Weatherhead

Due to the emergence of rich personal narratives within recent research, the purpose of this paper is to review and to explore the experience of transition from care and…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the emergence of rich personal narratives within recent research, the purpose of this paper is to review and to explore the experience of transition from care and consider how these accounts can inform care services.

Design/methodology/approach

This meta-synthesis follows from several quantitative and mixed method reviews examining how young people experience aging out of the care system.

Findings

Three themes emerged from an inductive analysis: navigation and resilience – an interrelated process; the psychological impact of survival; and complex relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of a meta-synthesis should not be over generalised and are at least partially influenced by the author's epistemological assumptions (Dixon-Woods et al., 2006). However, a synthesis of this topic has the potential to provide greater insight into how transition can be experienced through the reconceptualising of the personal experiences across the studies reviewed (Erwin et al., 2011).

Practical implications

This synthesis discusses the themes; their relationship to existing research and policies, and suggestions for further exploration. The experience of transition is considered critically in terms of its often traumatic nature for the young person aging out of care but also the ways in which the experience itself can build essential resiliencies.

Social implications

Reflections for clinical practice are discussed with importance placed upon systemic working, accommodating likely challenges and considering appropriate therapeutic approaches for the client group and their systems.

Originality/value

No review thus far has qualitatively examined the narratives told by the young people emerging from care and how these narratives have been interpreted by the researchers who sought them (Hyde and Kammerer, 2009).

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Kenneth F. Hyde, Chris Ryan and Arch G. Woodside

This chapter is a general introduction to the field of case study research in tourism, hospitality, and leisure. The chapter presents a brief review of the literature on…

Abstract

This chapter is a general introduction to the field of case study research in tourism, hospitality, and leisure. The chapter presents a brief review of the literature on the intra-individual logic of case study research. The chapter describes the “four horsemen” for doing case study research: accuracy, generality, complexity/coverage, and value/impact. Examples in the chapter that illustrate this perspective for undertaking case study research may impassion the reader to read through the field guide and personally engage in case study research – at least that is the hope of the editors of this field guide.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2017

Eva Tutchell and John Edmonds

Abstract

Details

The Stalled Revolution: Is Equality for Women an Impossible Dream?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-602-0

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Calum G. Turvey

This paper reviews the life of Liberty Hyde Bailey and highlights his contributions to the structure of US farm credit 100 years after the Country Life Commission.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews the life of Liberty Hyde Bailey and highlights his contributions to the structure of US farm credit 100 years after the Country Life Commission.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a qualitative historical review.

Findings

The paper provides a chronology of life events that led Liberty Hyde Bailey to evolve from botanist/horticulturalists to one of America's most vocal proponents of agricultural and country life, culminating in the recommendation in 1909 that rural credit in the USA be developed along the lines of cooperative principles.

Research limitations/implications

The biography is limited to issues of social science, culminating in 1915.

Practical implications

The paper offers a historical perspective on conditions in agriculture in the early twentieth century and provides insights into how the present system of rural credit in the USA evolved.

Originality/value

This paper provides a historical perspective on US rural credit that is of use to students of rural credit in the USA while providing insights to students and scholars outside of the USA with a perspective on the evolution of US credit reform and cooperative credit.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1972

Ralph Hyde

Until quite recently librarians on the whole were ill‐equipped for being custodians of maps. Even now one fears this is less rarely the case than it ought to be…

Abstract

Until quite recently librarians on the whole were ill‐equipped for being custodians of maps. Even now one fears this is less rarely the case than it ought to be. Hair‐raising stories of early maps in public libraries, wrongly dated, wrongly ascribed, completely unorganised, accounts of antique atlases deposited with love by nineteenth‐century aldermanic benefactors, unguarded, rebound in buckram bindings with ‘912’ stamped on their spines — these and other horror stories are still being swopped by bemused researchers who have had the fortune to stumble on them. What makes this sort of thing the more disturbing is that the number of maps — thanks to natural wear and tear and exports to American universities — is constantly diminishing. Decreasing numbers and increasing demand spells soaring prices. A copy of Horwood's 32 sheet map of London 1792–99 went for £3 at the Gardner sale in 1924. Today one would have to pay something in the region of £250 for the same map. Just on financial grounds alone then we have something of a moral duty to know about our map stocks.

Details

New Library World, vol. 73 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Gareth James Brennan and MaryBeth Gallagher

Occupational choice describes the process that leads to occupational engagement as a result of intrinsic and extrinsic influences. There has been a considerable amount of…

Downloads
6903

Abstract

Purpose

Occupational choice describes the process that leads to occupational engagement as a result of intrinsic and extrinsic influences. There has been a considerable amount of research concerning occupational choice, gender and adolescence. However, this has largely focused on the areas of career choice and engagement in risky health behaviours. This paper aims to expand on the literature by providing a broader scope of occupation more aligned with the concept associated with occupational science. Furthering this, the researcher aims to examine the influence of gender as an extrinsic influence on occupational choice. The researcher aims to explore how contextual influences inform gendered occupational choice.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative approach was used in the current study. Incorporating photographs as a means of elucidating conversation during the interview process, photo-elicitation interview techniques were used as part of the data collection. This involved using a collection of photographs to prompt participants to discuss their interpretations of various occupations. Six adolescent boys and girls aged 11-14 years participated in the study. Participants were recruited from mixed-gendered sports clubs in the West of Ireland. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. An occupational justice perspective was used to interpret the data.

Findings

Responses suggest that gender informs occupational choice through different mechanisms. These included social systems, physical and institutional opportunities as well as expectations participants held of themselves and others they considered to be within their social grouping. Social systems included groups such as friends and family. The ease of access to physical and institutional resources was another factor that informed choice. Participants projected views of expectations they perceived others held for them informed how the participants made their choices. These factors varied across gender. Despite opportunities being available to both sexes, choices were often restricted to particular occupations.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that factors informing the occupational choices of adolescents included a combination of intrinsic factors such as gender and perspectives, as well as external factors including peers, family and opportunities in the local community. Practical applications of this involve acknowledging and further understanding the contextually situated nature of choice to provide more equitable practice. The results of the study may provide more insight into the factors that enable and inhibit occupation. A further understanding of these influences can redirect how we view adolescent occupations in a way that promotes health.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

1 – 10 of 108