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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Margaret Cowell, Sarah Lyon-Hill and Scott Tate

This paper aims to explore the dynamics of entrepreneurial ecosystems with both rural and urban features, as well as the varied system requirements of differing types of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the dynamics of entrepreneurial ecosystems with both rural and urban features, as well as the varied system requirements of differing types of entrepreneurs within such an ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed-methods case study approach, the study examined the Roanoke–Blacksburg region in western Virginia. Researchers conducted quantitative analysis of entrepreneurial metrics and network relationships, as well as qualitative analysis of data collected through entrepreneur surveys and stakeholder interviews.

Findings

Findings suggest entrepreneurs of different types faced disparate challenges and uneven access to resources and networks. Innovation-driven “gazelle” enterprises (IDEs) had numerous growth-related resource needs, including angel, venture and scale-up funding; prototyping equipment and facilities; and translational research by local universities. Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) required more entrepreneurial education programming, subsidized main street office space and clearer pathways through the government regulatory system. A key finding was also concerned with the different ways by which IDEs and SMEs accessed key resources within the ecosystem, illustrated through social network analysis, and supported through qualitative feedback.

Research limitations/implications

Study findings were limited by a relatively low survey response rate from some entrepreneur demographic segments, particularly minorities.

Originality/value

The study represents an in-depth, multi-methods approach that offers insight into two under-researched areas in the ecosystem literature: the dynamics of urban – rural ecosystems and the varied system requirements of different entrepreneur types. The paper includes three overarching recommendations for policy and practice: improved collection and sharing of regional metrics; differentiated approaches to entrepreneurial support based on entrepreneur type; and enhanced efforts to advance inclusive entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Sarah Hill and Robert Halsey

North London Forensic Service is one of the largest NHS medium secure units in the country. Sarah Hill and Robert Halsey describe how the hospital held an inaugural…

Abstract

North London Forensic Service is one of the largest NHS medium secure units in the country. Sarah Hill and Robert Halsey describe how the hospital held an inaugural Festival of Culture. With the well‐documented over‐representation of black and minority ethnic (BME) service users in secure hospitals, the event aimed to provide a forum for user involvement and celebration, as well as feeding into the wider race equality agenda. It also provided an opportunity to realise the benefits and value of therapeutic risk taking.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2007

Sarah Hill

Sarah Hill introduces a new, regular section from the National Social Inclusion Programme (NSIP) on policy developments and best practice in social inclusion and mental health.

Abstract

Sarah Hill introduces a new, regular section from the National Social Inclusion Programme (NSIP) on policy developments and best practice in social inclusion and mental health.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Sarah Hill

Sarah Hill outlines project developments and new reports linked with the National Social Inclusion Programme

Abstract

Sarah Hill outlines project developments and new reports linked with the National Social Inclusion Programme

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2010

Sarah Hill and John Goldsmith

Destructive changes in body shape can happen slowly over a long period of time and may affect any person who has difficulty moving efficiently, irrespective of diagnosis…

Abstract

Destructive changes in body shape can happen slowly over a long period of time and may affect any person who has difficulty moving efficiently, irrespective of diagnosis or age. Supporting the body in symmetrical supine lying has been found to protect and restore body shape, muscle tone and quality of life for people who would otherwise be left to become static in destructive lying postures. Those described as having complex and continuing health care needs or profound and multiple learning disabilities are likely to be at risk of developing changes in body shape. This article will consider predictable patterns of chest distortion and reduction of internal capacity of the abdomen and thorax with key characteristics for those supporting individuals at risk, non‐invasive measurement of body symmetry as a relevant outcome measure in the effort to protect body shape, the consequences for individuals, their families and service providers, positive feedback from families about the benefits of night positioning, the preventable nature of changes in body shape and the practical steps that may be taken to ensure the safety of the individual. Case studies will be presented which demonstrate that the body is a mobile structure which is vulnerable to distortion but also susceptible to restoration as long as the correct biomechanical forces are applied. It is proposed that therapeutic night positioning is an effective intervention which should be made available to those at risk of body shape distortion from an early age, or as a matter of urgency for those with late onset or temporary immobility.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1979

Blake Tyson, Roman Iwaschkin, Gillian Mead, David Reid, Peter Gillman, Wilfred Ashworth, Clive Bingley, Edwin Fleming, Sarah Lawson and Kate Hills

AS A RESULT of present economic problems in Britain and attendant cuts in spending, there is a need to achieve maximum cost‐effectiveness in all sectors of public spending…

Abstract

AS A RESULT of present economic problems in Britain and attendant cuts in spending, there is a need to achieve maximum cost‐effectiveness in all sectors of public spending including libraries. This article examines a simple method by which economies could be made in buying multiple copies of books. It is assumed that unless librarians have freedom to buy a single copy of any book they choose, they will not achieve the breadth and depth required of first‐class libraries, be they in the public sector or in academic institutions. Perhaps second copies need cause little concern, but a pilot survey of a polytechnic library revealed cases where as many as four, six or even eight copies of the same edition had been bought on one occasion before the effectiveness of a lesser purchase could have been evaluated.

Details

New Library World, vol. 80 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1980

Clive Bingley, Edwin Fleming, Allan Bunch, Sarah Lawson and Kate Hills

NEXT JANUARY, it will be ten years since I acquired The library world from W H Smith & Son Ltd. Next July, NEW LIBRARY WORLD may be ten years old.

Abstract

NEXT JANUARY, it will be ten years since I acquired The library world from W H Smith & Son Ltd. Next July, NEW LIBRARY WORLD may be ten years old.

Details

New Library World, vol. 81 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Sarah Hill

The purpose of this paper is to outline a conceptual model for adaptive reuse of heritage assets which has been produced in an effort to fill a gap in information, address…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a conceptual model for adaptive reuse of heritage assets which has been produced in an effort to fill a gap in information, address the complexity of developing heritage assets and encourage more responsible and responsive treatment of heritage assets. The purpose of the model is to visually articulate the various elements that must be considered to successfully develop a heritage asset.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on six years of observation and industry practice, the model reflects a previously undocumented process for developing and adapting built heritage assets employed by many professionals across the UK. The model is further strengthened by drawing from other international theories, concepts, and principles.

Findings

The redevelopment of heritage assets is a “wicked problem”. The model established visually articulates current good practice in the field and provides a simplified version of the process.

Originality/value

Presently, there is insufficient contemporary literature which adequately describes or visualizes the complex adaptive reuse of built heritage in a coherent and holistic way. This model is the first to try to visually capture and communicate current good practice for widespread use. It is hoped that the documentation and dissemination of this process will help to advance creative problem solving, increase the appeal of developing heritage assets and elevate the quality of work produced.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Sarah L. Hill and Neil Small

In the context of changes in the priority given to ensuring that health care is evidence‐based, and that service quality should be maximised, there is a new emphasis on…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of changes in the priority given to ensuring that health care is evidence‐based, and that service quality should be maximised, there is a new emphasis on quality improvement programmes in the UK National Health Service (NHS). It is not clear how far these programmes can be categorised using the paradigms of research and audit. Making a distinction between what constitutes audit, quality improvement and research is important in the context of enhanced clinical and research governance requirements and in an environment of both sensitivity in relation to the ethics of research and concern about the efficacy of ethics committees. This study aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This article reviews the literature on how quality improvement differs from audit and research. It considers different ways of considering ethics in research and questions how far one can rely on professional judgement as an alternative to formal ethics committee procedures. The factors that characterise different sorts of activity are reworked to enable a template to be devised. The template, presented in the form of a flow‐chart, enables health care workers to better categorise a variety of activities and highlights the necessary procedural requirements that follow.

Findings

Key factors are identified in the existing literature that help differentiate between quality improvement, audit and research. These factors range from intent in undertaking the activity, through sample/site selection, choice of methodology, analysis, patterns and speed of dissemination.

Originality/value

If quality improvement is to continue to be a central theme in the NHS agenda, it is important that both the Central Office for Ethical Review and NHS organisations review the categorisation system to include quality improvement in their clinical effectiveness structures.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 3 March 2016

Theresa M. Floyd, Charles E. Hoogland and Richard H. Smith

In this chapter, we explore the implications of benign and malicious envy in the workplace and suggest methods by which leaders can manage the situational context to…

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore the implications of benign and malicious envy in the workplace and suggest methods by which leaders can manage the situational context to minimize negative responses to envy and promote positive responses. We argue that three aspects of the organizational context are especially influential in the development of envy: perceptions of fairness, employees’ feelings of control over their situation, and organizational culture. All three impact whether felt envy will be benign or malicious. In addition, the right organizational culture can prevent any feelings of malicious envy from leading to undesirable behaviors. We suggest that by fostering justice, promoting employee feelings of control, and exemplifying an ethical organizational culture leaders can manage the manifestation of envy and resulting behaviors in a positive direction.

Details

Leadership Lessons from Compelling Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-942-8

Keywords

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